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74 of 78 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Ginger Snaps
Ginger Snaps. What can I say about this movie? I saw it when I was seventeen years old on HBO and instantly fell in love with it before the opening credits were through. Gore and cheesy effects aside, I have to say this movie is brilliant. It was a pretty original spin on the werewolf theme. If you like animals, especially dogs, you might have a hard time watching this at...
Published on March 15, 2006 by Delphine Debeaumont

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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Ginger the Werewolf
Ginger Snaps was a pleasant surprise. I actually saw Ginger Snaps Back: The Beginning before I saw this one. I enjoyed Ginger Snaps Back so much that I was enticed to watch this one. Now all I need to see is Ginger Snaps 2. If it is anything like the other two, then I'll be satisfied. These movies did not get a lot of hype. Not that I know of anyway. But they...
Published on January 20, 2006 by Larry Shepherd


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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars An overlooked gem!!, February 2, 2002
By A Customer
This review is from: Ginger Snaps (DVD)
I rented Ginger Snaps based on a review I read in Entertainment Weekly during the film's limited theatrical release last fall. I wasn't expecting much even though that review was fairly positive. When the movie was over I just sat there in stunned silence. A truly excellent horror film!! For starters, if you don't get creeped out by the opening title sequence, you must already be dead. Secondly, this movie has so many wonderful layers that I can't even cover them all in this space. It's a horror movie, a black comedy, a coming of age story, a family drama, a social satire and on and on and on and it covers all of these bases beautifully. And on top of all that it is SCARY SCARY SCARY!!!! It was so refreshing to see, once the monster rears it's head, an actual animatronic creation rather than some glossy, phony digital creation. Just rent this movie. You don't even have to be a horror fan. Just shut up and rent it!!!!
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12 of 14 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars THIS ONE HAS SOME BITE TO IT, October 25, 2005
By 
Thomas D. Christianson (Ashland, WI United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Ginger Snaps (DVD)
A new age, teen werewolf movie with a big bite. Two sisters obsessed with death get a taste of it up close and personal. Truly terrifying with some dark humor sprinkled here and there. Unknowns, Emily Perkins and Katharine Isabelle, would seem to have a bright future in the making. Lots of gore, frights, and raging hormones. Everything you would want in a good horror story. This one gets you by the throat and does not let go. Highly recommended for fright fans.

Thanks, and sleep well,

Tom
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14 of 17 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Could this be the first feminist horror?, June 1, 2001
By 
Gauntgirl (Vancouver, BC Canada) - See all my reviews
....
As I'm sure many horror fans can relate, I've reached a point where an over exposure to disappointingly bad horror has left me cynical and skeptical. For this very reason, I nearly completely overlooked Ginger Snaps. In a sea of low budget horror crap, Ginger Snaps is a true gem that risks being swallowed up by waves of trendy teen exploitation slashers. Ginger brings a breath of fresh air to the teen horror genre with its biting wit, intelligent script, and downright scary atmosphere.
Sixteen-year-old Ginger (played by Katherine Isabelle) and fifteen year old Brigitte (Emily Perkins) are sisters with a disturbing, if not enviable, bond. Their sibling connection runs deep and they share an understanding that is totally unique from the world they live in. Although their existence is a dark one, they live in a world that is truly of their own creation. And the only thing that stands to destroy their bond is the monstrous (literally) effect that puberty has on Ginger.
Ginger and Brigitte are both late bloomers, and when Ginger finally gets her first period, events are set into motion that will ultimately tear the sisters apart. As the girls are hunting up trouble late one night, the scent of Ginger’s first blood attracts a vicious werebeast, and the attack that ensues is more than subtly suggestive of the violent changes that take place in the bodies of all pubescent girls.
Far from being just another teen slasher, Ginger Snaps is a movie about familial bonds, social exclusion, and the very real horrors of adolescence. The film’s examination of menstruation and female sexuality are brave, to say the least, and honest. The metaphorical “curse” that is menstruation is intelligently explored through the development of Ginger’s more bestial characteristics. This film is one of the only horror films that I would hazard to call “feminist horror” (which both excites me and saddens me because I was hoping that one day I would invent the feminist horror genre). And even though the scriptwriter is a woman (Karen Walton to be precise), I am constantly blown away that Ginger was directed by a man, John Fawcett. I say this because there are many subtleties of the female adolescent condition that are apparent throughout this film (but, this is probably a subject best left for one of my future analytical film critiques).
I hope that this talk of menstruation and feminism doesn’t turn off our male readers. Ginger Snaps is also masterfully hysterical. I dragged the boyfriend to see Ginger with me the first time and we were both rolling in the isles. I wouldn’t call Ginger a comedy, per se, but the dialogue is more often than not darkly comical and bitingly sarcastic, not to mention witty and intelligent. Also worth noting are the special effects. Ginger’s budget was measly by Hollywood standards so don’t expect to see any amazing CG monsters. Instead, you can expect to see a return to the good old days of animatronics, silicone, and light tricks. Personally, I’m glad to see it. The film feels altogether more organic thanks to the sf/x choices. It is interseting to note that the design for the werebeast cannot be adequately described in terms of the werewolves that most of us are used to. The feel is much more feline, more feminine than your typical werewolf - furthering the film's theme of the animalistic female.
In my opinion, Ginger Snaps is a revolutionary film in the werewolf genre. I've read articles that compared this film to A Company of Wolves (and if that helps to convince you to see it, then great) but I would be reluctant to compare this film to any other. It truely stands in a class of its own.
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Suprise...it's good, November 5, 2005
This review is from: Ginger Snaps (DVD)
Not your typical modern horror film. The producers and writers actually spent time trying to tell a story rather than to dazzle us with cgi werewolf transformations. The two female leads are quite compelling and you'll definitely stay with it till the end. This first entry is the best in the series which slowly deteriorates during Part 2 and Part 3. You should definitely see Part 1 and then move at your own risk to the sequels. However, you might be pleasantly surprised if you don't get your hopes up too high.
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11 of 13 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A new take on the werewolf film genre and it succeeds, August 2, 2004
By 
A. Sandoc "sussarakhen" (San Pablo, California United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Ginger Snaps (DVD)
Just got a copy and watched a very underrated and excellent horror film from Canada. Ginger Snaps is one of the best werewolf films since the early 80's An American Werewolf In London, The Howling and Wolfen. The other werewolf film that can even rise up and stand up to Ginger Snaps is Neil Marshall's Dog Soldiers.

