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19 of 19 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars 25 years...
Ghost in the Machine was the first Police album I owned. After 25yrs, it is still my favorite. The beginning of Secret Journey, with the building intro, would just blow my speakers apart when it kicked in!! Apparently, there was a jump in technology then, because this album seemed much more clearer and louder sounding than Zenyatta. After MTV started, the Every Little...
Published on November 8, 2006 by Paul Binder

versus
3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Multi-Channel or Stereo
If you are wondering if this SACD is Multi channel 5.1, its NOT.
The back says "SACD Stereo CD Audio".
The Audio CD sounds great but the rear and center speakers dont come up for bat in this format.
Published on December 3, 2011 by SACD listerner


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19 of 19 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars 25 years..., November 8, 2006
By 
Paul Binder (Clermont, Fl USA) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Ghost In The Machine [Digipak] (Audio CD)
Ghost in the Machine was the first Police album I owned. After 25yrs, it is still my favorite. The beginning of Secret Journey, with the building intro, would just blow my speakers apart when it kicked in!! Apparently, there was a jump in technology then, because this album seemed much more clearer and louder sounding than Zenyatta. After MTV started, the Every Little Thing She Does Is Magic video was on every hour. Sting, Andy, and Stewart seemed so "happy" in that video. That was part of the reason I got into them. They seemed to be having a great time making music and money. Ironically, years later, I learned that they were practically breaking up then! There were so many elements like group fighting, the dark songs, Sting's divorce, a different producer (Hugh) etc. Maybe the album should have been called "Demolition Band". Strangely, thats what makes Ghost in the Machine so much more unique to me. Despite all that, a great album was born, delivering excellent music to this day.
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30 of 33 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Yin Or Yang?, January 7, 2007
This review is from: Ghost In The Machine [Digipak] (Audio CD)
For me this is a far better album than "Zenyatta Mondatta." I even prefer it over "Synchronicity." Here the band is sour, relaxed, & robust. Some of their previous work seemed a little forced, but with these songs they appear to gel. I'll only focus on four of them. "Spirits In The Material World," is a cutting testament to the shallow material things that many view as essential to their momentary contentment. The reggae feel enlivens the somber mood. "Everything She Does Is Magic," is a spunky love song with a soaring bridge. "Invisible Sun," here Sting is at his sardonic best. His matter of fact voice blended well with Copeland's strong percussion & Summer's echoing chords. This is one of the few anti-war anthems I have ever liked. "Omegaman," is a good rocker with Andy Summer's standing out.
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22 of 26 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Lyrics VS Music, March 29, 2007
By 
This review is from: Ghost in Machine (Audio CD)
As a Professional musician and a long time fan of The Police, I'm getting a little sick and tired of all the reviews focusing almost entirely on the lyrics with their symbolism and their socio-political message, etc...

Apart from token lines like: "With airy but moody synths and keyboards...", there's simply no reference at all to Andy Summers' incredibly ingenious and unique guitar playing with all its different colours and textures, his imaginative use of rhythm as well as his unforgettable riffs.

No mention of Stewart Copeland's breath-taking playing. The drumming that influenced a whole generation...

Nor is there any mention of Sting. Yes, he is a master song-writer but what about his instruments? He would have to be one of the most underrated bass players in the history of good music. As a bass player I've always admired his warm sound and his thoughtful playing. He's supportive and mostly sparse without ever being boring and possesses tonnes of tasty-ness. And what can we say about his voice?! Simply an amazing voice. A rich, totally unique tone that's instantly recognizable, combined with beautiful melodic ingenuity. And, when informed by Sting's tremendous musicality, it makes for some of the most heart-felt singing in all of popular music.

It is not my intention to ignore lyrics or their meaning. I love good lyrics as much as anyone else and I am fully aware that for a song to be a 'good song', it has to have both great lyrics and great music working in harmony. All I'm simply saying is that to concentrate exclusively on lyrics (brilliant as they might be) and to ignore the musician's/producer's contributions to the overall creation of a song is to basically relegate music's role to simply background filler. Like a movie soundtrack or a boring one-bar-loop repeated ad-nauseam in a bad Rap song.

The members of The Police deserve much more than that.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The best Police record, but by no means perfect, June 12, 2006
This review is from: Ghost In The Machine [Digipak] (Audio CD)
I give Ghost in the Machine the nod over Zenyatta Mondatta and Synchronicity because of its wonderful unique tone and sound. Sting really takes over on Synchronicity, so this is the last record in which The Police, as a trio, (particularly Stewart Copeland) contribute to the creation of the music.

