Automotive Holiday Deals Books Holiday Gift Guide Shop Men's Athletic Shoes Learn more nav_sap_plcc_6M_fly_beacon $5 Albums egg_2015 All-New Amazon Fire TV Beauty Deals Martha Stewart American Made Amazon Gift Card Offer minions minions minions  Amazon Echo Starting at $84.99 Kindle Black Friday Deals Shop Now HTL

Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your email address or mobile phone number.

Audible Sample

Getting Things Done: The Art of Stress-Free Productivity Audible – Unabridged

1,737 customer reviews

See all 27 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
New from Used from
"Please retry"
Audible, Unabridged
"Please retry"
Free with your Audible trial

Listen on your Kindle Fire or with the free Audible app on Apple, Android, and Windows devices.

Free with Audible trial
Buy with 1-Click

Sold and delivered by Audible, an Amazon company

Editorial Reviews

In today's world of exponentially increased communication and responsibility, yesterday's methods for staying on top just don't work. Veteran management consultant and trainer David Allen recognizes that "time management" is useless the minute your schedule is interrupted; "setting priorities" isn't relevant when your e-mail is down; "procrastination solutions" won't help if your goals aren't clear.

Allen's premise is simple: our ability to be productive is directly proportional to our ability to relax. Only when our minds are clear and our thoughts are organized can we achieve stress-free productivity and unleash our creative potential. He teaches us how to:

  • Apply the "do it, delegate it, defer it, drop it" rule to get your in-box empty.
  • Reassess goals and stay focused in changing situations.
  • Overcome feelings of confusion, anxiety, and being overwhelmed.
  • Feel fine about what you're not doing.

    From core principles to proven tricks, Getting Things Done has the potential to transform the way you work - and the way you experience work. At any level of implementation, David Allen's entertaining and thought-provoking advice shows you how to pick up the pace without wearing yourself down.
  • ©2002 David Allen, All Rights Reserved; (P)2008 Simon and Schuster Inc., SOUND IDEAS Is an Imprint of Simon and Schuster Audio Division, Simon and Schuster Inc.

    Product Details

    • Audible Audio Edition
    • Listening Length: 7 hours and 8 minutes
    • Program Type: Audiobook
    • Version: Unabridged
    • Publisher: Simon & Schuster Audio
    • Release Date: January 15, 2008
    • Language: English
    • ASIN: B0012OMFHY
    • Amazon Best Sellers Rank:

    Customer Reviews

    Most Helpful Customer Reviews

    1,829 of 1,917 people found the following review helpful By T on January 9, 2001
    Format: Hardcover
    OK, first I have to admit I picked up the book at a local Border's where I had a copy on reserve. Having said that... I think I've tried every 'system' for organizing yourself out there. In the 80's it was Day-Timer and Day-Runner. Good calenders and address books, but not much else. 90's was Covey, and Franklin planning. Now we have 'roles and goals' which helps with long term planning but both systems were very inflexible when it came to planning your day to day stuff. I can remember Covey wanting me to plan out my entire week in advance. Nice in theory, but nowhere near reality for those of us whose jobs tend to be more 'crisis-oriented'. I've also tried Agenda, Ecco, Outlook, etc. but its hard to lug around your PC or laptop all the time. About two years ago I came across David Allen's tape seminar and I have to say its the best system I've ever found for organizing 'all' of your life. I can't say it's changed my life (I still have the same job, wife and kids and I still procrastinate too much <g>) but its certainly made all the difference in me being finally, actually organized on day-to-day basis. I'm now the only one in my office with a clean desk :)
    The book covers just about the same material that I learned in the tape series. The tapes have more anecdotes and 'real-life' examples in them, but the book has a few new pearls and tricks that tells me David's been refining and polishing this system since the tape series.
    Two last quick points: first, it requires no special binders or refills. You could use a cheap spiral notebook if you want. Personally, I use a palmpilot, which works well. Second, (IMHO) the Weekly Review is the cornerstone of making this system work, and its worked for me for two years. Remember that; it'll make sense once you read the book :) Now if I could only get David to come up with a system for procrastination....
    19 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
    Thank you for your feedback.
    Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
    Report abuse
    1,438 of 1,511 people found the following review helpful By J. Lebar on June 5, 2006
    Format: Paperback
    David Allen presents an awesome organizational system in this book. With just a little up-front effort, anyone really can become much more in control of his or her life. I wouldn't say that GDT has changed my life, but I'm definitely less stressed now that I follow the system.

