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Ghost Knight Hardcover – May 1, 2012


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Product Details

  • Age Range: 8 - 12 years
  • Grade Level: 3 - 7
  • Lexile Measure: 760L (What's this?)
  • Hardcover: 352 pages
  • Publisher: Little, Brown Books for Young Readers; 1 edition (May 1, 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 9780316056144
  • ISBN-13: 978-0316056144
  • ASIN: 0316056146
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 1.2 x 7.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.4 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (17 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,022,126 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From School Library Journal

Gr 4-6-Jon Whitcroft, an 11-year-old English boy, is not getting along with his mother's boyfriend, a pedantic dentist the boy has nicknamed "The Beard" for his silly facial hair. His mother sends him to the boarding school traditionally attended by his late father. Jon is visited by a murderous ghost and his servants determined to take revenge on the descendants of a man whose murder resulted in his hanging centuries ago. Sending this evil ghost to hell and redeeming the heart of a noble ghost knight form the action of Cornelia Funke's tale (Little, Brown, 2012). Jon learns courage and grace from his ghost-hunting experience and his relationship with Ella Littlejohn, whose grandmother is a witch. Some aspects of the plot don't make much sense, and the preteen characters are not entirely believable because they display the emotional maturity and sexual curiosity of older teenagers. Elliot Hill voices first-person narrator Jon beautifully as he develops from a whiney momma's boy to a courageous ghost hunter and knight's squire. He also does an excellent job with the plucky Ella, her quirky Aunt Zelda, Jon's roommates, and a variety of secondary male and female characters. Thankfully, the lugubrious introductory music is not featured throughout. An entertaining listen, but not up to the caliber of the author's "Ink Heart" trilogy.-Nina Sachs, Walker Memorial Library, Westbrook, MEα(c) Copyright 2011. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted. --This text refers to the Audio CD edition.

Review

"Funke's consummate way with setting, well interpreted in Offermann's looming illustrations, brings the medieval English town (and all of its ghosts) to life, from the sprawling boarding school campus to the echoes-of-the-past cathedral and eerie cemetery grounds; a side jaunt to Stonehenge even adds some levity. Appended notes discuss Funke's inspiration for the story and provide history about the real-life people and places."—Horn Book

"Funke follows her foray into YA (Reckless) with a simultaneously creepy and romantic middle-grade ghost story that will please her legions of younger fans. Despite the book's length, the story moves quickly, filled with daring midnight expeditions and close calls with death."—Publisher's Weekly

"Historic details about the real Hartgill, Longspee and Stourton are deftly woven into a ripping good story. It's told with self-effacing humor from the perspective of an awkward boy who emerges as honorable and brave as the ghost knight and the contemporary girl he befriends. Black-and-white illustrations add to the Tudor atmosphere and drama. Sword-swinging ghosts will haunt readers of this droll, harrowing and historically grounded ghost story."—Kirkus --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

More About the Author

Cornelia Funke is one of today's most beloved writers of magical stories for children. She is the author of The Thief Lord, Dragon Rider, Inkheart, Inkspell, the Ghosthunters series, When Santa Fell to Earth, and Igraine the Brave. She lives with her family in Los Angeles, California, in a house full of books.

Customer Reviews

I would recommend to anyone from the age of 7 to 170.
Miaw
This is a book full of great mysteries, twists, turns and amazing surprises.
KidsReads
I love the setting of the book, the characters, the fantasy of the book.
FireStarBooks

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By KidsReads on June 4, 2012
Format: Hardcover
Jon Whitcroft feels like Harry Potter must have felt when he lived under the stairs with the Dursleys. He has been sent off to a boarding school in Salisbury of all places. Yes, it is true this was his late father's school --- but somehow Jon suspects that the real reason he is there is because his mother has fallen for this dentist guy Jon calls "the Beard." Jon has been the man of the family since he was four years old, but now with The Beard around, nobody seems to care what happens to him. His mother is certainly too distracted to pay attention to him, so what can he do? The fates are against him.
At first, he is not too impressed with Salisbury. Yes, the cathedral is world famous, beautiful and full of history, but so what? Let all those tourists have fun because Jon is "Banished. Homeless. Mother-, dog-, and sisterless." He lives in a building that was known as the Bishop's Palace. There are endless corridors, rooms, doors and staircases, plus lots of strange faces. He has been put in a three-room, meaning he has two roommates: Angus Mulroney and Stuart Crenshaw. So here he is, like it or not. Now what will he do?

