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Ghazal Games: Poems Paperback – June 28, 2011


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 80 pages
  • Publisher: Ohio University Press; 1 edition (June 28, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0821419501
  • ISBN-13: 978-0821419502
  • Product Dimensions: 8.7 x 5.5 x 0.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,736,148 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

In his new collection of poetry, Roger Sedarat strikes the perfect balance between Eastern and Western expression, between the modern and the medieval, and between the sacred and the profane. A delight on every page, one can’t help but imagine that if Hafez, Rumi, and other Sufi mystic poets — even Goethe — were transported to the twenty–first century, their tweets might read something like this.
 
    Hooman Majd — author of The Ayatollahs’ Democracy: An Iranian Challenge
 


These poems are to be savored in their audacity — in turn witty, erotic, ludic, learned, engaged. Roger Sedarat’s ghazals bridge the form’s (and the poet’s) Persian sources to American demotic language, and open couplet windows on transnational reality.
 
 Marilyn Hacker — winner of the National Book Award and author of Names: Poems
 


Ghazal Games overflows with intelligent charm: its well-formed couplets, fueled by iconoclasm, are blessed with clarity, goodheartedness, pizzazz, and prankishness. Let’s crown Roger Sedarat the king of Carnival; long may he reign.

 
Wayne Koestenbaum — author of Best–Selling Jewish Porn Films
 

About the Author

Roger Sedarat is an assistant professor in the MFA program at Queens College. He is the recipient of scholarships to the Bread Loaf Writers’ Conference as well as a St. Botolph Society poetry grant. He is the author of Dear Regime, and his verse has appeared in such journals as New England Review, Atlanta Review, and Poet Lore.


More About the Author

Roger Sedarat is the author of Dear Regime: Letters to the Islamic Republic, which won Ohio University Press's Hollis Summers' Prize, and Ghazal Games (Ohio UP, 2011). In addition to teaching creative writing (poetry and literary translation) in the MFA program at Queens College, City University of New York, he teaches and writes on such academic interests as 19th and 20th century American literature as well as Middle Eastern-American literature. Currently, Roger is working toward translating a full-length collection of ghazals by the 14th century Sufi Persian poet, Hafez.

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

By John McGreivey on February 19, 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This is a fun read.

In these poems, Roger Sedarat is funny, clever, sometimes poignant, and frequently entertainingly caustic. He twists the ghazal form around for the fun of it. and says things about life and memory. The poems seem effortlessly tossed off, and yet they can't be (can they)?

Anyone (not just poemheads) can read this without feeling poetrified.

Read it. Now.
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