    The only problem is, Getting Things Done is terribly painful to read. The problem stems mainly from the fact that there are about fifty pages in the book that contain real information. The other two hundred pages are--no joke--almost word-for-word rehash of those fifty pages. If I had a dime for every time Allen wrote, "Your brain is like a computer. If you fill up its RAM with the things you have to do, you don't get anything done," I seriously would have recouped my investment in this book. I didn't appreciate that I had to search through the entire book to find just a few pages of original wisdom.

    If you're interested in this system--and, again, the system really is great--I recommend you check the book out at your local library. If you later feel as though you need the book as a reference, you can always buy it. And if you do read this book, don't feel bad if you skip most of the introduction and all of the last section (which read almost like a fifty page ad for David Allen's consulting services) and if you skim most of the rest. I promise: You're not missing much.
    25 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
    Thank you for your feedback.
    Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
    Report abuse
    1,091 of 1,148 people found the following review helpful By Donald Mitchell HALL OF FAMETOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on January 15, 2001
    Format: Hardcover
    This book is for all those who are overwhelmed with too many things to do, too little time to do them, and a general sense of unease that something important is being missed.
    Everyone has experienced times when everything seemed effortless, and progress limitless. David Allen has captured ways for you to achieve that wonderful state of mind and consciousness more often.
    His key concept is that every task, promise, or assignment has a place and a time. With everything in its proper place and time, you feel in control and replace the time spent on vague worrying with effective, timely action. As a result, the accomplishments grow while the pressure to accomplish decreases. As a result, the book contains many insights into "how to have more energy, be more relaxed, and get a lot more accomplished with much less effort."
    The key psychological insight of this book is that rapid progress occurs when you take large, unformed tasks, and break them down and organize them into smaller, sequential steps for exactly what to do and when. The book provides lots of guidance and examples for how to do this.
    The book is organized into three sections. The first gives you an overview of the whole process for how to get more done in a relaxed way. The second spells out the details of how to implement that process, in a way that a personal coach might use. The third provides subtle insights that help you appreciate the benefits that follow from using the process. Like all good coaches, Mr. Allen understands that appreciating a subject from several perspectives and getting lots of practice with it are critical steps in learning.
    The process advocated by this book is described with lots of systems flow charts that will appeal to all of the engineers and left-brained people.
    Read more ›
    10 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
    Thank you for your feedback.
    Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
    Report abuse
    324 of 352 people found the following review helpful By Colvini on January 9, 2002
    Format: Hardcover
    I attended one of David's seminars in 1986. As a result, I was able to successfully manage 101 concurrent projects, finishing on time and under budget. Fast forward to 2001. I keep this book by my side at all times (David publish it in Ebook form so it's easier to carry!). The company I'm with now wonders how I get the "impossible" projects done. Using David's techniques in the book, it seems like I can complete a full work day in fewer hours because I know what all my "next actions" are, and do them promptly. Gives me a lot of worry free time.
    This is a book you "DO" not just read. Be prepared to work when you start out, but when the initial work is done, that's when the fun begins.
    I cleaned my inbox and email box of 300 items in less than 15 minutes, filtering out the junk, the things that needed immediate attention, and the "someday maybe" things (like buying my first Harley).
    This works for my personal life too. No more missed anniversaries, birthdays, phone calls, errands, etc.
    Do you ever think about work projects at home? Do you ever think about home projects when you're at the office? Ever worry about that phone call you need to make or that errand you need to run? Forget it! Get the book. It's awesome. Get the book - period. If you don't, you deserve your stress.
    2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
    Thank you for your feedback.
    Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
    Report abuse