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63 of 64 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Great Information, Could Use Better Layout
The title of Fisher and Ury's book is Getting to Yes - Negotiating Agreement without Giving In. It's a case where the title clearly lays out what the book is about. In Getting to Yes the authors present, step by step, how to find your way to a win-win solution that helps meet your goals while at the same time preserving the relationship so that future negotiations also go...
Published on July 2, 2012 by Lisa Shea

versus
3.0 out of 5 stars A bit dated
Though I really liked the principles this book was trying to cover, I felt that the illustration and language used was very dated.
Published 1 month ago by Matt


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63 of 64 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Great Information, Could Use Better Layout, July 2, 2012
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This review is from: Getting to Yes: Negotiating Agreement Without Giving In (Paperback)
The title of Fisher and Ury's book is Getting to Yes - Negotiating Agreement without Giving In. It's a case where the title clearly lays out what the book is about. In Getting to Yes the authors present, step by step, how to find your way to a win-win solution that helps meet your goals while at the same time preserving the relationship so that future negotiations also go smoothly.

This book was the assigned textbook for a college course I took on negotiation, but it's one of those fairly rare cases where the material that's useful for a college course is also immensely useful for off-the-street people in a variety of situations. This book avoids complicated jargon and long, droning background chapters. Instead, it plunges into helpful information to assist people in negotiating for a new car, negotiating issues with their landlords, and all the many ways we all negotiate for our position throughout life.

Negotiation isn't just for union leaders trying to avert a strike. All of us negotiate each day as we try to juggle our many roles. We negotiate with our co-workers over assignments. We negotiate with our family members over chores. In an ideal world all of those discussions would go quickly, smoothly, and with as little strife as possible.

Getting to Yes provided numerous helpful examples which made their points more easy to understand. It is so true that people tend to remember stories where they might not remember dry text. When I think about this book I do remember several of the stories clearly, and those help to represent the points the authors were making. The stories help remind me to focus on the issues when negotiating and to look for objective standards to work with.

The information presented is wonderful, and immediately useful in life.

On the down side, this is a new version of older material. The authors chose to keep the initial book in its original form and then add on additional information at the end. I appreciate for historical reasons why they wanted to do that. However, from a fresh reader point of view, I feel they should present an integrated whole which most clearly presents the full information. The way the book is laid out currently, you have to go back and forth to find all information on a given topic.

Also, the format is not laid out for easy reference. If they went more for a "dummies" style with an easy to scan layout, graphs and charts to quickly find and scan, and quick end-summaries, that would make this more useful as a reference book to keep on a shelf. Right now if I had an issue to handle it would be less than quick to grab the book and find the answer. I would have to wade through the book to figure out where to get the support I needed.

Still, I do recommend that everyone read this book at least once, to build their skills in negotiation. It's something we all have to do!
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19 of 19 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Must-Read Book, September 23, 2012
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This review is from: Getting to Yes: Negotiating Agreement Without Giving In (Paperback)
There are a few books that have such relevance to so many aspects of daily life that they should be on everyone's "must read" list, and this is one of them. Although at first it might seem that this is merely one more addition to the seemingly endless pile of platitudinous self-help books that crowd the bookshelves and deliver little or no real worth, in fact this book is a highly pragmatic text on the process of negotiation. The authors don't pretend that negotiating will get you everything you want - in fact they are very clear on the limitations of negotiation and how to think of negotiation as a process that has strict boundaries. What the book does is make explicit the nature of negotiation, the types of tactics people commonly use, and the most competent method for pursuing negotiations so as to maximize the possibility of achieving a negotiated outcome both parties can live with. The text is clear, the examples simple to grasp, and the conceptual framework adequately developed. Nowadays we might add some learning that evolutionary psychology has provided, but aside from that this is a superb book that can enable enhanced outcomes in most realms of life, from family conflicts through business negotiations to community issues. The entire book can be read and absorbed in less than two hours, but the lessons can be applied over a lifetime.
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14 of 14 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Should be required reading for life, October 7, 2011
This review is from: Getting to Yes: Negotiating Agreement Without Giving In (Paperback)
After reading Roger Dawson's "Secrets of Power Negotiating" (another outstanding book, by the way), I did not expect to learn much new material from this book. I was wrong - "Getting to Yes" offers a new approach to negotiating. As the authors point out, we negotiate constantly in our daily lives. Most of us are unaware of the times we negotiate with our friends, coworkers, and family. What this book teaches readers is to how to go about resolving conflicts in an unemotional and logical way. Much of the advice here is given in the context of negotiating, but interestingly it could have easily been positioned as a book on influence. The material here reminded me of Dale Carnegies' "How to Win Friends and Influence People" (also a brilliant book).

I don't think that people should just read this book to get an advantage in negotiating. In fact, all sides would probably be mutually better off if they read this book. It advances civil society by promoting talk over violence and anger. I wonder why these books are not required reading for high school students. I certainly wish I had come across them when I was younger.
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23 of 27 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A must read for those involved in community issues, June 28, 2012
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This review is from: Getting to Yes: Negotiating Agreement Without Giving In (Paperback)
The premise of Getting to Yes is relatively simple; in essence the traditional view of negotiation (as a game of "give and take" between parties) is largely unproductive and can shatter working relationships between parties. Under this traditional view, parties are forced to choose between hardline negotiations (where you attempt to force your desired outcome) and softline negotiation (where you make extreme concessions in order to preserve the relationship). The authors offer a new outlook (referred to as "principled negotiation") where all parties work to make objective and rational statements about their desired outcomes (including providing empirical reasoning for their desired outcome). This new approach (summarized in the Appendix) removes the oppositional/adversarial outlook of negotiation and works to find creative solutions which satisfy the needs of all parties involved.

