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73 of 78 people found the following review helpful
on November 29, 2001
Should be subtitled, "How Two Seattle Yuppies Retired Early on 3.5K a Month". This book contains some helpful info, but I was hoping to see someone with a negative net worth pay off their debts and become FI. What I got was the story of a couple of yuppies saying, "Whoa, were worth a bundle and if we refuse to pay for our kids' college we can retire early". Not too impressive to me. I would not read this book if I were looking for material on voluntary simplicity. Why does Vicki Robin endorse this book?
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57 of 60 people found the following review helpful
on June 28, 1999
Although I own and have read both Your Money or Your Life and Getting a Life, I prefer this book of the two. Blix and Heitmiller had what to most people is the American Dream: high-paying jobs, a nice house, a boat, a sleek car, and other yuppie 'toys'. But they gradually began to realize that they were trapped in a gilded cage -- although they had nice things, they were too overworked and stressed out to really enjoy them, or to pursue non-work interests in what little free time off they had from running the rat race. When they discovered Your Money or Your Life, their lives changed drastically, and definitely for the better. Their story (and others contained in the book) really resonated with me. It took a lot of courage for them to be as open as they were about all aspects of their lives, from their relationship with money to explicit itemizations of what they earn and spend every month (a taboo subject for most people, and one that I absorbed with avid fascination). Whereas Your Money or Your Life is a clear and explicit blueprint for achieving financial independence, Getting a Life is akin to a collection of survivor stories. This book also reiterates the steps contained in YMOYL (although in not as much detail), so it is a nice introduction into the realm of voluntary simplicity.
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53 of 58 people found the following review helpful
We read Duane Elgins excellent book Voluntary Simplicity decades ago, and would simply caution that this book Getting A :Life will probably appeal to those who have lots of money and really do not have to worry about making ends meet. For those who are on some type of a fixed income. or those with middle class incomes in a precarious economy it doesn't have much useful information. And I agree with those reviews that note the "yuppy" element.
We run a small simple living group in the Sierras, that is like the ones we ran in Alameda and San Joaquin counties here in California. So we are not new to the live simply and get out of debt ideas. And I note that there is a big difference between spoiled brats needing to learn what is really important in life and those who know what is important in life and want to know even more about how to simplify their lives.
The Intenet be it google searches or Yahoo groups has a whole lot more free information that is useful than this book. Amazon[.com]offers a whole lot more books on the subject that I would recommend.
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30 of 33 people found the following review helpful
on October 11, 2000
I recommend that you read 'Your Money or Your Life' (YMOYL) before you read this book. I waited about 2 or 3 months to give YMOYL time to really sink in before I read this. When I started reading, I found myself trying to read very slowly so that I could absorb everything. It is very inspiring and englightening to read about other people's experiences following the YMOYL philosophy and the ways that they have integrated this into their lives.
I think your experience with this book will closely follow YMOYL. If you liked YMOYL, then you should find this book inspiring and very interesting. If you didn't, then you won't. If you want more detail on how YMOYL has affected people's lives, then you will enjoy...
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39 of 48 people found the following review helpful
on May 7, 1999
Great advice except it's already been written. Buy "Your Money or Your Life" and check out "Getting A Life" from the library if you must. I guarantee you'll be sick of reading about 40 year old ex-yuppies coming off their spending binges.
This book is just an echo of the first book. I can't believe Vicki Robin endorsed this book, what she against overkill and all.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
on March 23, 2005
In Your Money or Your Life, Dominguez and Robin lay out an easy-to-undestand system that will result in financial security. The challenge is in implementation. It's the little things that tend to derail even the most well-intentioned plans.

The value of this book is that it is a great implementation tool. If you haven't read YMOYL, you'll be scratching your head at many of the the things that Heitmiller and Blix assume you already know. The authors do tend to spend a lot of time on "the way we were" but I suspect it's because their epiphany has so dramatically altered their lives. Don't dwell on it. This is a book about living better, not class struggle.

