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16 of 16 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Not the best-known, but the best, September 8, 2005
By 
CGC (Los Angeles, CA USA) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Getaway (Audio CD)
Fans of Chris de Burgh's adult-oriented pop will often cite "Into the Light" (with its massive international hit "The Lady in Red") as their favorite de Burgh album. Fans of de Burgh's early-career acoustic ballads and period stories might cite "Spanish Train" as their favorite. But for me, "The Getaway" is the best.

More assured and less precious than his early work but more evocative and alive than his later releases (which tend to be overproduced), "The Getaway" is a perfect balance of de Burgh's many sounds and interests.

Three tracks are straight-ahead, bright-sounding, energetic rock and roll: "Don't Pay the Ferryman" (his first US hit, which admittedly may seem a bit dated now), the title track, and "Ship to Shore"--the strongest and tightest of the trio. (These represent a sound he would fully explore in "Man on the Line," but as the albums that followed grew more and more reliant on synthesizers, the energy of his rock numbers dissipated.)

His art-rock and period interests are represented by the three part epic "Revolution/Light a Fire/Liberty," whose content is obvious from the titles, building energy in part one, exploding in part two, and settling down to a quiet acoustic sound in the last segment. While it's not quite as strong as earlier epics, it still succeeds.

The rest of the album consists of the light-hearted, light-rock but very catchy "Living on the Island" and some of the best ballads of his career. These include "Counting on You" (written for his new-born child), "Where Peaceful Waters Flow," and the melancholy anti-war "Borderline." All have become staples of his concerts and greatest-hit collections.

"The Getaway" was my introduction to Chris de Burgh, and twenty-two years later, it's still the best place to start.

[Note: this import edition appears released more recently that the US version by A&M. I am not aware, however, if it has been remastered.]
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11 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Another excellent record from Chris' early career, March 9, 2004
This review is from: Getaway (Audio CD)
WHO LIKES CHRIS DE BURGH? HOW CAN ANYONE LIKE THAT TWEE, CRUDDY SONGWRITER?, scream the critics.
Chris De Burgh has undoubtedly been the victim of some unnecessarily bad press since 1986, when "The Lady In Red" destroyed his credibility. What's often ignored, however, is that some of his early records are actually very good.
There's a whole host of great songs on this album - "The Getaway", "Where Peaceful Waters Flow", "Borderline" - laid back ballads that could be mistaken for De Burgh's namesake and one-time chart rival Chris Rea during his own early career if De Burgh's vocals were not totally different to Rea's, all talking about experiences with those close to you, but with none of the slush and pomp that made all his records between 1986 and 1991 unlistenable.
Even if you don't like rock balladry, at least check this album out for "Don't Pay The Ferryman" - a soaring rock ballad, with sniping vocals, rip-roaring guitar riffs, and washes of keyboard all in one - a pure joy to listen to indeed!
Who likes Chris De Burgh, ask the critics? I'll tell you who likes Chris De Burgh - the thousands of people who check out his back catalogue every year, after realising that there's more to this man's music than just THAT song.
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Where Peaceful Waters Flow, February 22, 2000
By 
Jason Stein (San Diego, CA United States) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)   
This review is from: Getaway (Audio CD)
This album came out in 1982 and I remember the video for "Don't Pay the Ferryman" on MTV--yes, back in the days when MTV would play an artist like Chris De Burgh. I bought the tape in 1984 and ever since have been a fan. In CDB's entire catalogue I have to say that The Getaway and Man on the Line are his two most rocking albums. They are concise, brief pop excursions. The Getaway is slightly better than Man on the Line though. The 12 tracks on The Getaway show how diverse CDB can be. From rockers to ballads, the storytelling is interesting, never dull. His later works are bogged down with trite adult contemporary pop and less adroite storytelling. The Getaway is a nice change of pace and doesn't sound like it was released in 1982. It still holds up after 18 years. It's worth the money.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Not his most famous, but his best, September 8, 2005
By 
CGC (Los Angeles, CA USA) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Getaway (Audio CD)
Fans of Chris de Burgh's adult-oriented pop will often cite "Into the Light" (with its massive international hit "The Lady in Red") as their favorite de Burgh album. Fans of de Burgh's early-career acoustic ballads and period stories might cite "Spanish Train" as their favorite. But for me, "The Getaway" is the best.

More assured and less precious than his early work but more evocative and alive than his later releases (which tend to be overproduced), "The Getaway" is a perfect balance of de Burgh's many sounds and interests.

Three tracks are straight-ahead, bright-sounding, energetic rock and roll: "Don't Pay the Ferryman" (his first US hit, which admittedly may seem a bit dated now), the title track, and "Ship to Shore"--the strongest and tightest of the trio, with a very well-placed horn section). (These represent a sound he would fully explore in "Man on the Line," but as the albums that followed grew more and more reliant on synthesizers, the energy of his rock numbers dissipated.)

His art-rock and period interests are represented by the three part epic "Revolution/Light a Fire/Liberty," whose content is obvious from the titles, building energy in part one, exploding in part two, and settling down to a quiet acoustic sound in the last segment. While it's not quite as strong as earlier epics, it still succeeds.