The model proposed is easy to use. The first step involves detaching personal politics from negotiation. Through making the negotiation about the issue at hand, the authors claim that relationships are more likely to be preserved regardless of the outcome of the negotiation. A major element of removing personal politics from the negotiation is to focus on personal interest rather than a hard position. Expressing personal interest in more lucid terms rather than abbreviated and absolute terms (e.g. "I would like to be able to sell the house and have a capital gain that would allow me to put 20% on house X" rather than "I would like to get $160,000 for the house") allows both parties to understand the interest at play and to work to explore mutually beneficial outcomes. In addition to expressing personal interests, the authors also insist that the terms of the negotiation be expressed in objective terms (i.e. when negotiating the house price an offer would be based off of the same quantitative/qualitative comparisons used in an appraisal). Instead of throwing out arbitrary figures in order to whittle a party up or down, each party must justify their request with some particular objective fact.

As the authors conclude the book, they provide a set of "Frequently Asked Questions" that they've received since publishing the first edition of the text. Each of the questions delve into more specific detail regarding how to employ the techniques in situations where power imbalances may be at place or one party simply refuses to negotiate.

Overall, the authors use the bulk of the text to compare and contrast traditional negotiation styles with their proposed "principled" negotiation technique.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Easy, informative read by Negotiation gurus, September 8, 2013
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I learned a lot and enjoyed reading this book, which is a nice combination. I have also read other books and scholarly articles that reference these authors repeatedly, so it makes me feel like these ones are pretty credible
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Essential Reading, February 9, 2012
By 
D. Corbin "Seeker" (Santa Monica, CA USA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Getting to Yes: Negotiating Agreement Without Giving In (Paperback)
This isn't just about Negotiating. Its more about learning how to identify a person's underlying concerns. Surfacing those are essential to moving a discussion forward. Arguments result and discussions stall when each side's real (underlying) concerns are threatened or remain unaddressed/un-surfaced. In short, if you could benefit from solving conflicts and gaining more alignment (at home, work or elsewhere), this is simply a must-read. It's a classic.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Glad I found this book, April 18, 2012
My boss bought this book for my entire team and it was required reading. I wasn't looking forward to it because I thought it would be your run of the mill boring book on negotiating. I was wrong about that. This book is full of good information that can be used immediately in any number of situations. Getting past No section was great. I recommend it to anyone who needs to negotiate something, which is pretty much everyone.

Another good negotiation/persuasion book is:

Difficult Situations: How to Turn Arguments Into Victories (The Leadership Series)
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Terrific Book on Negotiating, September 9, 2013
This review is from: Getting to Yes: Negotiating Agreement Without Giving In (Paperback)
Getting to Yes is a book well worth reading. It presents sage advice on how to unlock opposing parties and moving to successful mediation through a variety of arenas. The authors put forth solid, experienced-based approaches that can draw conflicting agendas on to common turf. He denigrates much of the traditional approaches to negotiation and dispute resolution and shows step-by-step processes about how to focus on individual interests rather than cement ourselves down to opposing positions. He suggests that using an objective criteria is much longer lasting and brings faster resolution than trying to get someone to change their mind and feelings about a conflict. The authors' experience ranges from negotiations with business disputes, family matters, to international terrorist dispute resolution.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Common sense rules, July 14, 2013
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As the author points out toward the end of the book, many comments he got from seasoned professional negotiators were along the line of 'now I know that what I do is the right thing'.

The book gives a framework for a fact-based, goal-oriented negotiation strategy that allows to settle disputes and differences of opinions without seeing the other side as 'the enemy'. Many of the points raised in the book probably strike most of the readers as somewhat common sense, but the value of the book is that it puts all these points together and embeds them in a well defined and coherent strategy.

I'd given 5 stars if the book had a few more practical examples and 'recipes', but it still makes a very good read.
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6 of 8 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A Good Systemic Analysis of What Every Good Negotiator Already Knows, January 6, 2012
By 
Jiang Xueqin (Toronto, Canada) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Getting to Yes: Negotiating Agreement Without Giving In (Paperback)
There are no secrets to negotiating, but it is an art form. You need to exercise total self-control, suppress your ego, and focus on the task at hand. You need to empathize with the side you're negotiating with, and figure out how to best arrive at a mutually satisfactory agreement. You need to hold firm, while at the same time understanding that reaching an agreement is what's important, and that ultimately everything can and need be sacrificed in order to reach an agreement, because the consequences of not reaching an agreement are unbearable -- and that takes a firm hold of reality.

None of this is particularly surprising to anyone with any negotiating experience (which is to say anyone with any experience), but what this book does is offer a systematic overview of good negotiating technique. Where this book lacks is good story-telling and examples -- as readers we need lots and lots of examples in order to make the lessons here concrete and memorable.
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Getting to Yes: Negotiating Agreement Without Giving In
Getting to Yes: Negotiating Agreement Without Giving In by Bruce Patton (Paperback - May 3, 2011)
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