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  • Ghost in the Shell: Stand Alone Complex, Volume 01 (Episodes 1-4)
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Ghost in the Shell: Stand Alone Complex, Volume 01 (Episodes 1-4)


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Frequently Bought Together

Ghost in the Shell: Stand Alone Complex, Volume 01 (Episodes 1-4) + Ghost in the Shell: Stand Alone Complex - Vol. 2 (Special Edition) + Ghost in the Shell: Stand Alone Complex, Volume 03 (Special Edition)
Price for all three: $69.98

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Product Details

  • Actors: Dino Andrade, Kevin Brief, Loy Edge, Barbara Goodson, Michael Gregory
  • Writers: Dai Satô, Mary Claypool, Shotaro Suga, Yoshiki Sakurai, Yutaka Omatsu
  • Producers: Charles McCarter, Kaoru Mfaume, Ken Iyadomi
  • Format: Animated, Color, Dolby, NTSC, Subtitled, Widescreen, Surround Sound
  • Language: English, Japanese
  • Subtitles: English
  • Region: Region 1 (U.S. and Canada only. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.78:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Rated: Unrated
  • Studio: Manga Video
  • DVD Release Date: July 27, 2004
  • Run Time: 120 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (53 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B00024I18M
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #389,395 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)
  • Learn more about "Ghost in the Shell: Stand Alone Complex, Volume 01 (Episodes 1-4)" on IMDb

Special Features

None.

Editorial Reviews

Product Description

The broadcast series based on Mamoru Oshii's influential film "Ghost in the Shell" (1995) has been eagerly awaited on both sides of the Pacific. Although its production values are lower, and director Kenji Kamiyama never equals Oshii's inspired camerawork, "Stand Alone Complex" does an impressive job of re-creating the setting and characters. Major Motoko Kusanagi moves through a deadly city of "mecha", cyborgs, humans, and human-prosthetic hybrids. (The series takes place in a parallel world, where Kusanagi never encountered the Puppet Master.) With the help of Batou, Togusa, and other officers from Public Security Section 9, she battles terrorists, hackers, and rogue machinery. An insect-like tank with a grating, babyish voice is a dubious addition to the cast, but fans of both Oshii's film and Shirow Masamune's original manga will find the program delivers plenty of hard-hitting action. (Rated 13 and older: considerable violence, grotesque imagery, nudity, alcohol use) "--Charles Solomon"

Amazon.com

The broadcast series based on Mamoru Oshii's influential film Ghost in the Shell (1995) has been eagerly awaited on both sides of the Pacific. Although its production values are lower, and director Kenji Kamiyama never equals Oshii's inspired camerawork, Stand Alone Complex does an impressive job of re-creating the setting and characters. Major Motoko Kusanagi moves through a deadly city of mecha, cyborgs, humans, and human-prosthetic hybrids. (The series takes place in a parallel world, where Kusanagi never encountered the Puppet Master.) With the help of Batou, Togusa, and other officers from Public Security Section 9, she battles terrorists, hackers, and rogue machinery. An insect-like tank with a grating, babyish voice is a dubious addition to the cast, but fans of both Oshii's film and Shirow Masamune's original manga will find the program delivers plenty of hard-hitting action. (Rated 13 and older: considerable violence, grotesque imagery, nudity, alcohol use) --Charles Solomon

Customer Reviews

I know I will get some hate for saying this, but it must be said.
Timstuff
I've seen the entire series, and it is by far one of the best anime series I've seen.
D. Wue
They should be lauded for some really good writing and excellent computer animation.
D. Odenwald

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

36 of 36 people found the following review helpful By Marc Ruby™ HALL OF FAMEVINE VOICE on December 20, 2004
Format: DVD
Ghost in the Shell was one of my first exposures to Japanese feature length anime. It was at its time a superb technical and artistic achievement, and still is today, despite the number o anime series that have borrowed from it. Now a new venture brings the same contest to the more intimate television experience. And once again the durability of the plot and ideas are demonstrated to a new audience.

