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Comment: Cancelled library hardcover book with protective clear mylar jacket left on (can be removed by buyer if he/she chooses to reveal original dust jacket). Shows minimal reader wear, all the usual library marks, tape and stamps/stickers. Pages intact with no ink markings or highlighting. Strong binding. No pages have been folded or creased.
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Ghost Lights: A Novel Hardcover


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Ghost Lights: A Novel + How the Dead Dream: A Novel + Magnificence: A Novel
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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 256 pages
  • Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company; 1 edition (October 24, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0393081710
  • ISBN-13: 978-0393081718
  • Product Dimensions: 8.3 x 5.8 x 1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12.8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (15 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #876,806 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

“[Lydia Millet] takes aim at the metaphysical jugular...her gorgeous narration...exists in some extraordinary place, at once discursive, editorial, and ruminative…. If literature can under the best circumstances transport, then Millet's extraordinary vision brings us in on the float.” (Minna Proctor - Bookforum)

“In Lydia Millet's brilliant new novel, a skeptical tax man follows a runaway millionaire to Latin America.

Can it be a coincidence that this year — when the issue of taxes has become an abyss that both divides and conquers our national government — we also have two new books about IRS workers by important novelists of ideas? The first, of course, is David Foster Wallace’s posthumously published The Pale King.... The second is Lydia Millet’s new novel, Ghost Lights....

...Millet is seldom compared to J.M Coetzee, who seems an obvious and fruitful influence on...Ghost Lights.... Their prose has a similar, lovely stillness, and both portray characters nudged beyond typical human navel-gazing....” (Laura Miller - Salon.com)

“Millet is a gifted writer, often dropping droll and sardonic throw-away lines of surprisingly smart humor.” (Kirkus Reviews)

“Millet… skillfully interweaves the personal and the political, making Hal’s journey both specific and universal.” (Christine DeZelar-Tiedman - Library Journal)

“Millet is that rare writer of ideas who can turn a ruminative passage into something deeply personal. She can also be wickedly funny, most often at the expense of the unexamined life.” (Tricia Springstubb - Cleveland Plain Dealer)

“...surreal, darkly hilarious and profound… With its linguistic and plot pranks and underlying moral complexity, Ghost Lights recalls the laconic, Lacanian novels of Paul Auster. Like Auster, Millet presents a disoriented postmodern hero who becomes a willing but only marginally competent detective in a mystery that requires a series of absurd divagations leading to a life-changing or life-threatening existential inquiry.” (Carolyn Cooke - San Francisco Chronicle)

“[A] whip-smart, funny novel…. A yarn about marriage, fatherhood, and idealism, its every page idiosyncratically entertaining, amusing, and insightful. Millet proves she might have Jonathan Franzen beat at expertly mixing the political and domestic.” (Martha Steward Whole Living)

“At her best [Millet] exhibits the sweep and Pop-Art lyricism of Don DeLillo, the satiric acerbity of Kurt Vonnegut, the everyday-cum-surrealism harmonics of Haruki Murakami, and the muted-moral outrage of Joy Williams… Strange, alternately quirky, and profound… Millet is operating at a high level in Ghost Lights, and the book provides a fascinating glimpse of what can happen if the self’s rhythms and certainties are shaken. We should be grateful that such an interesting writer has turned her attention to this rich, terrifying subject.” (Josh Emmons - New York Times Book Review)

About the Author

Lydia Millet is the author of literary fiction including Mermaids in Paradise, Magnificence (National Book Critics Circle Award and Los Angeles Times Book Prize finalist), Ghost Lights (New York Times Notable Book), and Love in Infant Monkeys (Pulitzer Prize finalist). She lives outside Tucson, Arizona.

More About the Author

Lydia Millet is a novelist and short-story writer known for her dark humor, idiosyncratic characters and language, and strong interest in the relationship between humans and other animals. Born in Boston, she grew up in Toronto and now lives outside Tucson, Arizona with her two children, where she writes and works in wildlife conservation. Sometimes called a "novelist of ideas," Millet won the PEN-USA award for fiction for her early novel My Happy Life (2002); in 2010, her story collection Love in Infant Monkeys was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize. In 2008, 2011, and 2012 she published three novels in a critically acclaimed series about extinction and personal loss: How the Dead Dream, Ghost Lights, and Magnificence. June 2014 will see the publication of her first book for young-adult readers, Pills and Starships -- an apocalyptic tale of death contracts and climate change set in the ruins of Hawaii.

