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Girls: Season 1


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Product Details

  • Actors: Various
  • Directors: Various
  • Format: Multiple Formats, AC-3, Color, Dolby, DTS Surround Sound, Full Screen, NTSC, Widescreen
  • Language: French (Dolby Digital 5.1), Spanish (Dolby Digital 2.0 Surround)
  • Subtitles: English, French, Spanish, Portuguese
  • Region: Region 1 (U.S. and Canada only. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.78:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Rated: NR (Not Rated)
  • Studio: HBO Studios
  • DVD Release Date: December 11, 2012
  • Run Time: 390 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (437 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B008CFZQQS
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #4,913 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)
  • Learn more about "Girls: Season 1" on IMDb

Special Features

None.

Editorial Reviews

Product Description

From writer/director/actor Lena Dunham and comedy veterans Judd Apatow and Jenni Konner, this scripted half-hour series focuses on a group of 20-something women in New York and their adventures in post-collegiate floundering. Two years out of liberal arts school, Hannah (Dunham) believes she has the talent to be a successful writer, and though she has yet to complete her memoir (she has to live it first), her parents cut her off financially without warning. Further complicating things for Hannah is her unrequited passion for eccentric actor Adam, with whom she occasionally has sex (when he can be bothered to respond to her text messages). As the harsh reality of rent and bills looms, Hannah leans on her very-put-together best friend and roommate Marnie, who has a real job at an art gallery and an even realer boyfriend (neither of which she can admit she might not love). Meanwhile, their gorgeous British friend Jessa, who has travelled to as many different countries as she’s had boyfriends, appears in the city and moves in with Shoshanna, her naïve younger cousin with Sex and the City lifestyle aspirations. Over the course of Season 1’s ten episodes, the four girls try to figure out what they want – from life, from boys, from themselves and each other. The answers aren’t always clear or easy, but the search is profoundly relatable and infinitely amusing.

Amazon.com

Lena Dunham mocks the idea of being a voice to a generation, but there's no question she's captured something ineffably of the moment in her sitcom Girls. Dunham writes and directs most episodes and stars as Hannah, a smart but self-flagellating writer floundering in the urban wilds of New York City. Both an homage and a counterpoint to Sex in the City, Girls has its own quartet: Hannah, who's just been financially cut off by her parents; Marnie (Allison Williams), lovely but uptight, who's bored by her too devoted boyfriend Charlie (Christopher Abbott); Jessa (Jemima Kirke), a transplant from England who keeps her true feelings hidden under a cool surface; and Shoshanna (Zosia Mamet), a hapless chatterbox who's ashamed that she's still a virgin. All of these girls, grappling with adult life, can be funny, irritating, embarrassing, and richly sympathetic--sometimes at the same time.

Girls doesn't tackle themes per episode; instead, it's a series of moments, vividly observed and often joltingly funny social interaction and sexual relationships (some graphically depicted, with all the freedom that cable television allows). Dunham doesn't explain everything all at once, but gives only glimpses into the characters in each episode. At first, Hannah's relationship with Adam (Adam Driver) seems horribly one-sided, but by the end of the 10-episode season, the picture changes completely (and going back to watch previous episodes with new eyes is rewarding). While Hannah, Marnie, Jessa, and Shoshanna may suffer from the neurotic self-absorption of twentysomethings, Dunham and her cocreators do not; everyone in Girls is multidimensional, including parents and men on the periphery (Charlie's friend Ray, played by Alex Karpovsky, grows from some jerk to one of the more intriguing characters on the show). It's rare that comedy and compassion are so well-balanced. Like a microscope, Girls focuses on a tiny sliver of the world, but within that sliver lies abundant life. The Complete First Season also has an abundance of extra features, including auditions, deleted scenes, commentary tracks, interviews with the cast, and a revealing and lively conversation between Dunham and producer Judd Apatow. --Bret Fetzer

Customer Reviews

Great writing and acting.
musemate
Typically, there's a bunch of perfect looking, rich career women complaining about problems they wouldn't actually face in real life.
Discerning
Very funny, energetic, surprising show.
Jazmine P

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

Format: Blu-ray
HBO's "Girls" seems to be one of those love-it or hate-it propositions and I'm not quite sure why. Its creator and star, Lena Dunham, burst onto the scene with the micro-budgeted indie "Tiny Furniture" in 2010. Embraced enthusiastically by critics, the young talent was branded a new voice in contemporary comedy. But as the picture became more widely seen (it is available in a 2-disc Criterion edition), the backlash began. "Girls" has some of the same situations, concerns, stars, pacing and humor as the feature film and all of the supposed negatives that applied to "Tiny Furniture" have followed Dunham to "Girls." The show is still a huge critical success, it just seems to lack universal appeal. The most common complaint, I suppose, is that it creates a very insular world populated with pretty self-involved characters. It's a fair point, to be sure. But for everyone who says that Dunham doesn't "speak for their generation," I say that she never intended to. She speaks about her world, her life, and the things that she knows. It may not be identifiable to everyone, but it is eminently real and utterly believable! The world created in "Girls" exists and Dunham has skewered it perfectly creating a fresh comedy that is simultaneously absurd and truthful. This is a generation that has yet to find its purpose.

