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Getting Away With It : Or: The Further Adventures of the Luckiest Bastard You Ever Saw Paperback – Bargain Price, November 1, 2000


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Paperback, Bargain Price, November 1, 2000
$18.69 $8.45

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--This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 224 pages
  • ISBN-10: 0571190251
  • ASIN: B000C4SNDK
  • Product Dimensions: 8.4 x 5.2 x 0.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8.8 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,844,731 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"Too funny, too true, too sad to put down." --David Thomson, The Independent on Sunday
--This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

About the Author

Steven Soderbergh's films include Erin Brockovich and Ocean's Eleven. Richard Lester's last film was Get Back, a documentary of the 1989-90 Paul McCartney tour.
--This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

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Customer Reviews

3.9 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Christopher Conway on February 12, 2001
Format: Paperback
The majority of this book is a series of interviews between Stephen Soderbergh and Richard Lester that will mainly be of interest to fans of Mr. Lester, filmmakers and aspiring filmmakers. The first two-thirds of the book is basically a film-by-film discussion of Mr. Lester's ouevre, which too often (for my tastes) lapses into shop talk (lighting setups, film stock, etc.) and "I love it when Michael Crawford..."-type observations. I found myself skimming whole sections looking for more interesting and accessible anecdotes and discussions.
The other major part of the book is Soderbergh's journal c.1996 -- from about the time he finished editing "Schizopolis" and "Gray's Anatomy" through the months of trying to get them released, ending with his agreement to direct "Out of Sight". These sections are livelier and more amusing but get repetitive (negotiations fall through time and again, law suits drag on, procrastination is a never-ending theme) and too cute/clever (the wry footnotes get old after... well, pretty much right away).
I don't mean to be so down on this book -- I did enjoy it quite a bit -- but my expectations were higher and I know a lot of people who are not as interested in the technical side of filmmaking will find much of this material tedious. I would recommend it (highly) for those with that inclination, and also for fans of Mr. Lester's films (i.e., those who have seen and enjoyed at least "A Hard Day's Night", "The Knack", "Petulia", and one or two others). All others should approach warily.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Kyle Carritt on July 16, 2001
Format: Paperback
Being a fan of his work/output over the past few years, Soderbergh's book of interview and journal entries appeared to be a must-buy. It proved to be quite interesting and very revealing. The Richard Lester interview pieces may drag in some parts (being unaware of Mr. Lester's own filmography, this may seem destined), yet the two directors do contemplate a variety of subjects outside of filmmaking (the purpose of man, religion, and many other topics). The journal entries are hilarious bits and pieces of the Writer's Deliema/Writer's Block. Soderbergh constantly engages and his bizarre sense of humor peppers the book (all of the footnotes, for instance).
All in all, fascinating read, and it even turned me on to the films of Lester (bought "The Knack" the day after reading it).
Bravo, Steve.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By George B. Moise on January 1, 2001
Format: Paperback
Finally, a window into Steven Soderbergh, the eclectic director of Schizopolis and Kafka. But I guess most people will know him as (in big flashy capital letters) "THE DIRECTOR OF ERIN BROCKOVICH & OUT OF SIGHT" as he's being billed now. I find it funny that Soderbergh is now considered this "Hollywood" director when, upon reading this book (and viewing his entire filmography), you find him almost the antithesis of your typical "Hollywood" personality. He's moody, self involved (in a good way), and a hilarious procrastinator.
But that's just one half of the book. Intercut with Soderbergh's journal entries (which date from just after he finished 'Schizoplois' and 'Gray's Anatomy' to him helming 'Out of Sight)are a collection of interviews he has with Richard Lester, the groundbreaking director of "A Hard Days Night" and "The Knack" (which I just saw and absolutely loved). I have to confess I had not seen almost any of Richard Lester's work (not including the Superman movies of which I had no idea he was involved) and since all they talk about is Lester's films I found it uninteresting to read about movies I've never seen. I did though, through Soderbergh's praise, go and watch a number of Lester's movies and then went back and read the sections that discussed them.
But the real magic of this book, at least to me and to all the Soderbergh-ites out there, is Soderbergh. His journal entries are insightful, funny, and really honest. And his style is so casual it feels like reading over letters from an old friend. I absolutely flew through his journal entries and enjoyed ever one of them.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on December 29, 2000
Format: Paperback
Steven Soderberg has repeatedly proven that he is one of the best working filmmakers in the United States and the world with films like Sex, Lies, and Videotape, Out of Sight, The Limey, and others. Now he has, like Cameron Crowe and Francois Truffaut before him, sat down with one of his idols to discuss the filmmaking process. This book is not to be missed. The insight that both Soderberg and Richard Lester (both Palme d'Or winners) bring to that table about the state of filmmaking both today and in the past as well as the future. Included also is Soderberg's diary entries as he completes Gray's Anatomy and Schitzopolis. These alone are worth the price of admission. All in all, the best film book of 2000.
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