Start reading Give and Take: Why Helping Others Drives Our Success on the free Kindle Reading App or on your Kindle in under a minute. Don't have a Kindle? Get your Kindle here.

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

Add Audible Narration

Give and Take: A Revolutionary Approach to Success
Narrated by Brian Keith Lewis
$27.97 $12.99
Enter a promotion code
or gift card
 
 
 

Try it free

Sample the beginning of this book for free

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

Sorry, this item is not available in
Image not available for
Color:
Image not available

To view this video download Flash Player

 

Give and Take: Why Helping Others Drives Our Success [Kindle Edition]

Adam M. Grant Ph.D.
4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (347 customer reviews)

Print List Price: $16.00
Kindle Price: $7.99
You Save: $8.01 (50%)
Sold by: Penguin Group (USA) LLC

Free Kindle Reading App Anybody can read Kindle books—even without a Kindle device—with the FREE Kindle app for smartphones, tablets and computers.

To get the free app, enter your email address or mobile phone number.

Audible Narration

Switch back and forth between reading the Kindle book and listening to the Audible narration with Whispersync for Voice. Add narration for a reduced price of $12.99 when you buy the Kindle book.

Formats

Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition $7.99  
Hardcover $16.50  
Paperback $9.30  
Audible Audio Edition, Unabridged $0.00 Free with your Audible trial
Best Books of the Year
Best Books of 2014
Looking for something great to read? Browse our editors' picks for 2014's Best Books of the Year in fiction, nonfiction, mysteries, children's books, and much more.

Book Description

A groundbreaking New York Times and Wall Street Journal bestseller that is
captivating readers of Malcolm Gladwell, Daniel Pink, The Power of Habit, and Quiet


For generations, we have focused on the individual drivers of success: passion, hard work, talent, and luck. But today, success is increasingly dependent on how we interact with others. It turns out that at work, most people operate as either takers, matchers, or givers. Whereas takers strive to get as much as possible from others and matchers aim to trade evenly, givers are the rare breed of people who contribute to others without expecting anything in return.

Using his own pioneering research as Wharton's youngest tenured professor, Grant shows that these styles have a surprising impact on success. Although some givers get exploited and burn out, the rest achieve extraordinary results across a wide range of industries. Combining cutting-edge evidence with captivating stories, this landmark book shows how one of America's best networkers developed his connections, why the creative genius behind one of the most popular shows in television history toiled for years in anonymity, how a basketball executive responsible for multiple draft busts transformed his franchise into a winner, and how we could have anticipated Enron's demise four years before the company collapsed--without ever looking at a single number.

Praised by bestselling authors such as Dan Pink, Tony Hsieh, Dan Ariely, Susan Cain, Dan Gilbert, Gretchen Rubin, Bob Sutton, David Allen, Robert Cialdini, and Seth Godin--as well as senior leaders from Google, McKinsey, Merck, Estée Lauder, Nike, and NASA--Give and Take highlights what effective networking, collaboration, influence, negotiation, and leadership skills have in common. This landmark book opens up an approach to success that has the power to transform not just individuals and groups, but entire organizations and communities.


Editorial Reviews

From Booklist

An academic, Grant explains that added to hard work, talent, and luck, highly successful people need the ability to connect with others. We learn givers give more than they get, takers get more than they give, and matchers aim to give and get equally; all can succeed. The author’s aim is to explain why we underestimate the success of givers, to explore what separates giver champs from chumps, and what is unique about giver success. Emphasis on teams and the rise of the service sector offers givers access to opportunities that takers and matchers often miss. In the first section, the author explains his principles of giver success, and, in the second part, with insightful stories he explores the costs of giving and how givers can protect themselves against burnout and becoming pushovers; helping others does not compromise success. Grant concludes with his hope that this book will provide his young daughters’ generation with a new perspective on success. A worthy goal for this excellent book. --Mary Whaley

Review

Give and Take is perfectly timed and beautifully weighted...Above all, Grant's book is optimistic, a refreshing change after years of reading angry indictments of fallen corporate idols...(an) excellent book. -- Andrew Hill FINANCIAL TIMES Backed up by anecdotes of success across a range of industries and scenarios, as well as numerous academic studies, the arguments of Give and Take are grounded in ample research...His writing style draws you in...it's an interesting take on game theory in a practical context, and the notion that givers can succeed is an inspirational one. CITY AM

Product Details

  • File Size: 795 KB
  • Print Length: 321 pages
  • Page Numbers Source ISBN: 0670026557
  • Publisher: Penguin Books (April 9, 2013)
  • Sold by: Penguin Group (USA) LLC
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B00AFPTSI0
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Lending: Not Enabled
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #7,659 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
  •  Would you like to give feedback on images?


Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews
234 of 244 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Are You an Otherish Giver? April 10, 2013
Format:Hardcover|Vine Customer Review of Free Product (What's this?)
I've been reading this book for a few days now - finished it yesterday - and I am already finding myself changing a bit of how I operate. According to the book, I am usually a matcher - one who gives reciprocally, when I figure I can receive in return. And there isn't much wrong with that. But, according to Adam Grant and his bevy of research, otherish givers are usually the most successful.

So, let me explain.

There are three broad styles of interpersonal dealing: taking, matching, and giving. Takers are those who try to take more than they give. Matchers are those who try to give and take proportaionally and conditionally. Givers are those who give more than they take. Takers are primarily self-oriented, matchers are other-oriented as a means to being self-oriented (I'll help you when I think you will help me) and givers are primarily other-oriented.

Here's the counter-intuitive part. If we look at the most successful people - the happiest, the most likely to be promoted, etc - they are generally givers, and if we look at the least successful, they too often tend to be givers. (Takers do moderately well, but over time, few want to deal with them. Matchers do okay too.)

This book is an attempt to explain why being a giver is a good 'strategy' for success, as well as under what conditions giving is a failing 'strategy.' First, the positive: simply put, people appreciate givers and giving often makes people want to give back. Since givers help others and often put others' needs as a priority, givers often garner (without deliberately trying - AND THAT IS KEY!) a network of support from others they've helped. Want to communicate most effectively? Ask more questions to others than you give answers, ask for advice, and be aware of how you can help others.
Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you?
118 of 134 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars I want to live in a world where givers do well. April 11, 2013
Format:Hardcover|Verified Purchase
First, a disclosure: I'm one of the people whose stories are featured in Adam Grant's book.

I don't read a lot of books, but I'm glad I read "Give and Take".

I agree with the reviewer who says the book is worth reading for the first and last chapters alone.

The first chapter explains why people who give are more successful in business.

The last chapter ("Actions for Impact") is a short, useful list of practical tools to apply the book's principles in life.

The rest of the book is filled with good stories, too, but those are a bonus.

I think overall this is an important book. If more business leaders succeed through principled giving of time, energy, connections, and knowledge, the world will be a better place.

I want to live in a world where more people have this kind of success.
Was this review helpful to you?
135 of 158 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars 4 Star Book . . . Give Or Take A Star . . . March 31, 2013
Format:Hardcover|Vine Customer Review of Free Product (What's this?)
I have been looking forward to this book because I have heard so many positive things about it leading up to its release. It is a very well written book, and I am looking forward to reading more from Adam Grant in the future (a business professor who is a professional magician too . . . only good things can come from that combination). As talented as Grant is, and you can tell just from reading it how much work he poured into the book, I felt that it fell short in ways that other recent books have succeeded.

The basic premise of the book is that "Givers" are more successful in the long run, for a variety of reasons. This is especially true now in the United States because so many people, up to 80%, work in a service industry. Giving pays huge dividends, and Grant proves his theory with anecdotal evidence backed up by research studies.

What I Liked:

* The first chapter was very good. The argument that givers are more successful across a wide variety of fields is made succinctly, and the evidence is hard to argue with.
* Love all the practical tools in the last chapter.
* Stories chosen throughout the book are all new to me - no rehashing from other business books, which is a plus.