The "now what" is soon filled with the most unexpected adventure any boy could ever imagine --- even Harry Potter would find this exciting. Jon is going through his long days being somewhat interested in the colorful histories of the area, meeting his new teacher, Mr. Rifkin, getting better acquainted with the Popplewells who supervise the quarters, and catching insights into his quirky but nice roommates. However, on his sixth night at the school, Jon is awakened by noises outside his window. When he looks, he sees three ghostly figures on horses: "They looked like men who'd had their blood sucked out by the night.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Jennie Geiman on May 9, 2012
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I have to admit that I have been a long time fan of Ms. Funke for many years now. I absolutely loved this book. It is like reading poetry and the imagery that she creates is stunning. I highly recommend this book. While some themes may not be suitable to younger children it is still worth checking out. Jon is such a likable character. Ella is strong and brave. Zelda is hysterical. And William is tragic and kind. Truly remarkable. I hope that there are many more to come with these characters.

Well done!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By raisa on October 21, 2012
Format: Hardcover
Ghost Knight is a hard book to categorize. It's squarely within the boy-goes-to-English-boarding-school, has-supernatural-adventure genre (Funke acknowledges the parallels to Harry Potter). It's got murderous ghosts, demonic possessions, and a nearly scary-for-real amount of gore. It is written at a fifth-grade reading level, with illustrations and naivete that make it definitely more "Juvenile" than "Young Adult." I found Jon (the narrator)'s sarcasm and whining to be more grating than funny. But the setting is great -- the world of Salisbury, England (Cathedral, villages, Stonehenge) is brightly drawn by someone who has obviously been there and loved it.

Overall this is a fun modern-kid ghost story, but a little too mundane to compare to the dark and ethereal The Thief Lord or her nearly-transcedent Inkheart Trilogy.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By wgodbold on July 13, 2012
Format: Hardcover
Ghosts, Knights, swords; moms, sons, step-dads; friends, girls, families; Ghost Knight, by Cornelia Funke, has them all.

Set in Salisbury, England, Funke tells the story of an eleven year old boy named Jon who is sent to boarding school by his mother. As we expect, Jon is unhappy about going to the school. He feels his mother is sending him away so that she can continue to grow her romantic relationship with a dentist known to readers only as, "The Beard." This is the nickname Jon has, quite un-affectionately, given to the man.

After wallowing in his misery at the school, a strange thing happens. Jon is approached by three ghosts. The story begins to unfold revealing that Jon is known to the ghost world by his mother's maiden name of Hartgill. From here, the story takes off and fills with ghosts of all types, adventures that could kill our characters, and maturing relationships on various levels.

While you may enjoy the pure fun of meeting ghosts, dueling knights, and even a little kidnapping, I think you'll mostly enjoy the relationships that Funke develops in this quick read. The story is told from Jon's point of view. From the language used, you sense he is re-telling a story that happened some time ago. It is as if Jon may be in his forties telling you of his first adventure with ghosts when he was eleven. From time to time Jon will say things that indicate the relationships formed at this young age are still important to him as an adult. In fact, one relationship in particular is referenced as though it has deepened considerably over time. This depth building leads me to believe that a sequel or perhaps a trilogy is in the works for these characters; although I have yet to see one announced.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Dorian.EverAfterEsther on May 17, 2012
Format: Hardcover
When I was younger I really liked to read fantasy books set in a medieval era. This book was an interesting blend of fantasy and contemporary that was actually pretty well done.

Reasons to Read:

1.Jon:

Jon is one of those boys that is very misunderstood. He gets into trouble a lot for various reasons, and adults seem to instantaneously hate him. I liked that he was the narrator of the novel because then we got to see into what he was thinking, and why he did the things he does. I liked that he was especially interested in being rebellious for the sake of being rebellious, but it was mostly just big misunderstandings. I also liked how he wasn't perfect. He says and does some things that are not the best. He's also the one being rescued most of the time, although that changes a bit near the end of the book.

2.Sir William Longspee:

Longspee is a ghost that is a knight. That should be enough to explain it right there, but I'll go into a bit more detail. Basically Longspee is this awesome knight that's just epic in every way imaginable. At first, he's painted as this perfect figure that never makes mistakes and always has good morals. You do get to learn a bit more about his past, which made him the most complex character in the entire book. He's also very handy with a sword, and constantly wins his battles throughout the book.

I do wish that a bit more character development could've been established in this book, but the main focus is an older, more mature Jon telling this story. I am glad though that Longspee's character was very well established. This book could definitely appeal to a lot of people, including an older audience, since some of the scenes in this book were a bit frightening and there was some language in it. Overall though, I would reccomend this if you like fantasy and contemporary books, then this is the book for you.

ARC received from HBG Canada.
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