The synth work on GITM is outstanding. None of it sounds dated, which is atypical of 80's rock music. The synths sound gorgous, warm, dark, and evocative. The first three tracks heavily feature synths, beginning with the angry opening Spirits in the Material World, followed by the joyous/sad Every Little Thing She Does is Magic, and continued into the dark, throbbing Invisible Sun. The first three tracks almost seem self-contained and should be listened to in the order they are presented. They fit together perfectly.

Then the record takes a nosedive. Hungry For You, Demolition Man, and Too Much Information are the weakest tracks and they are bunched together (I suppose better that, than interspersed). The fundamental problem with these tracks is that Sting tries to be funky. Bad choice. Sting is not funky, never has been, never will be. Instead of groovy, he comes off dull, repetitive, and silly.

Even though this is the best Police record, I still tend to skip these tracks. It may seem illogical that I would rate this record so highly, and yet asmit that there is a significant weak spot here to be avoided. But, the fact is that even if you cut out the bad spot, what remains is a wonderful rich selection of music. And even though it isn't a full album's worth, the fact is that neither Zenyatta Mondatta nor Synchronicity devlivered a full album's worth of perfection.

Once you get past Too Much information, the rest is gold. Rehumanize Yourself does have one anoying flaw: the noisy sax solo. I blame Sting for this. In his attempt to infuse horns that remind us of violence he put something into the mix that just doesn't blend, and the overall effect is somewhat grating. One World is one of the best Police jams. Stewart Copeland really shines on drums.

The closing tracks Secret Journey and Darkness are a fantastic finish. I almost think of Secret Journey/Darkness as one song, much like Spirits in the Material World/Every Little Thing She Does is Magic/Invisible Sun blend together at the beginning of the record. One could even take it one step further and notice that Hungry For You/Demolition Man/Too Much Information also blend together (it just happens that they are much weaker than the rest of the record).

I can't help loving the way this record opens and closes. I am more than able to forgive it for falling flat in the middle. Every Little Thing She Does is Magic was a megahit for The Police and I suppose if I had to pick one song from Ghost in the Machine for my mix tape, that would be the one. But, I would rather listen to Spirits/Every/Invisible in order, skip to Rehumanize Yourself, and then close the album with One World/Secret/Darkness. When I hear Secret Journey/Darkness I always get the sensation of entering into a dark tunnel or (I know it sounds silly) the beginning of the Space Mountain ride at Disneyland when your car passes through the tunnel with the laser beams and begins climbing. This music gives me that strong emotional/physical sensation of being pulled into something intriguing, mysterious, and dark. I love it.

One thing I forgot to mention is that The Police are, as usual, a great band and a joy to listen to. The album is unique in their cannon because the synths play such a strong role, they bring a 4th sound to the overall presentation. Unlike Zenyatta Mondatta which was mostly just Vocal, Bass, Guitar, and Drums, Ghost in The Machine is a much fuller sound. I don't necesarily think it is a better sound, but on this particular record, it works fabulously.
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11 of 13 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Their best album; here's why...., September 3, 2007
By 
Peter Leslie (Sydney, Australia) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Ghost In The Machine [Digipak] (Audio CD)
The Police were predominantly a singles band; whilst every album contains at least several well-known singles or album tracks, each also has a certain amount of filler. Here's a test: remove the best 5 tracks from each album and see how the remainder sounds. In my opinion, 'Regatta' and 'Synchronicity' come off poorly with lots of filler, 'Outlandos' is OK, 'Zenyatta' is a creditable second, but the easy winner is 'Ghost'; I believe it has very little music that could be called filler.

A number of reviewers have panned the middle section of 'Ghost', but to my ears it lends the album a cohesive energy and groove lacking on the other albums. Sure, those middle tracks are a bit repetitive, but so is James Brown! It's the sound of the Police trying, with varying success, to add a bit of funk'n'groove and early eighties eurodance to their white reggae and pop/rock. There was a sense of burning ambition in many of the releases of that era and this is no exception. Yes, it can be a dark and sometimes sombre listen, perhaps in places its grasp exceeds its reach, but give me an exciting failure over a dull success any day. Also, of all of the Police's albums, 'Ghost' has matured best with age; twenty-plus years later it still sounds fresh and involving.

