Test Prep AP SAT GMAT MCAT Learn more Discover Test Prep Central
Getting to Maybe and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more

Sorry, this item is not available in
Image not available for
Color:
Image not available

To view this video download Flash Player

 


or
Sign in to turn on 1-Click ordering
Sell Us Your Item
For a $9.24 Gift Card
Trade in
More Buying Choices
Have one to sell? Sell yours here
Start reading Getting to Maybe on your Kindle in under a minute.

Don't have a Kindle? Get your Kindle here, or download a FREE Kindle Reading App.

Getting To Maybe: How to Excel on Law School Exams [Paperback]

by Richard Michael Fischl, Jeremy Paul
4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (99 customer reviews)

Buy New
$26.72 & FREE Shipping on orders over $35. Details
Rent
$15.75
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.
In Stock.
Rented by RentU and Fulfilled by Amazon.
Want it Monday, April 28? Choose One-Day Shipping at checkout. Details
Free Two-Day Shipping for College Students with Amazon Student

Formats

Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition $15.10  
Paperback $26.72  
Sell Us Your Books
Get up to 80% back when you sell us your books, even if you didn't buy them at Amazon. Learn more

Book Description

May 26, 1999 0890897603 978-0890897607 1
Professors Fischl and Paul explain law school exams in ways no one has before, all with an eye toward improving the reader's performance. The book begins by describing the difference between educational cultures that praise students for 'right answers,' and the law school culture that rewards nuanced analysis of ambiguous situations in which more than one approach may be correct. Enormous care is devoted to explaining precisely how and why legal analysis frequently produces such perplexing situations.

But the authors don't stop with mere description. Instead, Getting to Maybe teaches how to excel on law school exams by showing the reader how legal analysis can be brought to bear on examination problems. The book contains hints on studying and preparation that go well beyond conventional advice. The authors also illustrate how to argue both sides of a legal issue without appearing wishy-washy or indecisive. Above all, the book explains why exam questions may generate feelings of uncertainty or doubt about correct legal outcomes and how the student can turn these feelings to his or her advantage.

In sum, although the authors believe that no exam guide can substitute for a firm grasp of substantive material, readers who devote the necessary time to learning the law will find this book an invaluable guide to translating learning into better exam performance.

Frequently Bought Together

Getting To Maybe: How to Excel on Law School Exams + Law School Confidential: A Complete Guide to the Law School Experience: By Students, for Students + 1L of a Ride: A Well-Traveled Professor's Roadmap to Success in the First Year of Law School
Price for all three: $79.95

Buy the selected items together


Editorial Reviews

Review

This book should revolutionize the ordeal of studying for law school exams....It's clear, insightful, fun to read, and right on the money. --Duncan Kennedy, Carter Professor of General Jurisprudence, Harvard Law School

Finally a study aid that takes legal theory seriously....Students who master these lessons will surely write better exams. More importantly, they will also learn to be better lawyers. --Steven L. Winter, Brooklyn Law School

If you can't spot a 'fork in the law' or a 'fork in the facts' in an exam hypothetical, get this book. If you don't know how to play 'Czar of the Universe' on law school exams (or why), get this book. And if you do want to learn how to think like a lawyer - a good one - get this book. It's, quite simply, stone cold brilliant. --Pierre Schlag, University of Colorado School of Law (Law Preview Book Review on The Princeton Review website)

Finally a study aid that takes legal theory seriously....Students who master these lessons will surely write better exams. More importantly, they will also learn to be better lawyers. --Steven L. Winter, Brooklyn Law School

If you can't spot a 'fork in the law' or a 'fork in the facts' in an exam hypothetical, get this book. If you don't know how to play 'Czar of the Universe' on law school exams (or why), get this book. And if you do want to learn how to think like a lawyer - a good one - get this book. It's, quite simply, stone cold brilliant. --Pierre Schlag, University of Colorado School of Law (Law Preview Book Review on The Princeton Review website)

Finally a study aid that takes legal theory seriously....Students who master these lessons will surely write better exams. More importantly, they will also learn to be better lawyers. --Steven L. Winter, Brooklyn Law School