This film takes the standard werewolf story and gives it a tone that is very close to some of David Cronenberg's films. The story deals with a couple of teenage sisters whose preoccupation with goth and death adds to the film's subtext of teenage angst and alienation within the confines of the high school environment. The sisters are played wonderfully by Katherine Isabelle and Emily Perkins. Isabelle plays the title role of Ginger while Perkins that of the younger sibling Brigitte.

The werewolf angle is used as a metaphor for puberty, especially the body changes a girl goes through towards becoming a woman. It is this use of a standard horror convention to explain the idea and concept of sex which makes this film very Cronenberg. Ginger Snaps is not all subtext and metaphors. This film has scares and blood aplenty. The make-up FX used for the werewolf is believable and there's not a CGI to be seen to give the effects that artificial look to them. These effects --- like those in Dog Soldiers --- owes much to those films listed above.

It seems that the upsurge in horror films these past 5 years have come from low to mid-budgeted efforts. It just goes to show that throwing loads and loads of cash to make a horror film doesn't mean it'll turn up good. Ginger Snaps shows that traditional horror filmmaking is not dead, but still alive and making a serious comeback.

I highly recommend.
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11 of 13 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars An antidote to the current teen-horror malaise., September 25, 2001
This review is from: Ginger Snaps (DVD)
What is it about Canada that produces genuinely unsettling, disturbing, non-cop-out horror films, from 'Black Christmas' to Cronenberg to this? In a clotted market of tired spoofs and increasingly desperate sensation-mongering, 'Ginger Snaps' is the real, slow-burning, mind-worrying, nerve-fraying thing. In its story of a teenage girl attacked in a nocturnal wood by a werewolf-type creature who begins developing animal characteristics and destructive tendencies, the mark of Cronenberg is evident: not just in the squelchy creature effects, but also in the interest in the various stages of metamorphosis, in the way the characters and the environment around her deals with the move from human to animal, and the way the modest house turns into a cavernous horror chamber in the protracted climax, blurring the lines between disgust and affect.
But this transformation is more familiar and mundane than an accidental meeting with a lycanthrope. Ginger is a moody 16 year old who is finally beginning 'the curse' - she changes from a childish dependence on her younger sister to the more adult world of sexual exploration and female body changes. Here the horror world belongs to Angela Carter and a film like 'The Company of Wolves', where body horror and the wrenching change from child to adult meet. But 'Ginger Snaps' is not merely a metaphor for menstruation - Ginger begins developing male characteristics, such as body hair and a tail, and this hermaphroditic trauma is part of the film's originality.
'Snaps' may be ultimately conservative, locating destructive change in a world of indifferent or silly parents, creativity-crushing teachers, drug-taking or (unprotected) promiscuity. But this is a movie utterly faithful to the world-view of its outsider, brooding teen heroines. Although there is humour, it is not the smarmy character-audience complicity of most teen horror movies, but a mark of the privacy that keeps the viewer to an extent outside. From the opening sequence of a child playing with the bleeding lumps of a mutilated mutt, to the mock-up suicide friezes created by the sisters for art class, to the sickly, unfathomable mise-en-scene, making unexceptional suburbia seem like the most grisly place on earth, to the character of Beatrice, long, dark-robed Goth mistress, with forbidding fringe and intimidating lurch, who Never Smiles Once, 'Snaps' is a celebration of the weird, slightly creepy kids. Like us.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Nearly..., December 3, 2001
By 
J. Howell (United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Ginger Snaps [VHS] (VHS Tape)
This was so nearly one of the best horror films ever... As a rule, most horror movies, let alone werewolf movies, tend to be unimaginative rehashes of the same old cliches. This, most definitely, is something different. But it's not perfect, not quite.
