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The Giants Novels (Inherit the Stars, The Gentle Giants of Ganymede, and Giants' Star) Mass Market Paperback – May 1, 1994


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Product Details

  • Mass Market Paperback: 704 pages
  • Publisher: Del Rey (May 1, 1994)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0345388852
  • ISBN-13: 978-0345388858
  • Product Dimensions: 6.9 x 4.3 x 1.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 11.2 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (52 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #804,774 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From the Inside Flap

Discover the first three books in the ground-breaking 21st century hard-science fiction saga by James P. Hogan:
INHERIT THE STARS
The skeletal remains of a human body are found on the moon. His corpse is 50,000 years old, and nobody knows who he was, how he got there, or what killed him.
THE GENTLE GIANTS OF GANYMEDE
A long-ago wrecked ship of alien giants is discovered by Earth's scientists on a frozen satellite of Jupiter. Then, spinning out of the vastness of space, a ship of the same strange, humanoid giants has returned....
GIANTS' STAR
Humans finally thought they comprehended their place in the universe...until Earth found itself in the middle of a power struggle between a benevolent alien empire and a cunning race of upstart humans who hated Earth!

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Customer Reviews

It is a fun adventure written in the best traditions of science fiction.
Richard La Fianza
I really enjoy Hogan's ability to take a scientific theory and weave it into a story.
Gregory J. Hogan
I read INHERIT THE STARS some years ago - having picked it up at a used book store.
sky33179@AOL.com

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

12 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Richard La Fianza on November 30, 2000
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Inherit the Stars starts on the moon sometime in the near future when astronauts find a dead body human body 1000's of years old. How did it get there? How could it be there? No one knows.
The writer then procedes, step by step, to explain how this could have happened. His science is so strong that, if I read this a few years in the future, I might believe it was actually happening. While the end of the book takes a few leaps of faith, (pun is intended), it all seems amazing real. It is a fun adventure written in the best traditions of science fiction.
The second book here, there are three in one combined in this book, is also great. It is a story about our first contact with creatures from another planet. Because these creatures had such a different evolutionary path from us, they are as much different, intellectually, as in their appearance.
The big difference in this story, as opposed to most science fiction, is how nice these aliens are. Earth falls in love with them and you will too. The writing, extremely optimistic about human nature, was a nice change of pace from most books of the genre. Since the violence here is at a minimum, the author uses a few interesting mysteries, unresolved from the first book, to maintain the series pace and tension.
The final installment in this series was fun too, but it took a different tact. The optimism expressed so nicely in the first two books is lost here. This world has government conspiracies and aggressive alien races. Violence, or its threat, is finally found in the series.
The science, as well, is a little closer to fantasy then science fiction. The first book "could" happen, at least it seems that way. The second story is a fantasy, but its discussions about evolution was great. The last book would be good anywhere, it jsut didn't fit in very well with the series. All are good though. All of them are worth reading.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on August 22, 1997
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Ever since I read this incredible book, no other
sci-fi novel ever came close to satisfying me. I cannot praise this book enough. All other so called sci fi books seem devoid of content and meaning compared to this one. I'm glad amazon has the other two books of the trilogy, because I've spent the last five years looking for them
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Arthur W. Jordin on January 22, 2004
Format: Mass Market Paperback
The Giants Novels is an omnibus edition of the Giants series. This volume contains Inherit the Stars, The Gentle Giants of Ganymede, and Giants' Star. These novels were the first published by the author.

Millennia before the Apollo project, mankind had reached Luna. As man returns to the Moon, he finds evidence of a prior human technological society. Moreover, he finds artifacts of another alien civilization on Ganymede, the largest moon of Jupiter.

In Inherit the Stars, a survey party finds someone in a spacesuit within a cave-like hole in the Copernicus crater. The body was that of a human being who had died over 50,000 years ago. Apparently it had come from Minerva, the long destroyed planet between Mars and Jupiter.

In The Gentle Giants of Ganymede, an alien spaceship has been found under the ice of Ganymede. Inside are found the remains of eight-foot tall entities who have been named Ganymedeans. Then the Shapieron, a fully operational Ganymedean spaceship, appears near Ganymede.

In Giants' Star, the Shapieron leaves to search for the migrated Ganymedeans at a star in the constellation of Taurus. Before their departure, a message is sent from a human installation on the Luna Farside toward this star telling of the ship's departure and a response is received soon thereafter welcoming the crew to their new home. Although no other responses are received for some time, months later messages start arriving in English using standard communication codes from a source in the fringe of the solar system.

These novels established the author's reputation as a writer of hard science fiction capable of inducing a sense of wonder.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Elderbear VINE VOICE on July 18, 2001
Format: Mass Market Paperback
The Giant's Trilogy speculates about an alternative path for human evolution, the source of human aggressiveness, and the irrationality of evil. My copy call it "A novel about man's place in the Universe." This trilogy weaves a multi-dimensional tapestry to point out the absurdities and dangers of a warrior/dominator culture.
The story introduces itself with the discovery of "Charlie," a 50,000 year-old human corpse on the moon. How did he get there when Neanderthals still walked the Earth? The first book answers this question, but opens up to deeper mystery. In the process it introduces the reader to one of the processes in the scientific community.
New scientific theories begin when attempts to explain a discovery challenge the assumptions of the current paradigm. Complicated theories develop more and more unsupportable mechanisms until somebody has the courage to challenge a fundamental tenet of the old paradigm: "the earth is not the center of the universe" or "the continents drift." Hogan makes this process seem relatively quick and painless. In the real world, it may take decades--once people were even burned at the stake for this kind of breakthrough.
The Gentle Giants of Ganymede, the second book in the trilogy, avoids the abyss many authors fall into between the hook of the first book and the climax of the third. An interesting book in its own right, it tells a story about humankind's first extraterrestrial contact. It explains more pieces of the mystery of "Charlie," but it also raises more questions--questions the aliens cannot answer.
Philosophically, this book allows Hogan to describe a non-violent, non-coercive society, and how it might have evolved naturally.
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