For me, a good album should be one that flows from start to finish without my attention wandering, where I feel no inclination to skip tracks, where each song is framed by the others and the whole is greater than the sum of the parts. For me, 'Ghost' is one of those albums, and I never seem to tire of it.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Greatest post-1970's album by anyone - period, May 26, 2000
By 
Jan Patrick Oppermann (London, United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Ghost in Machine (Audio CD)
The only truly great rock band to come into its own after the mid-1970's, the Police got it all together with ZENYATTA MONDATTA. But GHOST IN THE MACHINE is another story altogether. There is no weak song on here, no weak note. The energy is incredible. The menace of Demolition Man and the frustrated hope of Invisible World, carried by Sting's machine gun bass and Copeland's bold drums is simply unequaled. And nowadays, in 2000, after all the "mood music" one could want, a less-than-three-minute tune like Darkness is a revelation. Never since (and possibly never before) have three musicians played together so perfectly. Never since has anyone shown so authoritatively and convincingly that rock music (whatever else it is influenced by) is a revelation and an experience of dark divinity.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fantastic album by a truly great band, April 2, 2006
By 
Tim Burness (Brighton, England) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Ghost In The Machine [Digipak] (Audio CD)
"Ghost In The Machine" ranks alongside "Zenyatta Mondatta" and "Synchronicity" as the three best albums by the phenomenally brilliant band that were The Police. By this one they had moved largely away from their "white reggae" style, towards a more complex produced sound that would peak on the also excellent "Synchronicity".

As usual with Sting, Summers and Copeland, there is a broad range of styles here, both musically and lyrically. "Spirits In The Material World" and others such as "Secret Journey" show Sting's already well-established interest in spiritual matters. Other songs such as the big hit "Every Little Thing She Does Is Magic" are more straightforward love songs. A political theme runs through the album with "Invisible Sun" being about the troubles in Northern Ireland at the time, and "Rehumanize Yourself" making a damning reference to a far right political party.

The musical sophistication, intelligence, high energy and creative imagination of this band was incredible. With this album they expanded their sound to include more keyboards, saxophone and layers of sound in general. Masterful.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Most Underrated Record Of Last 20 Years, November 3, 2000
By A Customer
This review is from: Ghost in Machine (Audio CD)
There is an eternal-spiritual-hypnotic drive to this that is just magical. Every song is either a masterpiece or very good. Head and Shoulders above the Poice's other efforts, it remains a mystery to me why Ghost In The Machine isn't regarded with the very best records of the last two decades, because this can hold it's own with any of them.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The trio's best both musically and technically, February 19, 2001
This review is from: Ghost in Machine (Audio CD)
All of the greatest and most significant rock groups have that one album in their catalog that is their quintessential recording, the one that exemplifies the group's musical genius with a group of tight songs that flow smoothly together. For The Who, it was "Who's Next." For the Grateful Dead, it was "Working Man's Dead." For Midnight Oil, it was "Diesels and Dust." For the Police, it was "Ghost in the Machine."
One thing not mentioned in many of the other reviews was the technical marvel this recording was for the group. Its engineering was far superior to anything previously recorded by the band, and was still better than the group's next and last album, "Synchronicity."
Both musically and lyrically as well, Ghost capture's the band at its creative ascension. From the opening with Spirits in the Material World, through the poppish Everything She Does is Magic, and into the dark and brooding Invisible Sun, this album sets a mood and theme followed through to the last stanza in Darkness. While the political climate of the time (1981, need we say more?) may have influenced Sting, it is probably more likely the reading material Sting was absorbing at the time sparked this dark mood from him. I wish I knew what his reading list was then. But I hear echoes of Hermann Hesse and George Orwell in the chords. And what makes this album even more extra special for me was seeing the Police during the album's tour in Tucson, Ariz. right after they played the Us Festival. Wished I still had the T-shirt!.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars "Ghost In The Senses"...., February 24, 2000
By 
elgin e.suiter (Norfolk, Virginia) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Ghost in Machine (Audio CD)
This is the album that allowed me to become a fan of their music en masse.The first time I heard "Spirits.." was Dec.17,1981.The Rolling Stones were playing that night in Hampton,Va.(Prince opened for them).The show was going to be simulcasted on WNOR FM99.I was laying on the floor of my bedroom,surrounded by darkness,when "Spirits In The Material World" came on.At that moment,I "left" the Stones.This album fit the times with its modern,technology sound.With this album,the group took serious music chances,probably because Sting was embarrassed by the success of Zenyatta Mondatta.The second most haunting track,"Darkness",stays with you viscerally.This is one album that is a true classic.
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Ghost In The Machine [Digipak]
Ghost In The Machine [Digipak] by The Police (Audio CD - 2003)
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