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
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Highly recommended for a very pleasurable reading experience.
Cary B. Barad
I would have given five stars, but she gets a little too philosophical for me at times, and the ending left me cold.
Daniel Holland
The narrative moves briskly forward, the writing is clear if a little literary, and the atmosphere well rendered.
Jonathan A. Weiss

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By "switterbug" Betsey Van Horn TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on June 27, 2012
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This second book of Millet's trilogy, following the intrepid How the Dead Dream, centers on middle-aged IRS bureaucrat, Hal Lindley, Susan's husband, both who were minor characters in the first book. Susan works for T., the protagonist of book one, the man who is missing in Belize, and presumed dead. You don't have to read the first book to engage with the second, but it adds more background and material on several of the characters (especially T.), and some more dimension and history on the story as a whole.

The only writer I can think of that reminds me of Millet is Paul Auster, with his postmodern, darkly comic and surreal novels of characters earnestly struggling, and yet with an absurd haplessness, too, to comprehend their lives. They suffer from disorienting delusions, so that their self-directed journeys are fevered with mortifications. Millet is somewhat quirkier, even, and without the assembled, careful structure of Auster. She is less antiseptic than Auster, with an undertone of gallows humor.

After Hal comes to the conclusion that Susan is having an affair with her preppy office paralegal, he decides to play the potential hero, offering to travel to Belize to find T. Stern, who has been missing since he went on a boat trip with a guide up the Monkey River. Several issues plague Hal, besides Susan's affair. First, he feels like he is responsible for forcing Susan to suppress her bohemian, free-love spirit that she possessed when they first met in the 60's (it is now 1994, dated by the death of Kurt Cobain).
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By voraciousreader on January 7, 2012
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This is my first book review for Amazon and I am jumping in here only because I so loved this book I wanted to see it get another 5 star rating.Others have delved further into the plot and I suggest that readers forgo the "book review" below as it contains an ending spoiler which I would have hated to have uncovered ahead of time. This story is so beautifully constructed that I am going back now and rereading upon finishing in order to appreciate the interconnected pieces and subtly placed hints that carry one to the amazing ending. This is an intellectual journey of an extremely ordinary person coming to find his extraordinary self. The layers of insight revealed relentlessly as we travel with Hal mirror everything from the horrific state of the world we live in and our means of shutting out the terrible pain of what it means to live, love and lose, to the embracing of one's own mortality and the inevitable dispassionate judgement of no god greater than one's own soul.
Yes the book demands that you slow down and read each sentence more carefully than you might normally do, but what rewards await your diligence! This was a feast and I enjoyed every minute...I laughed out loud on the airplane when I started it, because Hal's insight is wicked funny, and later got up in the middle of the night to finish it...I just had to know where it was going, and I was sorry to have to put it down in the end.
For me it was a relief to come across a read like this, original, revealing, stimulating, challenging, funny...if you like to push up against the boundaries of your comfort zone, and end up feeling like you just went somewhere profound in your armchair then this might be a good one for you.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Richard Badalamente on May 28, 2012
Format: Hardcover
An I.R.S. agent, Hal, goes looking for his wife's missing boss in a Central American jungle. Why? Because he thinks his wife is having an affair with a paralegal who works in the boss's office? Maybe, maybe for more complicated reasons. The boss, "T." disappeared on a trip to Belize. Hal's wife is frantic. Hal, drunk at a party, announces he will go to Belize and find T. Hal's wife and his paraplegic daughter, are amazed and grateful. Hal is stunned by his own decision, but "what the hell?" During his sojourn in the jungles and resorts and jails and bars and house parties of Belize, Hal reflects on his life, his character, his failures as a husband and father, and life in general. He meets a German couple and their two young sons. "Hans and Gretel" befriend him and, incredibly, volunteer to help him find the missing (dead?) T. Hal ruminates on the German character; determined, efficient, productive, and goes skinny dipping with the beautiful wife. They have sex on the beach, while the husband enlists the aid of the American Coast Guard, and Belize military cadets in a search for T. Hal's reflections on the human condition, his own failings, his newly formed aspirations, are sincere, touching, pathetic, and humorous all at once. Maybe this sounds too cerebral, but Lydia Millet weaves this tale so deftly, with such sly humor and such dead-on pathos, with such terrible insights, and suspense, that the book simply won't be put down. One reviewer here criticized the novel for not having a plot. Wrong. The plot is one man's journey to a new comprehension of his being. It is an engrossing journey.
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7 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Cary B. Barad on December 5, 2011
Format: Hardcover
An edgy, side splitting novel of a mild-mannered government bureaucrat who fears that he has been cuckolded by "Robert the Paralegal". Subsequently, he goes through a number of existential crises that lead him to the hotels and jungles of the Carribean, where he is confronted by a pair of "neurotic bohemians" and by a family of "aggressive German tourists" in his search for a venture capitalist gone missing. The scenarios in this book are written tongue-in-cheek, and bring to mind a WASPish Woody Allen/Larry David misadventure. I should add that there is a very dark side as well, but this only adds to the novel's edginess. Highly recommended for a very pleasurable reading experience.
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