"Girls" is centered around four young women trying to navigate the pitfalls on the way to responsibility and adulthood. The characters ably showcase a combination of post-collegiate ennui and over-educated (and pseudo-intellectual) entitlement. Set in a fashionable New York City young, artistic and urban environment--the show's sardonic tone and cultural critique really speak to this specific subset of individuals.
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Lauren on August 26, 2013
Format: Amazon Instant Video Verified Purchase
I'm in love with this show!! Coming from a 25 yr old girl who moved from a tiny town to the big city a few years ago after graduating from college, this show is EXTREMELY accurate and relatable. Unlike Sex & the City (which I should note is still one of my absolute favorites) the girls in this show are not glamorized and its not made to look like its easy to start out a life in NYC. Its exactly the kind of humor I love (which I understand isn't for everyone considering some of the previous reviews) and it has just enough drama. If you're easily offended or are just not a fan of crude humor, this probably isn't the show for you. But for everyone else-- ENJOY because there is no other show like this on TV right now!!
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20 of 25 people found the following review helpful By Leonard on January 1, 2013
Format: DVD
I'm a 27 years old (28 in 3 weeks) African-American male. I'm obviously not the target demographic of the show. However, for some reason, I like these girly shows (and before you ask, I'm straight). I was a fan of Gossip Girl until it became stupid towards the end. Initially, I wasn't planning on watching this series, but I saw about a million advertisements for Girls in the NYC Subway. I finally decided to succumb to peer pressure. I bought the season 1 DVD from Target and watched the entire season in 3 days.

I can definitely see why some people dislike this show, but most of the episodes are entertaining. Watching this show requires some suspension of disbelief. The protagonist of the series is Hannah, a self-conscious and slightly overweight (but definitely not fat) girl in her mid-20's. Although she is book smart, she is completely dense. She once made a joke about date rape during a job interview. She quit another job she had after her ~60 year old boss refused to have sex with her. She reminds me of a female version of George Constanza. Hannah's frenemy is Marnie (sp?), an attractive but insecure girl. Hannah and Marnie have their cat fights and usually make up in the next episode.

Jessa is a hot British girl. She's an eccentric, pot-smoking party girl, like a raunchier Phoebe Buffay. Shoshanna (sp?) is the innocent virgin (SPOILER: she loses her virginity in the season finale).

What I didn't like about this series is that all of the male characters are douches. Adam, Hannah's borderline abusive boyfriend, is the dumb jock type. He rarely has a shirt on. He reminds me of Kelso from That 70's Show. Elijah is a recurring guest star. He's Hannah's ex-boyfriend who turned gay. He is the gay stereotype. Charlie is Marnie's boyfriend.
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260 of 352 people found the following review helpful By Feeding Stars to Cats on July 10, 2012
Format: Blu-ray
I'm 20, slightly younger than the "Girls" on this show, but close enough in age that plenty of their problems are relate-able for me. I was really excited for this show - it was like Sex and the City but with younger characters; characters who didn't have great jobs and were NOT yet in a place where they would be really looking for husbands or ready to have children.

Sadly, the first episode left kind of a bad taste in my mouth and so did the following ones until I let the series go about 3/4 the way into the season.

I think my main problem is the central character, Hannah. I really just couldn't bring myself to like her, which is odd because I think the actress who plays her (also the creator of the show!) Lena Dunham is lovely, and I'm taking a leap by assuming she based a lot of Hannah's personality off of herself.

You see, in the first episode she tries to convince her parents to keep financially supporting her by claiming she "feels that she is to voice of her generation...or something (yes, that was heavily paraphrased). I have nothing against aiming big, that's not it. It's just I feel that you can change the world and hold down a paying job at the same time. Also, with the job market still so rocky, wouldn't a better argument be "I just really don't know when I'm going to be able to find a paying job?"

Then later on she blows a huge job interview by making, and I am not kidding, a rape joke. Okay, I must admit that I am absolutely not the master of small talk or impressive job interviews but I feel that you would have to be ABSOLUTELY INCOMPETENT to make a rape joke (!) during a freaking JOB INTERVIEW, even with a friendly, like-minded interviewer. I doubt somebody in middle school would ever make that joke - much less a 25 year old woman.
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