The context is a time not far in our future when heavy cybernetic modifications of the human body are possible. For some this has gone to the point of using a totally artificial both with an implanted human brain (the ghost) and it's associated quirks and personality. The star of this series is one such, Major Moto Kusanagi, both beautiful and deadly. She is a lead investigator in Section 9, a special police branch headed by Chief Aramaki. Her and her team are often brought in when a case involves national security and the intermixing of cybernetic and human consciousness. For the fans of the original film and the manga, the whole crew is present - Batou, Togusa, and the ever-present Tachikoma robots.

The continuity between this series and its origins is excellent - although Kusanagi has a habit of being even less dressed than she appears in the film. The world of the series has been updated a bit to cover for the change in public awareness of digital possibilities. The premise for this is that the events leading up to Kusanagi's transformation into a creature of the net simply didn't happen. Director and writer Kenji Kimiyama has set out to create a slightly more down to earth story with more components of a police procedural than deep philosophical moments. Although the issues of what is human and what is not still continue to haunt the stories it not longer dominates.
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28 of 29 people found the following review helpful By Alan V. Dunkin on June 18, 2004
Format: DVD
The Ghost in the Shell name is best known for the animated movie released in Japan and the United States in the mid 1990s, based on the popular manga by Masamune Shirow. In 2002 Production I.G. started ambitious work on an evolutionary animated series heavily based on the manga, with more input from Shirow. In June 2004, the series will make its American debut on the Cartoon Network, followed by this DVD release in July.
Stand Alone Complex then is the title for the TV series, which takes place independently from the manga and theatrical movies. Crafted wonderfully, the series features a balance of intelligence, technology, rebellious counter-culture, sadness, action, and cerebral plots that, while typical of Japanese manga, go far and above what American viewers typically receive. Movie watchers will see some familiar characters and settings - the main character, Major Motoko Kusanagi, is the tactical commander of Public Peace Section 9, a described governmental "offensive force against crime" led by the older Daisuke Aramaki.
Section 9's members are nearly all cyborgs - military-grade constructed bodies and cyberbrains that host the human brain imprint (essentially the soul or "ghost" of a person, the "shell" being the body). Batou, the muscular gung-ho cyborg, and Togusa, the semi-normal relative newcomer (he's essentially a human with some cybernetic implants) should also be familiar to movie viewers, as is Ishikawa. Other more one-dimensional team members, like Saito, Pazu, and Boma, will probably be more familiar for manga readers. The Tachikomas (Fuchikomas in the manga) round out the active Section 9 staff, sentient AI tanks that provide a bit of humor with their child-like, yet compelling, mannerisms, personalities and voices.
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16 of 17 people found the following review helpful By D. Wue on September 29, 2004
Format: DVD
The issues concerning the internet these days may well be considered as precursors to GITS:SAC. Privacy, access, surveillance, information, internet morality, and humanity are all problems dealt with in "Ghost in the Shell: Stand Alone Complex", except that the implications and legal ramifications are well established and things of the past. You will be compelled to outgrow the technological adolescence of the present very quickly to deal with the maturity and depth of the world of GITS.

I've seen the entire series, and it is by far one of the best anime series I've seen. The original movie was quite revolutionary by itself, but I have to say that the creators, producers, and studio have outdone themselves by a long shot with this series. The original characters are all there, Major Kusanagi, Batou, Togusa, etc., with the addition of several others who provide support and round out Section 9, a futuristic FBI/CIA organization, as a unit. The series is very much like NYPD Blue, in that you get to know the characters and their cases quite well.

What's astonishing about the series is that the creators have provided an amazingly detailed premise: the world has gone COMPLETELY digital, and the world's population is now linked to the future version of the internet with implants to the point where the line between personality/self and this alternate space has blurred considerably. They then ask the mind-boggling question: what could possibly happen in this kind of world? They answer, of course, with half-hour case studies of cyber-crime, political intrigue, digital culture, and philosophical soul-searching.

Each episode is self-consistent and follows very stringently the physics upon which the series is based.
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