Getting to Yes: Negotiating Agreement Without Giving In and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Buy New
$9.07
Qty:1
  • List Price: $16.00
  • Save: $6.93 (43%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Getting to Yes: Negotiati... has been added to your Cart
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 3 images

Getting to Yes: Negotiating Agreement Without Giving In Paperback – May 3, 2011


See all 7 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$9.07
$6.95 $2.67
Best%20Books%20of%202014
$9.07 FREE Shipping on orders over $35. In Stock. Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.


Frequently Bought Together

Getting to Yes: Negotiating Agreement Without Giving In + Getting Past No: Negotiating in Difficult Situations + Difficult Conversations: How to Discuss What Matters Most
Price for all three: $29.78

Buy the selected items together

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Year
Best Books of 2014
Looking for something great to read? Browse our editors' picks for 2014's Best Books of the Year in fiction, nonfiction, mysteries, children's books, and much more.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 240 pages
  • Publisher: Penguin Books; Revised edition (May 3, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0143118757
  • ISBN-13: 978-0143118756
  • Product Dimensions: 5.2 x 0.7 x 7.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 5.6 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (259 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #984 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Roger Fisher is the Samuel Williston Professor of Law Emeritus and director emeritus of the Harvard Negotiation Project.

William Ury cofounded the Harvard Negotiation Project and is the award-winning author of several books on negotiation.

Bruce Patton is cofounder and Distinguished Fellow of the Harvard Negotiation Project and the author of Difficult Conversations, a New York Times bestseller.

Customer Reviews

Very informative and easy to read.
Laura
I recommend this book to anyone learning negotiation skills .
gene
Everyone can use help with their negotiating skills.
MsChanel

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

69 of 70 people found the following review helpful By Lisa Shea HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on July 2, 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
The title of Fisher and Ury's book is Getting to Yes - Negotiating Agreement without Giving In. It's a case where the title clearly lays out what the book is about. In Getting to Yes the authors present, step by step, how to find your way to a win-win solution that helps meet your goals while at the same time preserving the relationship so that future negotiations also go smoothly.

This book was the assigned textbook for a college course I took on negotiation, but it's one of those fairly rare cases where the material that's useful for a college course is also immensely useful for off-the-street people in a variety of situations. This book avoids complicated jargon and long, droning background chapters. Instead, it plunges into helpful information to assist people in negotiating for a new car, negotiating issues with their landlords, and all the many ways we all negotiate for our position throughout life.

Negotiation isn't just for union leaders trying to avert a strike. All of us negotiate each day as we try to juggle our many roles. We negotiate with our co-workers over assignments. We negotiate with our family members over chores. In an ideal world all of those discussions would go quickly, smoothly, and with as little strife as possible.

Getting to Yes provided numerous helpful examples which made their points more easy to understand. It is so true that people tend to remember stories where they might not remember dry text. When I think about this book I do remember several of the stories clearly, and those help to represent the points the authors were making. The stories help remind me to focus on the issues when negotiating and to look for objective standards to work with.

The information presented is wonderful, and immediately useful in life.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
37 of 37 people found the following review helpful By Marry Jane on November 16, 2014
Format: Kindle Edition
Whether you're a high-profile diplomatic official or just a burger flipper, the fact remains that we all negotiate at one point or another. Our negotiations may not be based on matters of life and death or foreign policy, but they do create actionable effects in our professional and personal life. Getting to Yes is a must-read for anyone who needs a better understanding of negotiation tactics. If you find yourself constantly making compromises that negatively affect your desired outcomes, then this book will help you. Again, this book will help virtually anyone as negotiation is a universal constant in everyone's lives. The book lays at a simple, step-by-step action plan for negotiating at higher level. Whether you're looking for a pay raise or just some leeway with your significant other, this book will help you get what you want without feeling like you get the short end of the stick every time.

Of course, negotiation strategies work only if you believe in what you're doing and believe in yourself. I picked up 21 Things You Should Give Up To Be Happy recently and it's helped me personally and in my negotiations. Part of negotiating is not worrying about what other people think of you. If you are overly concerned with how you appear, then you aren't going to become a good negotiator. One of the 21 Things You Should Give Up To Be Happy is actually caring about what people think about you. Someone's opinion of you should not affect your opinion of yourself. If you base your entire self-worth on other people's opinions, then you are doomed for a life of being stepped on and stepped over.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
25 of 25 people found the following review helpful By Allan M. Lees on September 23, 2012
Format: Paperback
There are a few books that have such relevance to so many aspects of daily life that they should be on everyone's "must read" list, and this is one of them. Although at first it might seem that this is merely one more addition to the seemingly endless pile of platitudinous self-help books that crowd the bookshelves and deliver little or no real worth, in fact this book is a highly pragmatic text on the process of negotiation. The authors don't pretend that negotiating will get you everything you want - in fact they are very clear on the limitations of negotiation and how to think of negotiation as a process that has strict boundaries. What the book does is make explicit the nature of negotiation, the types of tactics people commonly use, and the most competent method for pursuing negotiations so as to maximize the possibility of achieving a negotiated outcome both parties can live with. The text is clear, the examples simple to grasp, and the conceptual framework adequately developed. Nowadays we might add some learning that evolutionary psychology has provided, but aside from that this is a superb book that can enable enhanced outcomes in most realms of life, from family conflicts through business negotiations to community issues. The entire book can be read and absorbed in less than two hours, but the lessons can be applied over a lifetime.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
18 of 18 people found the following review helpful By Houman Tamaddon on October 7, 2011
Format: Paperback
After reading Roger Dawson's "Secrets of Power Negotiating" (another outstanding book, by the way), I did not expect to learn much new material from this book. I was wrong - "Getting to Yes" offers a new approach to negotiating. As the authors point out, we negotiate constantly in our daily lives. Most of us are unaware of the times we negotiate with our friends, coworkers, and family. What this book teaches readers is to how to go about resolving conflicts in an unemotional and logical way. Much of the advice here is given in the context of negotiating, but interestingly it could have easily been positioned as a book on influence. The material here reminded me of Dale Carnegies' "How to Win Friends and Influence People" (also a brilliant book).

I don't think that people should just read this book to get an advantage in negotiating. In fact, all sides would probably be mutually better off if they read this book. It advances civil society by promoting talk over violence and anger. I wonder why these books are not required reading for high school students. I certainly wish I had come across them when I was younger.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again