Get The Picture?

February 15, 2005 | Format: MP3

$8.99
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Song Title
Time
Popularity Prime  
30
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2:22
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1:54
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1:55
30
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2:41
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2:30
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2:33
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2:26
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2:58
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2:16
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2:26
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2:51
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2:58
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4:01
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2:47
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2:19
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1:58
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2:39
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18
2:25

Product Details

  • Original Release Date: February 15, 2005
  • Label: Snapper Classics
  • Copyright: (C) 2005 Snapper Classics
  • Total Length: 45:59
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B004TMJ6YG
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (11 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #53,418 Paid in Albums (See Top 100 Paid in Albums)

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

11 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Lozarithm on October 7, 2004
Format: Audio CD
The good cop/bad cop image that the Beatles and the Rolling Stones had in the 1960s may have been a tad contrived. The Beatles weren't the clean cut lads they might have seemed and the Stones certainly played up to the Bad Boys Of Pop reputation they had that oiled the publicity machine so well. They had risen from a pool of bands playing blues and Bo Diddley covers, bands like the Downliners Sect, the Cops 'n' Robbers, the Bo Street Runners and the Pretty Things.

When it came to bad publicity, the Pretty Things had it in spades, and were rarely out of the headlines for their rock 'n' roll crimes. They were badder than the others and their music was rawer, wilder, bluesier and more crudely recorded. Most of them shared a house and lived the rock lifestyle of excess to the full.

Their second album, Get The Picture?, came out only a few months after their self-titled debut, and showed a laudable unwillingness to compromise, though it also showed they had not stood still musically in the intervening months of grueling round-world touring (they seemed to have left the drummer behind in New Zealand) as there was now a light and shade to the group sound and signs of experimentation.

It also featured more of their own material, which included not only ravers like Buzz The Jerk, but also lighter folk-influenced songs like London Town and the excellent Can't Stand The Pain, on which Dick Taylor's guitar stands out. The covers include a great rough and ready rendition of Slim Harpo's Rainin' In My Heart, Ray Charles' version of I Had A Dream and the Cops 'n' Robbers' own But You'll Never Do It Babe. Their hit version of Cry To Me, written by Bert Berns for Betty Harris but best known at the time in Solomon Burke's cover is also featured.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Mr.Smith on June 18, 2008
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
The Pretty Things second album sees the band transitioning from straight-ahead British blues to mid-1960s psychedelia. A great album full of crunching guitars and Phil May's gritty vocals. This package adds six bonus tracks (including LSD and Midnight to Six Man) and some vintage promo videos. A good purchase for fans of the Rolling Stones, Yardbirds and Animals.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on December 8, 1998
Format: Audio CD
Gritty, nasty mid-60s Brit-rock. Imagine Decca era Stones and Them involved in a full out brawl. Back Beats galore! Painfully wrenched pentatonic rave-ups. Marred only slightly by the drummer's perchant for dissappearing for days and leaving studio players to fill in. Guaranteed to completely annoy roommates if played more than once a day.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Randall E. Adams on March 8, 2001
Format: Audio CD
If you remember how much of a stink the Rolling Stones created in the U.S. in 1964 and 1965, you will be amazed at the Pretty Things. Their music is propelled by Dick Taylor's busy amphetamine-driven guitar, Phil May's slobberingly exaggerated vocals (surely the daddy of all heavy metal singers) and Viv Prince's similarly unrestrained drumming (Prince has the distinction of being kicked out of the Hell's Angels for being too wild). And all of it is recorded in a gloriously slapdash murk that would have done Lou Reed or Iggy Pop proud.
This collection shows the band at that all-too-brief moment when they had sufficiently honed their skills to author a batch of excellent original songs including their two most classic singles "Come See Me" and "Midnight to Six Man," just prior to the beginning of the fatal personnel changes that turned the group into a much less engaging psychedelic outfit.
If you savour albums such as "The Who Sings My Generation," then this release is for you.
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8 of 10 people found the following review helpful By "kinkydavray" on April 28, 2004
Format: Audio CD
Following the explosive first set,PRETTY THINGS,it's hard to believe their second is even better--but BELIEVE IT!Going with the unusual trend at the time of writing their own tunes,May and Co. prove themselves to be more than up to the task.Nearly every tune works here from the title tune to the ko signature song,MIDNIGHT TO SIX MAN.Adding their hit British single,the thunderous COME SEE ME,the Pretties display a deft mix of Stones raunch with a Beatlesque sense of melody--get it now!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By patrice on August 24, 2000
Format: Audio CD
I have to admit being slightly disappointed by this cd. I had expected utter greatness and found only sporadic greatness. Still it is a classic bit of dirty r+b, with suitably raunchy guitar and at times lyrics worthy of the soundscapes. My favorite song would have to be "Can't Stand the Pain", which has the late night fractured feel one expects from the best of this genre. Excellent bonus cuts, including the thrown off but fascinating "L.S.D." There is also some archival footage for your computer, that reminds one that however strong the music they were slightly challenged in the charismatic singer category (which may explain why they weren't as big as they surely should have been). Well worth a purchase, though I still prefer SF Sorrow...
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