What I Didn't Like:

* Though the stories are different, I was not compelled by most of them. They were interesting, but the connection to the chapter material lacked in some places.
* The first and last chapter were great, but I would rate the middle as mediocre. Every chapter felt like it was just too long, like the publisher had a quota to fill and just stretched the material as far as it would go to get up to 300 pages.
* While I agree with the premise, I'm not sure I would be convinced if I hadn't already been on his side before reading the book.
Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you?
252 of 305 people found the following review helpful
Format:Hardcover
In reading reviews of this book, ask yourself whether it is the book being reviewed, or is it the premise (concept) of the book. I re-read the reviews that enticed me into reading this book and found that, under a critical reading, they seemed to be predominantly the latter. And when you encounter a review that lauds the book as "new", "revolutionary"... while also contrarily reporting its content as "well-known", "proven" or an established part of the reviewer's professional life, be skeptical.*

My background: I am in my 60s and I now read this category of book not for myself, but to assist in my mentoring of others. I spent my career in high tech, 30 years in Silicon Valley.

At the core of my negative reaction to this book is a difference in world view. The book claims that "givers are a rare breed of people" (inside of jacket). My experience is that they are hardly rare**, and there are daily reminders of that -- for example the response to the recent Boston Marathon bombing. What you see are many people who are _reflexively_ givers (no pause for calculation). Note: I am not denying the existence of "takers" and "matchers", but take issue with the book's estimates of their numbers as being too high.

The book's subtitle "A Revolutionary Approach to Success" reveals how divorced from reality it is. The characteristics of the "giver" have long been taught in a wide range of leadership courses -- the only thing new here is the name. The "Servant Model" of Christianity (and other religions) is often invoked in these leadership courses, including some by the US military.

The book even argues against itself: It opens with a study claiming that "givers" dominate the group of most successful people and later argues that this is not invisible.
Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you?
Most Recent Customer Reviews
4.0 out of 5 stars Very interesting examples and insiders perspective on the very...
Very interesting examples and insiders perspective on the very important minds of the very important industries of our time (and of the past).
Published 2 days ago by Thistles
5.0 out of 5 stars This is the best book I've read in 2014
This is the best book I've read in 2014. Wonderful view of the world as a place where people give (time, money, help) for the sake of giving, and it just so happens that many of... Read more
Published 2 days ago by Joe Markley
5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars
Great book! The author put into words the value of coming from contribution.
Published 7 days ago by FSpencer10
5.0 out of 5 stars Adam Grant explains precisely why it is better to give than to receive
This book has changed my life, and I rarely say that. By providing extensive evidence of the benefits of being a giver, Adam Grant explains precisely why it is better to give than... Read more
Published 7 days ago by Bruce D. Weinstein
5.0 out of 5 stars This book sheds new light on what it takes to ...
This book sheds new light on what it takes to be sucessful in business and in life. It is one of the few books I have read that validates and recognizes genorosity and... Read more
Published 15 days ago by Lindajoy Harris
3.0 out of 5 stars Three Stars
Came without a book cover
Published 17 days ago by Hillel Kramer
5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars
Very good book - insightful and teaches you a lot of lessons about life
Published 21 days ago by Naomi
5.0 out of 5 stars This is an excellent book, especially if you are a matcher or ...
This is an excellent book, especially if you are a matcher or taker. I really liked the practical lessons and stories, mixed in with the scientific studies to back up most of the... Read more
Published 22 days ago by FD261
5.0 out of 5 stars it will change the way you view success
Totally love Adam Grants book. it will change the way you view success.
I highly recommend it.
Published 23 days ago by Gry
4.0 out of 5 stars Four Stars
Interesting read. Helpful in understanding people's true motives
Published 24 days ago by Jeff Allison
Search Customer Reviews
Search these reviews only

More About the Author

Adam Grant is the youngest tenured professor and single highest-rated teacher at The Wharton School. His consulting and speaking clients include Google, the NFL, Johnson & Johnson, Pixar, Goldman Sachs, the World Economic Forum, the United Nations, and the U.S. Army and Navy.He has been honored as one of Malcolm Gladwell's favorite social science writers, one of BusinessWeek's favorite professors and one of the world's top 40 business professors under 40. He has appeared on the Today Show, Charlie Rose, and Diane Rehm, and was profiled in the New York Times magazine cover story, "Is giving the secret to getting ahead?" He holds a Ph.D. in organizational psychology from the University of Michigan and a B.A. from Harvard University. He is a former record-setting advertising director, junior Olympic springboard diver, and professional magician. For more details, see www.giveandtake.com

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?


Forums

Have something you'd like to share about this product?
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 


Search Customer Discussions
Search all Amazon discussions

Look for Similar Items by Category