The rest of the album consists of the light-hearted, light-rock but very catchy "Living on the Island" and some of the best ballads of his career. These include "Counting on You" (written for his new-born child), "Where Peaceful Waters Flow," and the melancholy anti-war "Borderline." All have become staples of his concerts and greatest-hit collections.

"The Getaway" was my introduction to Chris de Burgh, and twenty-two years later, it's still the best place to start.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Thats right, 21 years old, March 27, 2005
By 
J. Sanders (Stationed in Japan) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Getaway (Audio CD)
I am 21 years old and this is one of my favorite albums. It ranks just lower than System of a Down's self titled and Manson's Anti-Christ Superstar. I heard it for the first time when I was 16 going through my Dad's tapes (yeah, TAPES.) I just now found out what the album was called and ordered two (one for myself and one to replace the tape i stole from my dad 5 years ago.) This is not the same "Lady in Red" music you have to put up with in every crappy love story movie, its good music. So whether you fit in with the genre of people who listen to the kind of music I was conceived to or are atleast willing to give it a chance, I would recomend this album.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A highlight among de Burgh's work, January 24, 2006
This review is from: Getaway (Audio CD)
This is probably Chris de Burgh's strongest album even if it is not his most recognized or commercially successful work. I'm not sure if Chris himself picked the tracks for his greatest hits compilation of 1989, Spark to a Flame, or if his record label was responsible. Either way, it reflects the strength of this album that five tracks here made the greatest hits: "Don't Pay the Ferryman," "The Getaway," "Ship to Shore," "Borderline" and "Where Peaceful Waters Flow."

"Ferryman" was Chris' first real hit around the world. It's a strong, driving rock song with a great hook and a nice lyric. The imagery is typical of de Burgh's story-song settings even if this is not one of his deeper lyrics. "Getaway" and "Ship to Shore" are two other catchy, rockier songs on the album, with the rest being quieter ballad-type songs.

"Borderline" is a sadly sung ballad about a soldier longing for the day there is no more war and he can return to his love. This song had an interesting sequel five years later on the album Into the Light. Chris actually sampled the closing lines of "Borderline" before heading into the faster and more upbeat "Say Goodbye to it All." I remember how "Borderline" was strummed on guitars by soldiers at a real borderline in the war between Angola and South Africa.

"Where Peaceful Waters Flow" recalls earlier de Burgh ballads like "In a Country Churchyard" and "A Spaceman Came Travelling." It's a haunting song with a beautiful chorus. All these songs make the album worth getting.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The Hook, February 10, 2001
This review is from: Getaway (Audio CD)
A fan of medieval history, historical and high fantasy fiction, Don't Pay the Ferryman, with its video and mythological/Shakespearean references, caused me to spend what little money I had as a sophomore in high school (1982) and buy the 45. I played DPTF over and over again before finally deciding to flip the single over and hear what was on the other side. And from the very first "water drops" of All The Love I Have Inside, I found myself an immediate Chris De Burgh fan. That night I scrabbled together my pennies and nickels (okay, I'm dramatizing here, but not by much!) and begged my Mom to take me back to the mall so that I could buy the album. I brought it home, and began a love affair with his music.
DeBurgh tells stories with his music, and being an avid reader, it was easy to find an appreciation for his music. A romantic sap, it was also easy to relate to his ballads, which he writes with authority.
I'll go back to this CD from time to time, and I find the songs that I still listen to the most are: Ship to Shore and All the Love I Have Inside -- passing strange that the song that served as the hook (Don't Pay the Ferryman) doesn't elicit the same feelings now that it did then. Not that I don't still enjoy the song -- far from it! -- but those other two have passed the test of time.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Just a light through the time, September 25, 2004
By 
NEGUS (Toluca, México) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Getaway (Audio CD)
We are in the early XXI century and many songs circa 80's keep on playing in our heads and lives. Chris de Burgh music is an example of good and everlasting music. "Don't pay the ferryman", "Where peaceful waters flow", are just an example. If you really want to listen music really worths to be listened and rememebered, take youself the chance to enjoy this album (and all Mr. de Bugh ones).
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5 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars 'The Getaway' --- this music is timeless, April 25, 2000
By 
Andrea (Port Elizabeth, South Africa) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Getaway (Audio CD)
I have always enjoyed Chris de Burgh's music, although his most famous songs are most often not my favourites. The 'Getaway' is, however, one of my favorite CD's. This is not because it is not famous, but rather because it has a wide variety of songs which are as unusual as they are timeless. Some songs such as 'Living on the Island' sound as though they could have come from one of Chris de Burgh's earliest album's, while there are others such as 'Don't Pay the Ferryman' which are relatively modern. Songs like 'Where Peaceful Waters Flow' (one of my favorites) give one a taste of his softer melodies, while ones such as the 'Getaway' are completely different. This album, I think, has the best mixture of music in any of his CD's. In other words: if you can honestly say that you did not enjoy (or at least stop and think about) one song on this CD, then you have absolutely no taste and really shouldn't be listening to Chris de Burgh, because this is him at his best.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Getaway by Chris de Burgh, June 12, 2007
This review is from: Getaway (Audio CD)
I love the music and the artist. I wore out the tape of this artist so I
decided to replace it.
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Getaway
Getaway by Chris De Burgh (Audio CD - 1985)
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