I rented the video after reading several glowing reviews; for the main part i agree with them. I also had the feeling it would appeal to the slightly twisted sense of humour i share with the friend i watched it with. And it did. We were cackling so loudly at some points we got told to shut up by the neighbours; what i love about the film is its comedy. Most of the time it goes way beyond black humour to something else entirely. Fortunately, it's also hysterically funny, at the expense of the bitchy, popular victims of Ginger's transformation. "Shallow grave?" "Seems appropriate." is the one liner i can't get out of my head, but there are many other moments in the first half of the film that made us giggle. The faked death scenes have to be seen to be believed - best title sequence in the world ever. The second half is different, though, as a sense of inevitability descends, and the gloom pervades more than anything.
I was hugely impressed with the characters, and the relationships between them; the fact that Bridget is the heroine at the heart of the film rather than the frighteningly assured
Ginger makes for a far more interesting experience. The way she moves from being the younger sister reluctant to act on her own, to the smart cookie who calmly deals with each new crisis in a surrealy adult way was incredible to watch. The girl literally never smiles, but she conveys the weight of the world while Ginger gets to go off and have all the fun... Total kudos to the actresses and writers for putting such a different spin on things...
Other points include an interesting spin on werewolf mythology: the virus concept that's been used for vampirism before, and the use of monkshood/ wolfsbane to cure it. Loved the scenes when they prepare it like they're about to shoot up. So deliciously ironic. Ginger's confusion about what her condition actually means is memorable: the way she starts dressing, and the moments when she sashays down the school corridor like a panther on the prowl to wolf whistles. And the classic line: "I had an ache, and I thought it was for sex, but its actually to tear everything to *(...) pieces." So true. The way her hair changes is also cool...
And Mimi Rodger's performance as their mother is sublime. A truly inspired character for most of the movie, the moment when she changes all the rules near the end is totally unexpected. Did not see that coming. My only quibble is that it's not given any sense of follow-up or closure. More of that later...
Ok, was not impressed with the animatronics. It fared slightly better than Buffy's laughable efforts with werewolves, but this is just another case of film makers not realising that more is less. We did not need to see as much as we did of the final beast, and it didn't add anything to the story. It only had emotional impact while it bore some resemblance to Ginger.
My main reason for only giving this four stars is the ending. I notice with some trepidation that no-one else has mentioned this in reviews, so maybe it was just me. It was one of the worst endings to such a good film that i have ever seen. Infact, the whole of the last act goes downhill in an attempt to make an action sequence in the basement that was previously not nearly so scary... The reason it annoyed me so much at first was that Bridget spent so much of the film being a quirky, smart character. Then she descends into the basement, and acts pretty much like any other silly horror heroine. Why did Sam think he had a chance in hell of injecting Ginger?? Why does Bridget just wander around with the syringe and never use it, either on herself or Ginger... Even if Ginger has to die, a better ending would have had Bridget picking herself up, using the cure and getting on with life instead of still being trapped in the same tableaux of death with Ginger that the movie began with. There's no doubt that the character progresses, but she seems to revert in the end; and it's just not satisfying. There are so many directions this could have taken, with its themes of the sisters preferring death to adulthood. Bridget grows up mentally and emotionally; Ginger grows up physically, but nowhere near as mature as her little sister. I was literally screaming at the screen as the credits rolled; if the point was to leave every thread left untied, they succeeded. Every tantalising hint that had been dropped before was just left hanging; including where the girls' parents were. That was a whole other story in itself that needed answers. (...) the creature didn't feel like Ginger anymore at the end; and this lost the impact of Bridget killing her... Maybe it was just me, but it all felt unfinished, and not just so a sequel could be tacked on later... In many ways, this ruined what had been a truly original, highly entertaining film. I recommend it; but I would also recommend another ending entirely...
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars the sixth best werewolf film....ever, October 28, 2001
