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Ghost In The Machine (Remastered)

Ghost In The Machine (Remastered)

March 4, 2003

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Product Details

  • Original Release Date: March 4, 2003
  • Release Date: March 4, 2003
  • Label: A&M
  • Copyright: (C) 2003 A&M Records Ltd. Under exclusive license to Polydor Ltd.
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 41:03
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B000W297LE
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (129 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,658 Paid in Albums (See Top 100 Paid in Albums)

Customer Reviews

Great Music, Powerful Production and Great Playing = A Classic Album.
Jeff Ball
The same thing happens on the song "Too Much Information." Sting's lyrics and Copeland's music are a perfect match, even though you wouldn't think it.
R. J Schaick
All in all, one of the best famous-band-goes-into-studio-with-horn-section albums ever.
N. P. Stathoulopoulos

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

20 of 20 people found the following review helpful By Paul Binder on November 8, 2006
Format: Audio CD
Ghost in the Machine was the first Police album I owned. After 25yrs, it is still my favorite. The beginning of Secret Journey, with the building intro, would just blow my speakers apart when it kicked in!! Apparently, there was a jump in technology then, because this album seemed much more clearer and louder sounding than Zenyatta. After MTV started, the Every Little Thing She Does Is Magic video was on every hour. Sting, Andy, and Stewart seemed so "happy" in that video. That was part of the reason I got into them. They seemed to be having a great time making music and money. Ironically, years later, I learned that they were practically breaking up then! There were so many elements like group fighting, the dark songs, Sting's divorce, a different producer (Hugh) etc. Maybe the album should have been called "Demolition Band". Strangely, thats what makes Ghost in the Machine so much more unique to me. Despite all that, a great album was born, delivering excellent music to this day.
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30 of 33 people found the following review helpful By SUPPORT THE ASPCA. on January 7, 2007
Format: Audio CD
For me this is a far better album than "Zenyatta Mondatta." I even prefer it over "Synchronicity." Here the band is sour, relaxed, & robust. Some of their previous work seemed a little forced, but with these songs they appear to gel. I'll only focus on four of them. "Spirits In The Material World," is a cutting testament to the shallow material things that many view as essential to their momentary contentment. The reggae feel enlivens the somber mood. "Everything She Does Is Magic," is a spunky love song with a soaring bridge. "Invisible Sun," here Sting is at his sardonic best. His matter of fact voice blended well with Copeland's strong percussion & Summer's echoing chords. This is one of the few anti-war anthems I have ever liked. "Omegaman," is a good rocker with Andy Summer's standing out.
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25 of 29 people found the following review helpful By Rodrigo Aravena on March 29, 2007
Format: Audio CD
As a Professional musician and a long time fan of The Police, I'm getting a little sick and tired of all the reviews focusing almost entirely on the lyrics with their symbolism and their socio-political message, etc...

Apart from token lines like: "With airy but moody synths and keyboards...", there's simply no reference at all to Andy Summers' incredibly ingenious and unique guitar playing with all its different colours and textures, his imaginative use of rhythm as well as his unforgettable riffs.

No mention of Stewart Copeland's breath-taking playing. The drumming that influenced a whole generation...

Nor is there any mention of Sting. Yes, he is a master song-writer but what about his instruments? He would have to be one of the most underrated bass players in the history of good music. As a bass player I've always admired his warm sound and his thoughtful playing. He's supportive and mostly sparse without ever being boring and possesses tonnes of tasty-ness. And what can we say about his voice?! Simply an amazing voice. A rich, totally unique tone that's instantly recognizable, combined with beautiful melodic ingenuity. And, when informed by Sting's tremendous musicality, it makes for some of the most heart-felt singing in all of popular music.

It is not my intention to ignore lyrics or their meaning. I love good lyrics as much as anyone else and I am fully aware that for a song to be a 'good song', it has to have both great lyrics and great music working in harmony. All I'm simply saying is that to concentrate exclusively on lyrics (brilliant as they might be) and to ignore the musician's/producer's contributions to the overall creation of a song is to basically relegate music's role to simply background filler. Like a movie soundtrack or a boring one-bar-loop repeated ad-nauseam in a bad Rap song.

The members of The Police deserve much more than that.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Jacob Kline on June 12, 2006
Format: Audio CD
I give Ghost in the Machine the nod over Zenyatta Mondatta and Synchronicity because of its wonderful unique tone and sound. Sting really takes over on Synchronicity, so this is the last record in which The Police, as a trio, (particularly Stewart Copeland) contribute to the creation of the music.

The synth work on GITM is outstanding. None of it sounds dated, which is atypical of 80's rock music. The synths sound gorgous, warm, dark, and evocative. The first three tracks heavily feature synths, beginning with the angry opening Spirits in the Material World, followed by the joyous/sad Every Little Thing She Does is Magic, and continued into the dark, throbbing Invisible Sun. The first three tracks almost seem self-contained and should be listened to in the order they are presented. They fit together perfectly.

Then the record takes a nosedive. Hungry For You, Demolition Man, and Too Much Information are the weakest tracks and they are bunched together (I suppose better that, than interspersed). The fundamental problem with these tracks is that Sting tries to be funky. Bad choice. Sting is not funky, never has been, never will be. Instead of groovy, he comes off dull, repetitive, and silly.

Even though this is the best Police record, I still tend to skip these tracks. It may seem illogical that I would rate this record so highly, and yet asmit that there is a significant weak spot here to be avoided. But, the fact is that even if you cut out the bad spot, what remains is a wonderful rich selection of music. And even though it isn't a full album's worth, the fact is that neither Zenyatta Mondatta nor Synchronicity devlivered a full album's worth of perfection.

Once you get past Too Much information, the rest is gold.
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