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Girl Goddess #9: Nine Stories Paperback – February 6, 1998


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 192 pages
  • Publisher: HarperTeen; Reprint edition (February 6, 1998)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 006447187X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0064471879
  • Product Dimensions: 0.5 x 4.1 x 6.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 3.2 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (77 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,387,903 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

Movie stars, rock stars, pond nymphs, intergalactic superheroes . . . who are the real goddesses in Francesca Lia Block's world? Real young women--the kind who ache, bleed, dance, and talk to blue ghosts in closets. Famous for her lyric Weetzie Bat books, Block blossoms in this collection of short stories about love: straight, gay, familial, and otherworldly. Very few young adult authors talk as frankly as Block about sex and some of the other yearnings we feel in this world, yet she guides her readers toward the self-respect and courage necessary to make smart choices about those yearnings. --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

From Publishers Weekly

From the author of Weetzie Bat comes a collection of tales that challenges conventional social roles. "The roses, camellias and jacarandas of Block's lush prose style scent these works with a heady perfume," said PW in a starred review. Ages 12-up. (Feb.) r
Copyright 1998 Reed Business Information, Inc.

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Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
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See all 77 customer reviews
I read this book in one night.
T. Ferrell
The feeling that you can get off just one of the stories is maybe better than the feeling you get from reading a full novel.
Karen Pandora Hakken
I highly recommend this book- especially for parents and children to read together.
Amazon Customer

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

15 of 15 people found the following review helpful By Kieri VINE VOICE on January 13, 2003
Format: Paperback
I look back now, and I realize that Girl Goddess #9 was a big part of my formative years. It was the first FLB book, and it still one of my favorites.
When I read the title story, I remember thinking, "Well,I like Sarah McLachlan, maybe I should give Tori Amos a try." (If you don't know how that story ended, well, know that I think nothing of driving ten hours to go to a Tori concert.) And, a year or so later, I re-read the story and thought, "Hey, I like Sarah and Tori, maybe I should try the Cocteau Twins." Thus began another addiction which annually saps me about fifty bucks.
I was going through major issues with a very dear friend as I read "Pixie and Pony," and for years now, those words have stayed with me: "Best friends? We are sisters." After my mother's injury, I struggled to reconcile the reality of her new self with the way she had once been. The story "La" was of enormous help.
GG#9 is every girl's diary. It is all of our fears and hopes and drems. It is everything we've questioned about life, our futures, our parents, our sexuality, and love. Each girl is perfectly unique, very mysterious, and yet completely familiar. Each of these girls is like a little facet of each other, and of ourselves.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on January 1, 2000
Format: Paperback
Out of all of Francesca Lia Block's books, I think this is one of the best. Although I don't particularly like short stories in general, this book left me captivated. My favorite is Blue because it was so touching, and Ms.Block's writing style is so lyrical that it really brings out the sadness even more than imaginable.(it made me cry!) Anyway, the whole collection of short stories was great, and this is one book I'll be reading again and again.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Ashley on July 24, 2002
Format: Paperback
Girl Goddess # 9 is a book by Francesca Lia Block. This book contains nine short stories about girls and how in every girl there is a goddess. They are all breathtakingly descriptive. It didn't take me long to finish this masterpiece!
I'm a huge fan of Block's writing style and this book was one that takes you into its world from the beginning and doesn't let you out until the last page has been read and you're left with the aftertaste of Block's stories.
The first story Tweetie Sweet Pea, is about being young and innocense. It's a great opener for this book. Blue was one of my personal favorites. When La looses her mother (her mother took her own life) she hides all her feelings in and has no friends. Until she meets an odd character from her closet who is blue.
Dragons in Manhattan is one of the best short stories I've read. It's about a girl with two mothers who are lovers and she goes on a search to find her father. Rave is narrated by a boy who talks of a highschool love named Rave.
Winnie and Cubby is about two highschool lovers one who a shocking secret revealed later in the story.
Other stories include Girl Goddess # 9, The Canyon, Pixie and Pony, and Orpheus.
This book is not to be missed!
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on October 17, 1998
Format: Paperback
the best book you can ever possibly read. its not trashy, not sappy, not phoney. and its not boring. the most realistic stories, yet told in a magical pixie-punk way. and they're not superficial. they are the whole raw truth of the world and feelings of the humans living in it. i could not put it down. my personal favorite story is blue. it purly touched my soul in a way no other story ever could or will. basically,to sum up my feelings about this book, the most wonderful book of stories in the world, as best i can, is to say that you feel for the characters. you move with the characters you become the characters. This book is pure magic.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Chosroes III on April 28, 2002
Format: Paperback
In "Pixie and Pony" a seemingly trite, even shallow emotional need is shown to be an important part of a sensitive young person's life-- the need to call someone her best friend. That story is one of the less dramatic pieces in this collection, but it resonates the more you read it. And it's one of the most lyrically written stories in the bunch, which is high praise considering the lush profusion of sights, sounds and smells evoked in these pages. Those who have attempted Block's novels and found them too overwhelmingly whimsical might want to give these stories a shot-- in the shorter format, Block can scale down some of the name-dropping catalogs of cool and focus in on the emotions at the heart of her tales. The novella-length "Dragons in Manhattan" tackles some of the themes of the middle Weetzie Bat books, but with more directness and a somewhat brisker sense of humor, thanks to our heroine Tuck and her hilariously-titled dances. The title story gives probably the first evidence of a sense of irony from this author-- and it's refreshing to see some of her heroines' pretensions get popped, while leaving their self-respect intact and even heightened. "Blue" and "Rave" are the most devastating stories here; "Rave" concerns a doomed groupie and the narrator who loves her-- the epilogue is particularly rich in its evocation of the emotional aftershocks of his relationship with her. "Blue" is more hopeful, but also even more painful in its depiction of a cavernous loneliness-- it's one of the best short stories of our time. The final story "Orpheus" relates to the experiences of the twenties, bringing the collection to an ambiguous conclusion--though, judging from the autobiographical hints, everything comes out right in the end.Read more ›
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