This review is from: Ginger Snaps (DVD)
"The Wolf Man," "An American Werewolf In London," "Werewolf of London," "The Howling," "Curse of the Werewolf," and..."Ginger Snaps." That is how I would rate this great werewolf film based on the past cinematic lycanthropes! This film is not just a werewolf film, however, it is a wonderfully frank and intelligent horror/ teen film although categorizing it a "teen" film does it a diservice. Film captures the werewolf pathos that only a few select films have mangaged to to sort of capture Lon Chaney Jr's original "man." The believable characters give credit to the horror genre in the vein of Stephen King's and Siodmak's best work. There is real power in the sister relationship and credit is due to the two fine actresses, Emily Perkins and Katharine Isabelle. The special effects are awesome not cgi-crap but old-school animatronics that look refreshingly new and unique. This is a fun, thoughtful film that is great for Halloween or anytime of year. You're not a true horror OR film fan if you don't give this disc a whirl. Only and I do mean ONLY gripe is with the DVD itself: Rent this one until they relase the Canadian special edition disc, but do RENT it or they may never feel that it will sell well enough here to warrant the SE disc!
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Horror fans and Xena fans unite!!, December 13, 2002
This review is from: Ginger Snaps (DVD)
Fans of Xena and La Femme Nikita may remember director John Fawcett from some of the best episodes on both shows. Now he brings us his film "Ginger Snaps". A bizarre screenplay from Karen Waldon, this brilliant movie is a gross werewolf story that serves as a mask for a much more gruesome tale: teen-years. By accurately showing the "horror" teenagers can go for in discovering their own bodies, their own changes, their own "powers", this movie is what "The Craft" could've been. Think of it as "Carrie" with a werewolf twist.
Ginger and Brigitte Fitzpatrick are a couple of teenage girls living in a really dull suburbia. But these are not your typical American-Pie-gals. Gin and Bri are true outcasts, with a serious contempt for everyone else in their school. On the night of her first menstruation, Ginger is attacked by a werewolf, and when she suddenly starts becoming one, no one will be safe, not even her dear sister.
One of the strong points for this movie is the transformation from human to wolf. It's a great thing that they decided not to go with CGI effects, but rather they used some very old-fashioned make-up tricks. Two thumbs up for that! It made me remember those all-time classics like "The Howling" and "An American Werewolf in London". Also, it portrays the horrors of adolescence in a dark, cerebral way (also with a very twisted sense of humor) that puts to shame all that nonsense from no-brainer teen flicks like "American Pie". The cast is wonderful. The two sisters (complete strangers to me) are great, and Mimi Roger's as their mom is a marvelous and funny character.
Now, for such a good movie, this edition is a crying shame. I hope the people at Amazon.com decide to include on their catalog the excellent Collector's Edition made in Canada, with full biography of the cast and crew, 2 commentary tracks by John Fawcett and Karen Waldon and several other features, including a slideshow of Ginger and Brigitte's school project. Wherever you get it, be sure to watch this movie. It barely got some attention at theaters over here, but I can guarantee you that you're standing in front of a future cult classic.
Also, for all Xena fans around the world, Lucy Lawless has a small voice cameo in this movie as the woman in the school's PA system.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Intense, Frightening, And Extremely Clever..., October 23, 2001
By 
family dogg (athens, GA USA) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Ginger Snaps (DVD)
GINGER SNAPS ranks just under AN AMERICAN WEREWOLF IN LONDON in my list of the best werewolf movies ever made. It's amazing to see such a well-made horror film that centers on young people, especially these days. It takes its subject very seriously, yet still manages to inject shades of dark humor at times. My favorite aspect of this film is that things never happened the way I expected them to, and given that I'm a lifelong horror fan, that's not something I normally see. I highly recommend GINGER SNAPS to anyone who likes to get scared while not having their intelligence insulted.
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Ginger Snaps
Ginger Snaps by Emily Perkins (DVD - 2005)
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