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Comment: Crisp and clean softcover in good condition with moderate shelf-wear to surface and edges. Interior pages are clean and free from writing and highlighting. Spine is solid and binding is tight. Upper and lower corners of front cover are slightly bent. Book is in stock and ready for immediate shipment. Eligible for FREE Super Saver and Prime Shipping! International orders welcome! Thanks for the purchase!
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Getting a Job: A Study of Contacts and Careers Paperback – March 15, 1995

ISBN-13: 978-0226305813 ISBN-10: 0226305813 Edition: 2nd

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 259 pages
  • Publisher: The University Of Chicago Press; 2nd edition (March 15, 1995)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0226305813
  • ISBN-13: 978-0226305813
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 0.9 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8.8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #663,210 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Mark Granovetter is professor of sociology and organization behavior at Northwestern University and Kellogg Graduate School of Management.


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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

15 of 16 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on November 13, 2002
Format: Paperback
Mark Granovetter reveals how people make economic decisions and take economic actions based on the social structure they are embedded in. We are not totally rational beings as the old economists would have us believe -- we are social beings -- influenced by, and influencing those around us. It is how we vote, how we dress, how we think, what careers we pursue and what products we buy.
Yet, those immediately around us may not be very useful in helping us find a job! Our close associates know what we know at the same time we know it! Therefore, they are not very useful for telling us something new -- like where a job opening is. To find out about jobs, we don't already know about, we need to go outside of our immediate social circle to connect to people we don't see very often any more[old friends, college chums, old army buddies, former co-workers, old sorority sisters]. They now live in different social circles than we do. These social circles have information not available in our social circle -- some of the info is about job openings.
This classic book is still highly relevant and useful after 30 years! The book is somewhat `academic' in parts, but is so full of `gems' that it is worth slogging through the research numbers. Every college graduate should read this book and keep it handy till they retire.
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Denis Benchimol Minev on March 4, 2003
Format: Paperback
This book is an interesting introduction to the workings of the labor market. The main theory revolves around the fact that contacts within our social circle usually do not have access to information we do not already have; in order to get new information, we need to extend social circles and reach for those with whom we do not have constant contact.
Through a very academic approach to the problem, the scientific approach is best to help us understand how people get jobs. I originally read this book as an undergraduate in a labor economics course, and I have recently consulted it again (10yrs later) and found many insights I had not caught the first time around.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Valdis Krebs on December 3, 2007
Format: Paperback
This is the study where the famous "Strength of Weak Ties" paper came from -- IMHO, the best named social science paper ever! Worth the price just to understand the importance, and use, of "weak ties" in our social networks.

This book is a mix of academic and practical. I have recommended it to several clients and friends who don't mind the academic prose to find pearls of wisdom here. Very useful for people trying to understand how the knowledge-worker job-finding process works. Good for HR folks and those who have been RIFfed. A great supplemental book for an HR class in Talent Mgt.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By The Fabric Collector on May 22, 2012
Format: Paperback
Skim past the brief economics terminology to the gold mine that starts at the end of chapter five or so and ends triumphantly with the author's conclusions and implications. This book makes a stunning and convincing claim about why connections are the default way we run our lives and therefore don't need to be seen as evil. But once the author draws that conclusion, a whole array of startling points leads on from there. A brief and overlooked miracle of a book that somehow lies buried among the mediocre self help best-sellers. This book transcends those because it pretends only to be exactly what it is.

Just watch out for the first few chapters which seem to cater to economists only and really undersell the implications at the end.
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By Jesse Tieu on February 25, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This product was great because it came in just like it was advertised. It was new and was in excellent condition.
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