Buy New
$9.67
Qty:1
  • List Price: $9.95
  • Save: $0.28 (3%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 1 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Add to Cart
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Girl with the Golden Eyes Paperback – October 30, 2008


See all 8 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$9.67
$9.66 $11.99

Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Hero Quick Promo
Browse in Books with Buzz and explore more details on selected titles, including the current pick, "The Good Girl" by Mary Kubica.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 156 pages
  • Publisher: Wildside Press (October 30, 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1434476073
  • ISBN-13: 978-1434476074
  • Product Dimensions: 0.4 x 8.4 x 5.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8.8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #4,163,692 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars
5 star
4
4 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
1
See all 5 customer reviews
Very good kindle format (scan of the original piece).
Amazon Customer
And here the novel yet again changes style and language, shifting towards the unexpected.
Henry Martin
If you want to undertake reading some of these classics, this is a great choice.
MNDoc

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By MNDoc on April 13, 2012
Format: Kindle Edition
There are a large number of ebooks available for free in the public domain. This is one of many by Honore de Balzac as part of La Comédie humaine. Great translation from the original French. If you want to undertake reading some of these classics, this is a great choice. I suggest you look up Balzac on Wikipedia to help choose which of his books you want to read and in what order. The book makes more sense as part of a Trilogy The Thirteen. Read them in order. This is the third. The ending is both timely and unexpected. Enjoy.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By monica on December 27, 2013
Format: Paperback
Oh good lord this is car-crash writing. The book begins with a prolonged rant, one that's too po-faced in its earnestness to be enjoyable and packed too full with easy stereotypes to be worth considering. The story following it is stock melodrama, but again, good lord. A powerful secret society, Circassian slaves, a mysterious and of course menacing mulatto, a poisoned duenna, love secrets of the Orient, suddenly-discovered blood ties (hey! you look like me! that can only mean that you're my half-sister!), love that dare not speak its name, premonitions of death, attempted murder, and far too late--given that it signals the book's end--actual murder. The problem isn't simply that these elements are if not in themselves lurid used luridly, but that they are so often irrelevant and unnecessary, seemingly thrown together in a haphazard way: the writing feels as sloppy as it does silly. And the book isn't so bad it's fun, either, simply because it's surprisingly uninteresting; in fact despite its novella length I ended up skimming some of it. It's rubbish, it would have been rubbish in 1835, and that it was written by Balzac doesn't alleviate its rubbishness. In fact, I've tried to think of some aspect that does alleviate it, but if there is one it isn't plot, character, dialogue, diction, incident, organisation, creativity, or acuity.

If read it you must, it's free online. I suppose it might be worth having a look at for its oddness quotient; in fact I'll probably keep my copy because the book is so odd.
Read more ›
7 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Kindle Edition
** spoiler alert ** The Girl with the Golden Eyes...such an unassuming title. If one considers Balzac to be one of the classical writers, than one would reach for this book thinking it would go along the lines of other classic novellas. Hmmm...the title sounds almost romantic.

The Girl with the Golden Eyes is an interesting piece of literature. Despite its short length, it could be divided into three separate books: First, the reader is introduced to the scene - Parisian life - in no flattering terms.
"In Paris, there are only two ages, youth and decay: a bloodless, pallid youth and a decay painted to seem youthful." or "Everything is tolerated: the government and the guillotine, religion and cholera. You are always welcome in this world, and you are never missed." Here Balzac splits the Parisians into three main classes. "The class that has nothing: The worker, the proletarian, the man who lives by his feet, his hands, his tongue, his back, his good arm, his five fingers."
Balzac blatantly exposes this class with severe judgement, observing the never-ending labor whose fruits are blown away at the end of the week: "Then they take their pleasure and relaxation in an exhausting debauch, which leaves their skin brown with filth, black and blue with violence, blotched with drunkenness, or yellow with indigestion. This lasts only two days but steals tomorrow's bread, the weekly soup, the wife's new dress, and swaddling for the ragged child."
Then there are the workers who see future, save money, and start a small shop - the "...king of Parisian scene who has submitted to time and space.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on March 4, 2012
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This was a fantastic product, great at a price. Very good kindle format (scan of the original piece). Helpful dictionary use.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
0 of 1 people found the following review helpful By W. Rawady on January 4, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Can't beat Balzac for historically accurate and intriguing tales and this one does it again. The heroine of this story is absolutely fascinating and as a reader, you will jockey back and forth with sympathy and judgement. A quick read and one of his best. The translation has a few stumbles but it is nothing that will ruin the story. Definitely one to download to your Kindle for the beach!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Search