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143 of 147 people found the following review helpful
on October 30, 2010
I was a member of George Company, 3rd Battalion, 1st Marine Regiment, 1st Marine Division or G-3-1 in Korea. I've waited for 60 years for someone to tell our story. Fate must have sent Patrick O'Donnell to uncover this story before it was too late.

He brought this story to vivid interest and readability. We were 19 and 20 year olds that had to be the least trained Marines going into a battle. In World War ll we usually outnumbered the enemy but in Korea it was the opposite. Usually 10-20 to 1.

I still can't believe we did what we did.
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51 of 52 people found the following review helpful
on October 30, 2010
Give Me Tomorrow is an amazing untold story about Marines who faced unbelievable odds. At the Chosin Reservior, these Marines fought a relentless enemy, weather which dipped into the minus 40s, no food (just Tootsie Rolls and handfuls of snow), and no shelter, just shallow foxholes. The book focuses George Company which battled through a division of Chinese troops and held the "Little Round Top of Korea," East Hill, against a regiment of Chinese troops. Their epic stand wasn't a one-time occurrence, the company remarkably made five epic stands (Seoul, Task Force Drysdale, East Hill, Hill 902, and on the last day and battle of the Korean War at a forgotten outpost called Boulder City). This book is action packed, a page turner which puts the reader in the boots of these Marines, and mostly in the words of these heroes.
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28 of 29 people found the following review helpful
on October 25, 2010
"Give Me Tomorrow" is one of my favorite books. I knew next to nothing about the Korean War until I read this epic story. Unlike traditional histories, this reads in a very cinematic manner and focuses around a core group of Marines. The book is an amazing story of true courage and survival. These men fought in temperatures approaching 40 below zero, no food and against odds at 20 or more to one--amazing! The men of George Company and the "Frozen Chosen" are all true heroes. If you want to understand the Forgotten Ware read this book!!
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15 of 15 people found the following review helpful
on October 27, 2010
I'm a history buff and this is the best combat book I have ever read. The author takes the word of the combatants and makes a "I don't want to put the book down" kind of story out of their experience. Great up front action!!!!!!!!!
I know how well the author covered the story because I was a member of G/3/1 and I'm mentioned in the book.
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17 of 18 people found the following review helpful
on May 11, 2011
Give Me Tomorrow is a Book that covers the Marine Corps Rifle Company (G-3-1) that I was in during this time frame (Sept 15 1950 to Dec 5, 1950).
I bought a copy for each of my family members, Siblings and Children, to give so they could get a record of the Battles that I was in and the Buddies that I served with and lost. It covers MSgt Rocco Zullo very well. His Voice, at Tent Camp II during August 1950 and Vibrated the Quansi Hut Roofs during Revelee. He was quite a Marine. I personaly think he deserves the Congressional Medal of Honor.
It covers the three battles that I was in (Inchon, Seoul, & Chosin Reservoir) very well and also gives some coverage in detail of how I was wounded (Nov. 30 1950) at the Chosin reservoir during Task Force Drysdale and evacuated. I missed the East Hill fire Fighting.
Thanks
Orace Leon Edwards (The Tall Texas Tee Totaler)
Arlington, Texas
I was actually born in Miller County, Arkansas but grew up Texarkana (Ark/Tex)
A Marine participant in Give Me Tomorrow.
It is Personal record for me.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
on November 8, 2010
With his most recent book, "Give Me Tomorrow", Patrick K. O'Donnell has made a critical and important contribution to the Korean War's published record. While there have been numerous ground-breaking books on Korea during the past 55 years or so, very few of them have touched on the personal experiences of the American fighting-man quite like O'Donnell's work. It is fair to describe this volume as a sort of "Band of Brothers" for Korean War history. In many ways it is, as it introduces a new generation of Americans to a company of Marines who fought and survived under conditions that many would find impossible. We can only hope that other authors will follow Mr. O'Donnell's lead and bring us more stories like this. This is certainly his finest book yet!
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
on October 12, 2013
I am sorry, but I believe the men of George company deserve better. Theirs is a truly heroic story, and one is delighted that the spotlight of history has shone on them. However, one wishes that they had a better proponent for their story.

I have any number of issues, but chief among them are the following:

1) Right at the start of the book, Mr. O'Donnell makes the unpardonable error of making himself central to the narrative.
2) His representation of Don Carlos Faith seemed extremely churlish. Col. Faith was awarded the Medal of Honor for his actions, but reading this book you would have never known it.
3) The backdrop of events and the historic detail associated with those events were off - particularly in the case of Taskforce Drysdale.
4) The devil is in the detail and the accuracy of the fact checking around those details really wasn't great - George Company's comrades in arms, for instance, were Royal Marines; not hard to get right, but Mr. O'Donnell persistently gets it wrong.
5) There were a number of peculiar footnotes, which were repetitious in nature, especially when compared to the text itself - why weren't these properly edited? This sloppiness smacks of filler when none is required in a set of stories so gripping in nature.
6) The "where are they now section" seemed sadly lacking - these are heroic men, and to know more about them and their lives would have been an honour.

