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  • Girl of the Golden West [VHS]
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Girl of the Golden West [VHS]


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Girl of the Golden West [VHS] + Sweethearts (1938) [VHS] + New Moon [VHS]
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Product Details

  • Actors: Jeanette MacDonald, Nelson Eddy, Walter Pidgeon, Leo Carrillo, Buddy Ebsen
  • Directors: Robert Z. Leonard
  • Writers: Boyce DeGaw, David Belasco, Isabel Dawn
  • Producers: Robert Z. Leonard, William Anthony McGuire
  • Format: Black & White, NTSC
  • Rated: NR (Not Rated)
  • Number of tapes: 1
  • Studio: MGM (Warner)
  • VHS Release Date: December 11, 1992
  • Run Time: 121 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (40 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: 6301969243
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #338,884 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)

Editorial Reviews

New VHS Tape; sealed shrink wrap (as shown) "Girl of the Golden West [VHS]" FAST shipping...(T14)

Customer Reviews

Beautiful singing, and wonderful music!
songbird
Thought I'd give you good folks a heads up if you didn't already know.
E. Sadowski
Truly as delightful as any Nelson Eddy and Jeanette MacDonald movie!
"phoenixe36"

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

32 of 33 people found the following review helpful By "phoenixe36" on December 7, 2000
Format: VHS Tape
I was pleasantly surprised when I first saw this movie- somewhere I'd gotten the impression that it wasn't going to be as enjoyable as other MacEddy movies, which just wasn't so. Nelson's voice is as luscious as ever and he is just as debonair and romantic in his portrayal of the swashbuckling Ramerez. Jeanette's character is less coquettish and more open and trusting than her usual which was a nice change. Ramerez, stolen from his own family as a baby, becomes the infamous leader of a group of mexican bandits (his own more trusting instincts becoming stifled when his adoptive father is shot while offering help to white settlers.) The plot develops delightedly as Ramerez falls for Mary, who owns the local saloon and is being courted by the town's sheriff, who in turn is trying to track down Ramerez (echoes of Rose Marie but with a twist.) Girl of the Golden West may not have produced any musical hits but Jeanette and Nelson's numbers are still entrancing, especially Jeanette's version of Liebestraum. (And who can resist the grand dance production, Mariachi, along with Nelson's song Dance With Me and spectacular exit from that scene.) Truly as delightful as any Nelson Eddy and Jeanette MacDonald movie!
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18 of 20 people found the following review helpful By "maryn2" on February 9, 2002
Format: VHS Tape
Two hours of this fast-moving 1938 saga of Old California West is a little long. Color would have helped black and white long shots... so often mottled like ink on a blotter; a forgiven price we sometimes have to pay for these wonderful old movie gems.
The story features Poker Saloon owner Mary (Jeanette MacDonald) who talks like a hillbilly, walks like a cow but sings like an angel. The irony is palpable with classics like "Liebestraum" (Is Love a Dream?) and "Ave Maria" (Gounod's).
Our swashbuckler leading man Ramerez (Nelson Eddy) leads a pack of South-of-the-Border desperados to steal gold from stagecoaches and have fun in the process. As a phony Mexican bandito, Ramerez follows the Robin Hood tradition of taking from the rich to give to the Monterey mission. His bold sombrero covers his golden hair (but not his golden heart) and his mask exposes only his dark eyes, vivid without the distraction of a lipsticked mouth; a method apparently acceptable to actors of the`30s. To this, throw in Leo Carrillo as Ramerez's jolly sidekick and the transformation is believable.
Mary quickly comes to love Ramerez, believing him to be the gentlemanly Lt. Johnson assigned her as festival escort. Mary's devoted pals in the Poker Saloon genuinely love and respect her. No other woman do we see there ever, suggesting that only two kinds of women frequent bars; those like Mary who own the place and bar maids who would cheapen it. No objection to this omission from the director, but what an opportunity missed in a movie of that time..
"Alabama" (Buddy Ebsen), who hides unspoken feelings, accepts that he is not in Mary's league but loves her anyway and expects nothing.
Sheriff Rance (Walter Pidgeon) on the other hand , expects everything. He knows Mary favors Ramerez/Lt.
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17 of 19 people found the following review helpful By "scotsladdie" on January 28, 2003
Format: VHS Tape
This was the fifth time around for this story. Originally, it was a play by David Belasco in 1905; it was made as three silents as well as an opera. In this version, Eddy and MacDonald were at the height of their popularity: their finest effort - MAYTIME - was filmed the year prior. The screenplay isn't exactly superlative and the direction drags a bit, but fans of the great singing duo should still find themselves semi-enthralled. Jeanette owns a rough gambling saloon and Nelson is a Zorro-like character - but on the wrong side of the law. They fall in love, naturally. The best number in the film is the elaborate MARIACHI number. Buddy Ebsen, who plays Alabama, is in fine form and gives the movie some much-needed comedic moments. Monty Wooley can be seen briefly as the Governor. Melodies include Liszt's beautiful LIEBESTRAUM, THE WIND IN THE TREES, SUN-UP TO SUNDOWN & AVE MARIE....{What a deux mixture!!} Oddly enough, Ray Bolger was originally singing and dancing in this film, but his scenes were deleted. Why is this strange? We all know that Bolger went on into cinema immortality as the Scarecrow the next year in M-G-M's enduring classic WIZARD OF OZ. But many forget that Ebsen was the studio's first choice for the Tinman. Because he was highly allergic - he nearly died - to the aluminum dust mixed into paste for the Tinman's make-up, he was ultimately replaced with Jack Haley.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By B. Wilson on March 8, 2009
Format: VHS Tape
In spite of the movie's slow beginning and Nelson Eddy's terrible makeup, the story makes for enjoyable entertainment. Individually Jeanette MacDonald (Mary "Girl" Robbins) and Eddy (Ramirez) are very good in their roles, but the usual on-screen chemistry between them is strained due to circumstances in their personal lives which affected their interaction. The movie's major weaknesses revolve around that strained relationship and are compounded by the fact that in relation to their other movies they have very little screen time together.

To understand the weaknesses in the movie it helps to know that screen sweethearts Eddy & MacDonald were also in love in real life, but studio boss L.B. Mayer was determined to keep them apart and succeeded in coercing Jeanette into a marriage with actor Gene Raymond. The Girl of the Golden West was the first movie made by the MacDonald & Eddy team after Jeanette's marriage. Nelson was having trouble dealing with her marriage and was drinking heavily to drown his sorrows (thus the need for the overdone makeup). Jeanette, who dicovered on her honeymoon that her groom was not the man she thought him to be, was trying hard to keep up appearances as a "happy" newlywed, when she was in fact miserable.

The situation on the set of GGW was an emotional rollercoaster for both stars and the strain came to a head during the filming of the "Obey Your Heart" number. Intended as a duet, the song was ultimately sung as a solo by Nelson because Jeanette kept breaking down in tears. After repeated takes, she was able to sit numbly while Nelson sang alone but the viewer can clearly see her expression is at odds with a woman having a love song sung to her. She looks numb and drained and ready to burst into tears again when Eddy takes her hands in his.
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