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Gigamic - Skybridge

by Gigamic

Currently unavailable.
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  • Skybridge is suitable for 2 to 4 players
  • ages 7 and up
  • playing time 20 to 30 minutes.
Currently unavailable. We don't know when or if this item will be back in stock.

Product Description

The Sky is the limit in this 3-D architecture strategy project Use your 2 and 3 story building blocks to build towers, use the bridges to connect adjacent towers, and the roofs to determine the tower's owner. The one who crowns the most structures wins the games.

Product Details

  • Product Dimensions: 11.1 x 2.4 x 11.1 inches ; 4.4 pounds
  • Shipping Weight: 5.2 pounds
  • ASIN: B000GD7Z7W
  • Item model number: SKY
  • Manufacturer recommended age: 8 years and up
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #648,979 in Toys & Games (See Top 100 in Toys & Games)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Product Warranty: For warranty information about this product, please click here

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Customer Reviews

3.2 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By PLAYLIFE on April 14, 2011
I'd have to disagree about the complexity of the rules and calculations involved. I read the rules in 2-3 minutes and they are pretty short and straightforward. I do not know what "calculations" people are speaking about. If you own a tower then you count the number of floors. Let's say "7" floors. Then another building, lets say "6" floors. This building is also connected by your bridge to another tower that has five floors. So your total score is 7+6+5=18. In a game of strategy this is a really basic math. I'd say in any context this is really basic math. I can't say it is a complicated game. Though, to be really good at it you have to play a number of games and learn by experience and try to figure out one or two strategies.
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There's something very pleasing about these heavy wooden blocks and the pastel towers they create. As the game progresses, the rising structure looks like an Art Deco city of the future, a sort of weird retropolis with gable roofs and of course the skybridges.

But how does it play? In a word: awkwardly. At the outset, each player has a set of blocks to play, some big, some small, as well as a couple of bridges and a couple of "caps". When you cap a tower, you get the score for it at the end. If you build a bridge, you get the score for wherever the bridge goes to as well as the tower you capped - however, you must cap one of the towers you bridged, otherwise it was a wasted bridge. There are two crucial rules. One is that two blocks of the same colour cannot touch. This means you cannot cap your own blocks; you depend on someone else playing the last piece on a tower and then you cap that. In particular, you can't carry on building on a bridge once you've played it; you depend on someone else putting their block on top of your bridge, then you put your cap on their block. Why would another player help you out this way?

The answer is, because you MUST place blocks on the LOWEST available space. You only have a free choice if there are several available lowest places (like at the start of the game) or you intend to play a cap.

What this means is, at the start of the game you have tons of option, so many in fact that there seems no tactical way of choosing between them. Later in the game, your options disappear and you are forced to play your blocks in places determined by the height of the towers.

There's only one important decision to make in the game and that's when to play your two bridges.
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0 of 5 people found the following review helpful By J. Milligan on June 9, 2010
I agree with the above post. The blocks are beautiful, but my husband and I have read through the instructions several times, we tried just winging it to see if we could figure it out as we go, but still we're pretty clueless. Hence, this online search for easier to understand directions which brought me here! It sounds like it will be a good game if we can ever figure out how to play it!
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2 of 9 people found the following review helpful By S. Lowery on September 3, 2007
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This toy is exquisitely crafted. But I thought the directions were difficult. Written in tiny print, with a lot of math calculations that weren't mentioned in the description of the item, I just wanted to return it. My ten and twelve year grandkids that I bought it for ended up stacking the blocks for fun, once. But that was all they were interested in doing. Rewrite the directions and make it more kid friendly. I looked it over twice trying to figure it out and could not. If I can't grasp a game really fast, don't have time to try and figure it out. I definitely think the math aspect should have been included in the directions.
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