In short, in my opinion, Mr. O'Donnell has taken the lazy man's approach to this book - he has simply let his heroic subjects do all the work through the brush strokes of their words alone. What he has failed to do is provide them, as was his reponsibilty as the named author, with the accurate, unobtrusive and reflective canvas on which their deeds deserve to have been painted.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
on January 2, 2011
I was immediately drawn to this book when I saw the iconic photograph on the front cover. I snapped it up to add to my growing collection on the Korean War. Once I began reading, I was drawn in and have had a hard time in putting it down. In two days I have read about 85% of the book. However, as much as I have enjoyed this book, I have found some mistakes in it that are absolutely infuriating. The first one that I found was on Page 11 when the attack on Pearl Harbor is mentioned as having taken place on June 7, 1941. I thought maybe it was a typo. But about a dozen lines later in referring to the Guadalcanal campaign the 5th Marine Division is mentioned. 5th MarDiv did not exist in 1942, but the 5th Marine Regiment of the 1st Marine Division was in existance and fighting on Guadalcanal. I found several other mistakes throughout the book including a near constant reference to the 3.5" Rocket Launcher as "the bazooka." As a former Marine with a 0351 MOS who used to be a gunner on the 3.5" rocket launcher I take offense to this. The bazooka was World War II. The 3.5 rocket launcher of Kroea, Vietnam an up into the mid 1970's was simply the "3.5" or the "rocket launcher." It was reinforced on us while in training at Camp Lejeune that referring to the 3.5 as a "bazooka" would be almost as grievous a sin as calling your rifle a "gun." I don't know if proof readers, editors or the author are responsible for those mistakes but they detract from the book by making me wonder if there are othr mistakes that I don't know about. None of the mistakes detracts from the courage of men of George Company 3/1/1 and the others who fought in the "Frozen Chosin." I am not worthy to carry their jock straps. This is one of the few amazing books out on this nearly forgotten aspect of the "Forgotten War." Another excellent book on "Frozen Chosin" is "The Last Stand of Fox Company" by Bob Drury and Tom Clavin. Anyone desiring to learn more abou the Korean War won't go wrong in buying both of these books. Semper Fi!
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9 of 11 people found the following review helpful
VINE VOICEon November 30, 2010
Give Me Tomorrow: The Korean War's Greatest Untold Story--The Epic Stand of the Marines of George Company by Patrick K. O'Donnell is undoubtedly one of the best books ever written about the Korean War. Forget that it is about a company of Marines, though as a former Marine, those words come hard. The insight into the Korean War contained in Give Me Tomorrow is surprising and very valuable.

George Company of the First Marines was quickly thrown together and trained in response to the aggression of North Korea in 1950. Landing in Korea and fighting door to door in Seoul, they eventually ended up at the Chosin Reservoir. Those of us who have passed through Marine Corps boot camp have learned our history well and are familiar with the battle of Frozen Chosin and the brilliant and heroic attacking retreat that followed. The Marines not only brought out their dead and wounded but most of their equipment also.

Most Marines when they get through basic training are usually teenagers. What makes them different from others of the same age is that they have been trained by professionals; Marine professionals. The young Marines of George Company were no different than any other Marine then or now. What they did makes them special. What's really amazing is that George Company didn't make one stand, but five separate do or die stands. They stopped the Chinese dead in their tracks every time. Imagine, one Marine rifle company against an entire regiment. Amazing!

Patrick K. O'Donnell is a masterful storyteller. However, simply telling the story isn't the meat of the process. Research is where the rubber meets the road. In preparing to write this book O'Donnell has interview scores of George Company survivors. They told him their stories and he reported those to us. This book is long overdue. They and their exploits are forgotten no longer.

Give Me Tomorrow is one of the best books of its type that I have read. I'd place it right next to Band of Brothers.

I highly recommend.

Semper Fi.
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14 of 18 people found the following review helpful
on November 14, 2011
What caught my attention with this book was the author's previous work, 'We Were One' regarding his time spent with 3/1 fighting the 2nd Battle of Fallujah in Iraq. That book was fantastic! Sad to say that if I had it to do over again, I would not have bought 'Give Me Tomorrow'. I read this book while in one sitting during a long plane flight and have read other books on the subject that I found much more informative. what really stood out was the author's duplication of small details and comments often times occurring only a few pages after originally mentioned. For example, he referred to then PFC Olmstead several times mentioning at least twice in the text and once in the footnotes that Olmstead went on to a successful active duty career as a Marine officer retiring as a LGen. Repetition of details like this lead me to believe that Mr. O'Donnell was trying to expand the text and add more 'fill'. I also got the feeling that his editors either overlooked things like this or had advised him to attempt to add more text. Either way, it was annoying and somewhat condescending to me as the reader. His `Where they are now' section at the end of the book was also lacked significant detail. Some names are just a rehash of the info provided in the text or earlier footnotes. (See Olmstead.) If you want solid books on the subject, try 'The Coldest War' by David Halberstam and 'Colder Than Hell' by Joe Owen or even Robert Heinl's classic,`Victory At High Tide'.
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