If you can't spot a 'fork in the law' or a 'fork in the facts' in an exam hypothetical, get this book. If you don't know how to play 'Czar of the Universe' on law school exams (or why), get this book. And if you do want to learn how to think like a lawyer - a good one - get this book. It's, quite simply, stone cold brilliant. --Pierre Schlag, University of Colorado School of Law (Law Preview Book Review on The Princeton Review website)

Finally a study aid that takes legal theory seriously....Students who master these lessons will surely write better exams. More importantly, they will also learn to be better lawyers. --Steven L. Winter, Brooklyn Law School

If you can't spot a 'fork in the law' or a 'fork in the facts' in an exam hypothetical, get this book. If you don't know how to play 'Czar of the Universe' on law school exams (or why), get this book. And if you do want to learn how to think like a lawyer - a good one - get this book. It's, quite simply, stone cold brilliant. --Pierre Schlag, University of Colorado School of Law (Law Preview Book Review on The Princeton Review website)

About the Author

Richard Michael Fischl is a professor of law at the University of Connectical School of Law. Jeremy Paul is Dean and Professor of Law at Northeastern University School of Law.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 348 pages
  • Publisher: Carolina Academic Press; 1 edition (May 26, 1999)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0890897603
  • ISBN-13: 978-0890897607
  • Product Dimensions: 0.8 x 5.2 x 8.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (99 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #4,120 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Authors

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews
90 of 100 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Secrets of Success are Secret No More July 26, 2000
Format:Paperback
Getting to Maybe is a Godsend. Even for those of you who've already finished first-year, it's well worth getting.
I am the author of Planet Law School: What You Need to Know Before You Go--but Didn't Know to Ask. Unfortunately, Getting to Maybe was first published in 1999, a year after PLS, so I could not recommend it in PLS. Hence this posting, now. Even though the authors and I are competitors, and our books are published by different firms, I urge all law students to get Getting to Maybe. (For one thing, the authors' critique of the IRAC model is succinct and devastating.)
If you take doing well in law school (and becoming a good attorney) seriously, this book is a necessity.
It's so well-written that I had to force myself to put it down, and ended up reading it in just two sittings, of several hours each.
The earlier review, about the teaching of Tantric Yoga, in exactly right. With Getting to Maybe, the secrets are secret no more.
Was this review helpful to you?
29 of 30 people found the following review helpful
By A. Hall
Format:Paperback
In my first year of law school, my legal writing tutor recommended this book. After reading it, my grades went up, which I believe was partially because of how this book helped me improve writing law school exams. It helps new law students understand what it means to "think like a lawyer." That is, it gives students a framework for analyzing complex issues.

Reading this book also significantly increased my performance in our legal writing class. At the end of my first year, my professor said my writing went from nearly the worst in the class to the best. This progress was a direct result from reading this book, improving my writing organization, and practice.

I highly recommend this book for new law students who want a head-start improving their legal analysis skills, and especially for students struggling with their legal writing. Law students have so much to read, it's hard to find more time for a book like this. But even reading a few chapters will provide students with a new paradigm for their legal analysis and writing.

This book would make a great gift for a student prior to starting law school because it is easy to read and introduces readers to subjects they will cover in their first-year courses.
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
92 of 106 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Impressive rigor July 18, 2002
Format:Paperback
The aim of this book is to help current law students perform well on law school exams. Law school exams are famously ambiguous; hence the title of the book.
The title of the book is a play on the title of a classic book about the art of negotiation, called _Getting to Yes_. Implicit in _Getting to Maybe_ is that, unlike a negotiation, performance on law school exams does not require an exact answer or resolution.
The method by which these law professors explain this concept is especially interesting. In connection with their academic research, they propose to break down law school exams into small components, and thoroughly analyze those components. The result is a very substantial and comprehensive analysis of the structure of law school exams and the skills required to do well on these exams.
You may be asking how the professors purport to explain _all_ law school exams, for surely there are professors for whose exams these methods will not work. These professors make the interesting point that in the United States, law education is fairly uniform, and, therefore, the skills required to perform well on law school exams are fairly uniform, as well.
I read this book prior to starting law school. I found it useful primarily because I have read a number of other books about legal reasoning and the study of law and the law school experience that are more basic than the material in this book. If this is your first book regarding the study of law or peformance in law school, I would advise putting it aside in favor of a book offering a broader overview of law, its study, and law school.
Was this review helpful to you?
80 of 94 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Expensive and Not Helpful November 12, 2005
Format:Paperback
I read this book early in the fall of my 1L year. At the time, I thought that the book was useful and that reading it would give me an edge over my classmates. In retrospect, the book did not give me any edge and reading the book was a waste of time.

