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Comment: Condition: Very good condition., Very good dust jacket. Binding: Hardcover. / Edition: First Edition, 1st Printing Publisher: Atria Books / Pub. Date: 2006-03-28 Attributes: Book, 272 pp / Illustrations: B&W Photographs Stock#: 2050931 (FBA) * * *This item qualifies for FREE SHIPPING and Amazon Prime programs! * * *
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Getting Open: The Unknown Story of Bill Garrett and the Integration of College Basketball Hardcover – March 28, 2006


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 272 pages
  • Publisher: Atria Books (March 28, 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0743479033
  • ISBN-13: 978-0743479035
  • Product Dimensions: 9.5 x 6.4 x 1.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 15.2 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (12 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,608,530 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Bill Garrett was the Jackie Robinson of college basketball, even if today he's mostly remembered only by dedicated Hoosier hoops fans. Because Indiana was as racially intolerant as the South during the early 20th century, it wasn't surprising that although Garrett had led his small town's underdog team to the 1947 state high school championship, he couldn't play for Indiana University, which followed the Big Ten schools' " 'gentleman's agreement' not to recruit or play blacks." But during the postwar civil rights movement, IU's administration was pressured to accept Garrett on the team. Invariably calm and courteous, no matter how many players taunted him or hotels refused to give him a room on the road, Garrett played at IU from 1948 to 1951 and on the night of his last game was given a roaring ovation. The Korean War ended Garrett's chance to gain immortality with the recently integrated Celtics, but he spent the rest of his life happily coaching and teaching. Father and daughter Graham and Cody refrain from reveling in numbing, point-by-point details, instead offering a striking and honest portrait of a man overcoming racism in a place that barely acknowledged its existence. (Mar.)
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

From Booklist

Bill Garrett was the first black basketball player in the prestigious Big Ten college conference. He earned his basketball reputation at Shelbyville High School in Indiana, where he was named the state's Mr. Basketball in 1947. The authors, a father-daughter team with roots in Shelbyville, split their focus between the story of an extraordinary young man and the political battle waged on his behalf by the leader of the world's largest black YMCA and Indiana University's visionary president. Indiana seemed an unlikely setting for the integration of Big Ten basketball, given its reputation as the most racist of northern states, but basketball-crazy Hoosiers rose to the occasion. Recently much attention has been directed to Texas Western's all-black 1966 NCAA champions, but before there could be five black starters, there had to be one. Garrett's story--which includes a successful career as a coach and educator before a premature death at 45 from a heart attack--adds a little-known but fascinating chapter to the story of the integration of American sports. Wes Lukowsky
Copyright © American Library Association. All rights reserved

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Customer Reviews

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This book is an incredibly well written and well documented story that should be more widely read.
K. Otis
Written by highly educated and intelligent people the authors have approached the subject with diligence, energy, and passion.
Barton L. Kaufman
Rachel and Tom have put together facts that are wonderful and the book flows beautifully between authors.
Charles M. Hepp

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Barton L. Kaufman on May 3, 2006
Format: Hardcover
Tom Graham and Rachel Graham Cody have done a masterful job of writing a book that will be enjoyed by anyone with either an interest in basketball or an interest in what transpired in the civil rights movement after World War II. If the reader like myself has an interest in both subjects then this book will be among the most interesting books written on the subjects. Written by highly educated and intelligent people the authors have approached the subject with diligence, energy, and passion. While nearly every sports fan knows of Jackie Robinson, few people know of Bill Garrett and his journey from a segregated grammar school in a small Indiana town to national acclaim as an All American at Indiana University. I loved this book.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Forrest D. Theobald on April 20, 2006
Format: Hardcover
In Getting Open, Tom Graham and Rachel Graham Cody have certainly captured the uniqueness that is (or at least was) high school basketball in Indiana. But you do not have to be a basketball fan to enjoy the book. The real story is the compelling, socially-significant humanity of Bill Garrett, a young man with dreams larger than society wanted to allow. With heart and compassion, the authors detail racial conflict and Bill Garrett's trailblazing triumph. This is a very good read and I recommend it for everyone.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Peggy Cliadakis on April 23, 2006
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Because I'm from Bill Garrett's hometown, I thought I was familiar with his achievements. Not so. This book combines the elements of basketball, civil rights, and a cast of fascinating and determined characters with the story of how one small town's attitudes about race led to a revolution in Big 10 basketball and a contribution to the civil rights movement. . A great read that is not just for sports fans.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By K. Otis on August 6, 2006
Format: Hardcover
This book is an incredibly well written and well documented story that should be more widely read. It is an important history that many sports fans, and non-sports fans, will enjoy tremendously. It is an inspiration to us all, and offers many lessons and insights about overcoming racism. Thank you to the father-daughter authors for getting out this story!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Charles M. Hepp on July 3, 2009
Format: Hardcover
With Tom Graham as an associate and having grown up in Shelbyville, the book is a "gem" and brings back a lot of memories. Rachel and Tom have put together facts that are wonderful and the book flows beautifully between authors.
C. M.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Jakinser on December 21, 2008
Format: Paperback
It was great to re-live the "glory days" of 1947, and winning the
"State". It was sad and enlightening to read of all the racial
problems our team went through. And, even more so to read of all
Bill Garrett went through later. He was an inspiring, good person,
besides being a basketball star and hero.
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