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Getting Played: African American Girls, Urban Inequality, and Gendered Violence 1St Edition Edition

4.3 out of 5 stars 6 customer reviews
ISBN-13: 978-0814756980
ISBN-10: 0814756980
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Editorial Reviews

Review

“The result of Miller’s information lode is a sometimes uplifting book. It is possible for government and private-sector programs to alleviate the violence against females, Miller believes—but not if those in charge lack the will and refuse to allocate the resources.”
-St. Louis Post Dispatch



“In Getting Played, sociologist Jody Miller presents a compelling picture of this dire social problem and explains how inextricably and tragically, linked violence is to their daily lives in poor urban neighborhoods.”

-Harlem Book Fair

“Miller’s analysis is spot-on and sensitive, illuminating the oft overseen effects and workings of privilege . . . she does a great job at showing how large societal forces have very real, individual, and private consequences.”
-Feminist Review



“Miller gives us a detailed examination of the violence experienced by Black inner city girls whose victimization is based on multiple dimensions of their lives: because they are Black, because they live in extremely disadvantaged neighborhoods, and because they are women. Miller’s careful, rich, detailed field work documents and analyzes the complex realities of these young women’s lives that set the context for the struggles they routinely contend with. The voices of these young people have been ignored for too long. Getting Played has given them an opportunity to be heard that is long overdue.”

-Robert Crutchfield,University of Washington



“It offers an in-depth examination of how class, race, gender, and educational inequalities place young African American girls in positions of powerlessness as they navigate an urban terrain that glorifies patriarchy and machismo. Getting Played is an eye-opening, emotional roller coaster that will capture your attention and heart from the first page.”

-The Journal of African American History



“In Getting Played, sociologist Jody Miller presents a compelling picture of this dire social problem and explores how inextricably, and tragically, linked violence is to their daily lives in poor urban neighborhoods.”

-QBR,The Black Book Review

“This is a significant and timely book. Miller has taken on a vitally important, but understudied, topic—violence against young Black girls in economically depressed urban settings.”
-Dana M. Britton,author of At Work in the Iron Cage: The Prison as Gendered Organization



“Miller’s analysis is spot-on and sensitive, illuminating the oft overseen effects and workings of privilege.”
-Feminist Review



“Miller grabs readers’ attention with the stark reality of the widespread occurrence of violent victimization among the girls she studies.”
-From the Foreword by Ruth D. Peterson,Distinguished Professor of Social and Behavioral Sciences, The Ohio State University



“By giving us a better understanding of how the neighborhoods and the peer culture of poor African American youth increase the risk of gendered victimization, Getting Played challenges both academics and policymakers to face the role of structured discrimination in the perpetuation of violence toward women.”

-Candace Kruttschnitt,co-author of Marking Time in the Golden State: Women's Imprisonment in California

Getting Played shows powerfully how gender, class, and race inequality expose girls in disadvantaged urban communities to violent and sexual victimization, both in neighborhoods and in schools. Miller expertly analyzes how extreme social and economic disadvantage combine with pervasive normative codes to create a context in which girls face high risks of victimization at the hands of boys and men. Getting Played is masterful.”

-Karen Heimer,co-editor of Gender and Crime: Patterns in Victimization and Offending

About the Author

Jody Miller is Professor in the Department of Criminology and Criminal Justice, University of Missouri, St. Louis. She is the author of One of the Guys: Girls, Gangs, and Gender and recipient of the 2001 Ruth Shonle Cavan Young Scholar Award from the American Society of Criminology.

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 312 pages
  • Publisher: NYU Press; 1St Edition edition (March 1, 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0814756980
  • ISBN-13: 978-0814756980
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 0.7 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 15.2 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (6 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #306,215 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
Jody Miller, an Associate Professor at the Department of Criminology and Criminal Justice at the University of Missouri-St. Louis, set out to provide an analysis of violence against young women in urban communities. Her study considers the perspectives of the youth on violence and gender and documents, in gripping and often harrowing detail, the circumstances and patterns of behaviors. It also attempts to analyze the ideas that both young girls and boys use to explain their behavior.

Getting Played is a carefully crafted study that used multiple methodologies and a comparative research design. The study collected data from various sources: in-depth interviews with young African Americans in disadvantaged St. Louis neighborhoods, surveys with these youths, and supplemental information on the characteristics of the neighborhoods.

The study is comparative in two ways: First, the study interviewed both young women and young men about their perceptions of and exposure to violence against young women. Interviews with females and males allow for gender based comparisons, which provided an opportunity to examine similarities and differences across gender in the respondents' ideologies about gender and their interpretations of incidents of violence against women.

Second, the study included both female and male youths, who were engaged in ongoing serious delinquency as well as youths from the same communities who were not.

Miller studied African American youths because she wanted to fill a vacuum in the literature that tends to overlook adolescent girls (young African American women in particular), especially those living in highly distressed urban neighborhoods.
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This book helped me understand the many facets of gendered violence that I oftentimes hear about among female youth work with. Miller's cogent description of the sexual violence and harassment experienced in the setting where she works and the lack of acknowledgement among the girls to recognize structural factors related to this violence is a point too few scholars write about in similar work. It is a sympathetic analysis of the challenges faced in these types of communities and potential solutions to address these issues. I wish I read this sooner!
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By Jada on February 12, 2016
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I just wish it didn't sound like textbook
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