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Ghetto Freaks/Way Out


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Frequently Bought Together

Ghetto Freaks/Way Out + The Hooked Generation / The Psychedelic Priest (Special Edition)
Price for both: $19.78

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Product Details

  • Actors: Toni Ceo, Jim Coursar, Paul Elliot, Nick Kleinholz III, Gabe Lewis
  • Directors: Irvin S. Yeaworth Jr., Robert J. Emery
  • Writers: Robert J. Emery, Jean Yeaworth, John Gimenez, John Pappas, Rudy Nelson
  • Format: Multiple Formats, Black & White, Full Screen, NTSC, Special Edition
  • Language: English
  • Region: Region 1 (U.S. and Canada only. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.33:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Rated: Unrated
  • Studio: Image Entertainment
  • DVD Release Date: November 2, 2004
  • Run Time: 190 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B00063MBZS
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #123,618 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)
  • Learn more about "Ghetto Freaks/Way Out" on IMDb

Special Features

None.

Editorial Reviews

Hanging out at a late-sixties rock club, stoner-freak Sonny watches as a wealthy mother tries to "rescue" her daughter from the corrupting hippie environment. Acting quickly, Sonny slips the girl the address of his nearby House of Hippies and, moments later, she's taking her first LSD trip and having group sex on the floor! Sonny then shows her the joys of panhandling and the thrill of protesting in the park before some drug dealers remind everyone that reality really sucks.... Originally released as both Sign of Aquarius and Love Commune, this stoned-out slice of hippie life -- filmed in Cleveland of all places -- was rereleased as Ghetto Freaks courtesy of a bogus blaxploitation ad campaign and the addition of two minutes of new footage featuring the black leader of a kinky love cult. Plus: From Irvin S. Yeaworth, the director of The Blob, 4D Man and Dinosaurus, comes Way Out, an intense and surprisingly affecting story of Puerto Rican drug addicts in the Bronx. Frankie and Jim are best buddies who enjoy getting high until their addiction to heroin forces them to burrow through a harrowing underworld of fellow junkies, crime, and violence where their only goal is "to get that fix, get that fix...." With a cast comprised entirely of real-life former addicts -- who break character at the end to provide a startling and hopeful coda -- "this is a crazy Way Out world which squares just won't believe...."

Customer Reviews

3.7 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Brian T VINE VOICE on July 30, 2009
Something Weird's typically garish sleeve design and sensationalistic copy don't really do these two topical films justice. In fact, in the case of WAY OUT (1967), based on a stage play by reformed junkie John Giminez (who also plays a role in the film), it would seem history itself has also not done the film justice, consigning it to the dustbin of reformed junkie pictures until Something Weird rescued it from an undeserved oblivion.

Though ostensibly the second feature on Something Weird's double bill, WAY OUT is actually the more important film cinematically and perhaps historically, utilizing as it does a largely Puerto Rican cast of real-life former heroin addicts who, surprisingly, are extremely capable performers. Their experiences clearly inform the characters they play, and while we're only given small hints about the kind of socio-economic conditions that might lead a young man (or woman) to start mainlining (the dingy New York boroughs in which the film was shot are a fairly obvious visual clue), we're spared no grisly detail of the chronic addiction cycle experienced by them once they do, and the lives and families they often destroy.

This is a film that would probably stand up to inclusion in the Criterion Collection, not so much for what it "says" (heroin is bad; nothing new there) but for how it dared to say it with an amateur cast in 1966, a time when most exploitation pictures dealing with drugs adopted one of two crackpot philosophies: a) junkies and hippies are evil and only the law, the government or the church can stop them (in films made by conservatives); or b) junkies and hippies are pacifist heroes, screwed over by the law, the government, the clergy or all three (films made by liberals).
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Low-Ranking Reviewer on July 11, 2009
Verified Purchase
Bought this on sale at $7 cause i'm sort of a fan of the exploitation/grindhouse genre, and because it was just enough to put me over the $25/free-shipping offer at Amazon. I should've been wary about buying since there are no reviews for this product. I had to count on the Amazon and IMDB summary to find out more about them. Now i know why.

Ghetto Freaks- not very exploitive, and worse, kinda annoying. You get to see hippies debate and philosophize, which is great if you like that sort of thing. It's not all bad as a few scenes are of interest but i found it mostly boring. (88 min. 1970, R)

Way Out- not really exploitive at all. I'll cut this movie some slack as the movie tries hard to get an anti-drug message across, and apparently all the performers are former drug-addicts(what it says on the back of the box anyway). Some good performances and scenes, but again, nothing really riveting to me. (102 min. 1966, unrated)

Extras-
* "digitally remastered and are presented in their original 1.33:1 aspect ratio"
* a handful of trailers for other similar-themed movies
* Narcotics-the inside story(classroom scare film for kids)

Even the extras are not worth multiple veiwings. Overall, not what i expected, and what i saw didn't really grab me in any way. Still, if you like movies about hippies and dramas about drug addicts, maybe worth a rental.
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By Jimmy Gibson on June 23, 2012
Verified Purchase
These movies are authentic! The stories though fictional portray the life of the hippies and drug addicts as they were.
The seller sent me the DVD in its "shrink wrap" brand new and on time!
Great Customer Service!
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