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Gilbert: The Man Who Was G. K. Chesterton Paperback – August 1, 2001


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Gilbert: The Man Who Was G. K. Chesterton + Heresy: Ten Lies They Spread About Christianity + Why Catholics Are Right
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 336 pages
  • Publisher: Regent College Publishing (August 1, 2001)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1573831956
  • ISBN-13: 978-1573831956
  • Product Dimensions: 8.8 x 6 x 0.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,732,180 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Gilbert Keith Chesterton (1874-1936), although perhaps best known nowadays for his Father Brown mysteries, which have been adapted for TV, was a prolific poet, novelist and essayist. He deserves another biography, but this affectionate work by a Toronto literary critic is merely adequate. Catholic writers in particular have lauded Chesterton's wit, style and industriousness, while others have castigated his logorrhea, sloppy research, unintending insensitivity and anti-Semitism. Coren tries to deal fairly with the corpulent, sword-stick-carrying author--whom he insists on calling Gilbert--but he fails to convince us of Chesterton's charm or importance. Photos not seen by PW.
Copyright 1990 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Library Journal

Chesterton (1874-1936) crammed his life with work, drawing, editing, debating, and writing mysteries, biographies, histories, essays, and poetry, over 70 volumes in all. He knew many contemporary literary figures such as Shaw, Belloc, and Beerbohm. In a balanced and chronological way, Coren follows this huge, peculiar man, quoting extensively from letters, journals, and his autobiography. In readable prose he chronicles Chesterton's sometimes naive economic and political ideas, occasional bigotry, efforts to maintain his bloated body, and influential conversion to Catholicism. With his "frequent insistence on treading the middle road, even when that position was untenable," Chesterton is a slippery, sometimes annoying, figure. The book is a life, not a literary criticism, and is recommended for large libraries that want another view of this writer.
- John Miller, Normandale Community Coll., Bloom ington, Minn.
Copyright 1990 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

16 of 17 people found the following review helpful By "boniface" on March 4, 2000
Format: Hardcover
With a growing interest in the life and literary works of the English writer G.K. Chesterton, I was in the market for a modern, one-volume biography of the man. A friend suggested this book, and I am SO glad he did! As literary biographies go, this one is excellent. Coren not only covers the great Chesterton's life with sympathy and humour, but also manages a solid critique and evaluation of the writer's output...and Chesterton's output was very substantial (rather like the man himself)! What is a real joy though, is to read a biography of a fine writer, written by another fine writer. And Michael Coren is all of that. This well-educated, erudite, and witty man is a wonderful author in his own right, and I look forward to further works by him. I suspect that a century from now, people may be reading a biography of Michael Coren, just as we can now read Coren on Chesterton. We can only hope that such a future author creates as pleasant and stimulating a work as the Canadian Michael Coren has here! I'll go so far as to say that this biography is a worthwhile read, even if you don't care about Chesterton. Biography doesn't get any better than this! -A wonderful book.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Anyone who has read G.K. Chesterton will know that his work is very inspirational and often times complicated as he is an in-depth theologian. Coran does an excellent job in bringing the genious to the common man such as my self....
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2 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Wyman Richardson on February 18, 2013
Format: Paperback
My first encounter with G.K. Chesterton created quite a problem for me. I first read him in the midst of what I can only call a myopic fascination with and nearly obsessive reading of the works of C.S. Lewis in high school and college. In fact, my initial reading of Chesterton was due to Lewis' own frequent reference to him and, in that sense, was a kind of corollary extension of the Lewis mania of which I was a willing and joyful victim. So it was that I picked up Chesterton's Orthodoxy, though Lewis himself seemed more fond of his The Everlasting Man.

The problem I encountered when reading Orthodoxy was that it deeply challenged my own relatively recent (at the time) conviction of the seminal supremacy of Lewis' Mere Christianity. Clearly, I am using "problem" here with no small measure of tongue-in-cheek, but I do remember experiencing an acute kind of spiritual sensory overload upon reading Chesterton for the first time. I found myself thinking thoughts that were utterly unthinkable to me at that time. Scandalous thoughts like, "I think Orthodoxy may actually be more poignant than Mere Christianity." Or, "I think, if I am honest with myself, that I frankly enjoy reading Chesterton more than Lewis."

I suspect the significance of this (and, of course, it is only significant to my own journey, but it is insignificant in every other conceivable way) can only be understood if I stress how blatantly life-changing, worldview-changing, spiritually-challenging, and path-altering Mere Christianity and the Lewis canon were and are to me. I know that my experience with Lewis and his work was no greater than the myriad similar testimonies of those whose paths and thinking were altered by Lewis' writings, but I daresay that it wasn't less.
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