The bottom line is that if you're going to commmit to the 9 step program Dominguez and Robin outline in YMOYL, you're going to need help. This book is the best source of help I've found and I recommend it (as others have) because the real life stories of others who have taken the journey you've embarked on serve as a source of motivation and how to advice that simply isn't available elsewhere.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
I personally loved this book. It is rare to find a book that is written by people that really did break out of the rat race. That really walked away from fast paced careers and high spending to become financially free. The authors literally structured their lives to live off their investments. They tell you how they did this step by step, what their money is invested in and show their household budget and discuss the daily routine of their lives.
The book is written as a sequel to "Your money or your life" by Joe Domiguez and Vicki Robin. The original book laid out a nine step plan for achieving financial independence. This book goes through the nine steps again but shows real life examples of people who did them or are in the process. The premise is that you fully examine your relationship with money, how much you have earned in your life, the real value you get from what you spend it on, and ponder if it is worth your life energy to work so hard for your belongings. The game is to track every penny you spend, it is not about a budget but understanding where your money is going and redirect it to the areas that you find most important to you. Also the book explains how to create a wall chart and track your monthly investment income on one line and your monthly expenses on another, when your investment income crosses over your expenses you are technically financial free. What do you do then? Author Joe Dominguez recommends in the first book whatever you want. But financial freedom is not about being wealthy it is about having "enough" in your life. Once you get to a point more material things not only do not make you happy but actually begin to make you unhappy or miserable if you become trapped in debt with large car payments, mortgages, or worst of all a job that you are burned out on completely. It is shocking how much we spend to work with clothes, gas, car maintenance, car payments, child care, eating at work, being to tired to cook, and the need to take expensive vacations to get away from it all. The book is a real eye opener.
This book is about becoming financially free so you can pursue what is most important to you. It is about being inwardly rich and outwardly simple. It is about identifying what is really most important to you in your life. If you value your time, your family, simplicity, self sufficiency, freedom, and security then this book will show you how to be rich in these areas. You really get the nuts and bolts, and step by step examples of how others achieved financial freedom and you can too.
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on May 24, 2012
I enjoyed the book, I'm curious as to how things turned out for them. One thing that I disagree with is not having to worry about inflation, my Dad bought his house for 16k. It is now worth 400k. Similarly his full time salary has increased from 2k to 80k. You cannot tell me inflation isn't real. It is, and you need to have enough money to take it into account. But this is a relatively minor point. I also agree that the ideas are more relevant to those who are on a larger income to begin with. People who live to week on a small wage already tend to be frugal - they have to be! And if they saved, what, 100 bucks a week, which would be hard, then it would take them 100 years to save 500 k, which would give them interest of what 25 or 30k. So it's a pipe dream really.

Joe Dominguez retired at 30 with 500k in the 80s. No wonder he could live off that forever. How much would that be now? 2 million? That's a much different prospect to the suggestions in the program.

I love the idea of all of this. But I'm not sure the FI aspect of it is realistic for many. Working less thanks to spending less is. Not wasting your hard earned is always good advice. but I wonder if some of the great unwashed will end up with false hope.

David
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3 of 6 people found the following review helpful
on July 1, 2008
This couple's contention that they are living simply is a joke. It's easy to choose voluntary simplicity when you can live off the interest of your investments. I also understand that one of their tenets is to borrow whenever possible, including borrowing a friend's van to transport a group of other VS types to a gathering. During the trip, the van broke down. Did Mr. Heitmiller offer to pay for the repairs? Oh, heck no, it wasn't his fault because the van was due to break down. Guess the friend won't be able to adopt the VS lifestyle because he will have to work to pay for the repairs. Mooching off your friends doesn't qualify as VS, does it? People who are living the VS lifestyle because their economic situation forces them to do so are in a better position to write a book about how it's done. People with a million bucks in the bank have a rather comfy cushion.
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6 of 13 people found the following review helpful
on February 20, 1999
This book opens up a whole new avenue for living. I see things in a totally different light. For the first time in my life I truly know that I can be the one to affect my own future. I no longer have to rely on my job/husband/the lottery, etc., for security. I have everything I need. This book shows you that you have the ability to live life by your own rules and in a way that is earth friendly. Excellent!
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