The book does give you confidence. It leads you to think that you will be able to take apart a legal exam, reduce it to its essentials, and reason in a manner that your professors will appreciate. I guess it might be worth your reading if you need a shot of self-confidence.

But I do not think that the book will make much of a difference in how anyone does on law school exams. The authors' main point is to look for ambiguities (or "forks"). When you see something on your exam that looks ambiguous, try to explore all the ambiguities. In other words, argue in the alternative--i.e., point out that if X is said to occur, then Y results, whereas if A is said to occur, then B results. Let your professors know that you can see the little things that might produce completely different legal results.

This method is great as a theory. However, it is difficult to apply the method in an actual test setting. I remember that my first exam during my 1L year was in criminal law. I was given a long fact pattern, and I tried to apply the "Getting to Maybe" method. One problem I found was that I was pushed for time. It was not possible to discuss all the ambiguities in the amount of time allowed. The method the book suggested was just not possible in the context of my three-hour bluebook exam. There was no way I could explore all the ambiguities on the exam the way the authors suggest.

Another problem I have with the book is that it is not really giving you any special advice.
Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you?
Most Recent Customer Reviews
1.0 out of 5 stars Interesting Book Marred by Poor Structure
The author opens with a problem question. He fails to lay down one of the most elementary requirements for working with law, namely to identify the relevant or potentially legal... Read more
Published 2 months ago by Christopher S. Enright
5.0 out of 5 stars Great book.
I wish I read this book sooner. It would have helped me a great deal on my first few exams. It covered everything I wasn't taught in law school.
Published 3 months ago by A person
5.0 out of 5 stars Essential for 1L
I bought this book and started reading it before law school and I was lost and stopped after the first 30 pages. Read more
Published 3 months ago by A. Gift For You
4.0 out of 5 stars Review
Easy, quick read. Recommend for anyone having trouble with essay writing for law school final exams. Best applied through practice before the exam.
Published 3 months ago by DJ Dawson
5.0 out of 5 stars A must read/buy for Law Students
Bought this book the Spring before my 1st semester of Law School. It definitely put things into perspective, as well as offered great advice on a variety of topics. Read more
Published 4 months ago by Sela & Preston Nakai
5.0 out of 5 stars Enjoyable Read
We will see how effective it was once I get my grades back, but it was insightful and I highly recommend it.
Published 4 months ago by Stellanova
4.0 out of 5 stars Great Book
A friend recommended this to me, and as a new law student it is going to be a big help. Haven't gotten through it yet but I've read the first few chapters. Read more
Published 5 months ago by Caroline San
5.0 out of 5 stars A Great Balance for the IRAC Dynasty
I'm about 10% of the way through this book at time of reviewing, and I'm quite enjoying it. It was recommended to me by my Contracts professor, and promises to be full of... Read more
Published 6 months ago by AnonReed
5.0 out of 5 stars Great book!
I actually have not finished it yet, and I am still in my first month of law school. I began reading this book a few weeks before school started, and it changed my thought... Read more
Published 7 months ago by Zac
4.0 out of 5 stars This book was Helpful but not inspiring
This book was helpful to understand the strategy behind taking law school exams. I didn't finish the book feeling inspired or overly confident about taking exams but I feel like I... Read more
Published 7 months ago by Elaine Smith
Search Customer Reviews
Only search this product's reviews
ARRAY(0xa29d54b0)


Forums

There are no discussions about this product yet.
Be the first to discuss this product with the community.
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 



Look for Similar Items by Category


Want to discover more products? You may find many from online vocational schools shopping list.