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Getting over Getting Older Paperback – May 1, 1997


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 336 pages
  • Publisher: Berkley Trade (May 1, 1997)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0425157938
  • ISBN-13: 978-0425157930
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 0.9 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 14.2 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (12 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,223,369 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

Not everyone--not even every feminist--holds to the belief that age brings wisdom, power, and its own beauty. Faced with turning 50, Letty Cottin Pogrebin, founder of Ms. and author of several books including Growing Up Free, says her reactions ranged "from astonishment to anger, from confusion to curiosity, from denial to disgust." Using herself as a compass and adding many other well- known voices, Pogrebin's irreverent book takes on friendship, sex, love, dieting, mothering adults, the physical and emotional depredations of aging, and mortality. Rather than stubbornly toeing the line on spurning plastic surgery, for example, she thoughtfully explores "the tension between artificiality and authenticity." In the end, she concludes, one can devote one's remaining years to lamenting and running after lost youth or put that time to far better uses. Despite a glib, overly playful tone that trivializes certain issues, Pogrebin's desire to share downplayed truths is a boon.

From Publishers Weekly

Pogrebin (Deborah, Golda and Me), a founding editor of Ms magazine, is the latest baby boomer to weigh in with her thoughts on what turning 50 means to a woman. In anecdotes that range from humorous and insightful to occasionally tedious and self-indulgent, drawn from her own experiences and from the lives of friends, the 55-year-old Pogrebin ruminates on the pros and cons of aging. According to the author, the loss of a youthful appearance and a decrease in energy are offset by the freedom that comes when child-rearing ends. Age, she says, can also bring a heightened sense of living in the now. Of particular interest is an account of Pogrebin's emotional turmoil when she had to have a needle biopsy after a suspicious mammogram reading. Although much of her advice for coping with midlife, such as the benefits of discovering solitude, is useful, certain suggestions like living well and traveling are available only to the financially secure. Major ad/promo.
Copyright 1996 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

36 of 39 people found the following review helpful By C. Lacher on January 25, 2000
Format: Paperback
Maybe I didn't enjoy this so much because I am only 45 and, therefore, a good 15 years younger than the author. That makes us of different generations making her personal anecdotes difficult to relate to. In addition, I don't have a great career, I'm not married, I don't live in a large metropolitan & cosmopolitan area, I don't have a group of fabulous girlfriends to drink wine and compare stories with, and I don't have kids (and likely never will) so again, I found a lot to not bond about with the author.
The opening chapter, however, was wonderful and had me howling in my chair. I hoped that fun would be maintained throughout the book. Instead, I felt the book spent too much time talking about superficial aspects of aging like eating right, exercising, and keeping your mind alert by trying new things (well, duh!). She also completely overlooks the more spiritual aspects of mortality in favor of political discussions about women in society (important but not what I'm needing right now). There was a rather graphic description of a breast bioposy which was riveting (the author holds nothing back there and thank you for that) Maybe in another five years I'll connect better instead of finding this to read very much like an irritating upbeat "how-to-be a glowing senior citizen article" out of Good Housekeeping Magazine. For now, I'd recommend Awakening at Midlife by Kathleen Brehony.
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14 of 16 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on August 4, 1997
Format: Paperback
A must-read for those 49 1/2 and--sorry--older.
My sister (55) recommended it to me (52) after I noticed that some men I had dated were starting to die in their 50's. I landed on Pogrebin's

reassuring comment that death isn't a factor of
aging but a factor of life with relief and
recognition. She approaches the good, the bad,
and the ugly (and what her grownup daughters label
even as disgusting) with humor and the sense
of sisterhood and community that are her hallmark.
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7 of 9 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on May 18, 2000
Format: Hardcover
This book was like talking with a close friend. I thank Letty for being honest, sensitive and very funny. If you are 50 it's a must read...I bought 6 copies to give to friends!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Delin Colon on September 27, 2008
Format: Hardcover
While I had adjustments to make when I came into my 50's, this book didn't really help, as Pogrebin was far more freaked out than I was about aging, and seems to spend the book convincing herself that it's ok. I wasn't concerned with a lot of the superficial stuff with regard to aging... looks, weight, etc. So it was more the spiritual and existential aspects of life that interested me. But, even up to the end of the book, it sounded to me like a frantic effort to make herself comfortable with the aging process. Letty's mother-in-law (my nursery school teacher), Esther Pogrebin, was a true feminist who was always comfortable in her own skin and freaked out by very little - now, she could have written a terrific book on aging.
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By Ann B. Webb on February 21, 2009
Format: Hardcover
I found this to be the best book of its type that I have read. It is upbeat, practical and written in a pleasant to read style. It is helpful without sugarcoating or depressing.
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By Caryl R. Hancock on August 29, 2014
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Somewhere between 2 and 3 stars - the author is not nearly old enough to write about the subject!
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More About the Author

Letty Cottin Pogrebin is a writer, activist, and national lecturer.

A founding editor and writer for Ms. Magazine, Pogrebin is also the author of eleven books, including the new novel, Single Jewish Male Seeking Soul Mate (May 2015), the memoirs Deborah, Golda, and Me: Being Female and Jewish in America, and Getting Over Getting Older, the novel Three Daughters, and the groundbreaking How to Be a Friend to a Friend Who's Sick. She is also the editor of the anthology Stories for Free Children, and consulting editor on Marlo Thomas' Free to Be... You and Me.

Pogrebin's articles, op-eds, and columns have been published in a wide variety of print and online publications, including the New York Times, Time, The Nation, Ms., Huffington Post, Harpers Bazaar, Travel & Leisure, Moment, and the Forward.

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