Qty:1
  • List Price: $71.95
  • Save: $7.19 (10%)
Only 1 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Used: Very Good | Details
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: *WITHDRAWN LIBRARY COPY in VERY GOOD condition* with customary collection markings/stickers. SHIPS IMMEDIATELY WITH TRACKING PROVIDED.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Glass Ceilings and 100-Hour Couples: What the Opt-Out Phenomenon Can Teach Us about Work and Family Hardcover – October 15, 2009


See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$64.76
$42.06 $1.84
Take%20an%20Extra%2030%25%20Off%20Any%20Book

Special Offers and Product Promotions

  • Take an Extra 30% Off Any Book: Use promo code HOLIDAY30 at checkout to get an extra 30% off any book for a limited time. Excludes Kindle eBooks and Audible Audiobooks. Restrictions apply. Learn more.


NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Year
Best Books of 2014
Looking for something great to read? Browse our editors' picks for 2014's Best Books of the Year in fiction, nonfiction, mysteries, children's books, and much more.

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 232 pages
  • Publisher: University of Georgia Press (October 15, 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0820331546
  • ISBN-13: 978-0820331546
  • Product Dimensions: 5.5 x 0.7 x 8.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 14.9 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,859,354 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Over the past 15 years, many highly educated, middle-class women have—whether by inclination or necessity—traded their 50-plus–hour workweeks and considerable paychecks to stay home with their children and enjoy a saner, less hectic life. Economist Moe and anthropologist Shandy, both of Macalester College, dispassionately dissect the statistics and motivations behind opting out to determine whether this recent, still narrow trend denotes a bellwether, a fin-de-siècle folly or just a blip on the cultural radar. The authors also demonstrate how these women differ from the 1950s housewife stereotype. Liberally used economic statistics describe financial sacrifices, potential marital shifts in power and ways to avoid the automatic social invisibility conferred on stay-at-home mothers, while well-placed anecdotes from study subjects weigh flexibility and quality of life for family members. There's no discussion of how recession-proof this trend will be, but this objective analysis provides a calmly informative, readable tool, useful for any couple considering children. (Oct.)
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Review

"Liberally used economic statistics describe financial sacrifices, potential marital shifts in power and ways to avoid the automatic social invisibility conferred on stay-at-home mothers, while well-placed anecdotes from study subjects weigh flexibility and quality of life for family members. . . .This objective analysis provides a calmly informative, readable tool, useful for any couple considering children."—Publishers Weekly


"An economist and an anthropologist teamed up to conduct hundreds of interviews for this insightful analysis of the ramifications of stepping off the career track to focus on motherhood. The authors bolster their conclusions with a dazzling (and sometimes daunting) collection of statistics as well as thorough end notes and an impressive bibliography. Their scholarship is balanced by numerous personal stories that elevate the study beyond the miasma of the mommy wars."—Booklist


"Glass Ceilings and 100-Hour Couples discusses the choices that college-educated women face in balancing family and career, with a particular focus on why a significant share of well-educated women elect to leave the labor market entirely. The book is well-written and engaging reading. It has a nice combination of data and stories, showing the barriers that women continue to face in trying to be both good parents and good employees. Anyone interested in women’s changing patterns of work/family choices will find this book worth reading."—Rebecca M. Blank, author of It Takes a Nation: A New Agenda for Fighting Poverty


"This insightful and wide-ranging analysis of the work-family choices of college-educated women in America will appeal to everyone who has tried (and inevitably failed) to be both the ideal worker and the perfect parent. The authors, an economist and an anthropologist, combine current research and in-depth interviews to examine the experiences of mothers who decide to 'opt out' of the hectic life of a two-career couple, and the cultural and economic forces that shape their choices."—Shelly Lundberg, Castor Professor of Economics, University of Washington


"This provocative book raises many questions but does not stoop to providing pat answers about how couples should manage the work-family balance." —Choice magazine


"Moe and Shandy have written a comprehensive account of the many reasons behind the 'opt-out revolution.' Their engaging presentation makes for a fascinating read—one that will be of interest to anyone who feels the disconnect between the current state of work/life balance in this country, and the possibilities that exist for something so much better."—Elrena Evans, coeditor of Mama, PhD: Women Write About Motherhood and Academic Life



Glass Ceilings and 100-Hour Couples is an important contribution to the literature. The book provides new insights into the labor force decisions of working mothers and will be of great use to any reader interested – academically or personally – in the debate surrounding work–life balance in the United States.”—Lucie Schmidt, Feminist Economics

Important Information

Ingredients
Example Ingredients

Directions
Example Directions

More About the Authors

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5 stars
5 star
4
4 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 4 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By J. Minor on November 2, 2009
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Do you feel crazy to have left your high-powered career once you had kids? This book helps explain why it felt necessary and lets you know that you're definitely not alone. I was nodding my head on every page as the authors discussed the challenge of finding high quality childcare and the guilt of insufficient "mama time". It was also thought provoking to consider the perils of divorce for stay-home moms who have limited their earnings power by getting off the fast track and the need for adequate disability and life insurance when your family's finances rely on just dad. Finally, the authors offer a few ideas about how to maintain your connections and skills so you can eventually re-enter the workforce and find that elusive work-family balance. This is a compelling book that I've recommended to all the moms in my playgroup and beyond. The book lets us know, we're in it together!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Emily on June 14, 2013
Format: Paperback
I have never wrote a review for a book before but I decided that I needed to write one for this because I am very passionate about the subject.

This is a really thought provoking and wonderful book- I find myself talking about its themes and recommending it to all of my friends. It is a bit academic and not a "popular press" type of read, but it was incredibly intersting and one of my favorite books I have read in a long time. I read chapters from this book in graduate school and after I finished my degree, I went back to read it from cover to cover.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Paperback
I am a 3rd year law student ready to make the jump into the professional world. I've always tried to figure out my plan, for after I have kids and understand how that part of my life will mesh with my professional career.

With those questions in mind, I've really enjoyed reading this book. It talks about the struggles for women (and men) in the world today. Do you give up your job to take care of the kids? Do you go part time? Can your family afford to live on one income? All sorts of questions and studies are discussed in this book about professional women (and men) and dealing with work-life balance. It talks about alternatives to just quitting your job after you have your first child, and little tricks to keep in mind while living in a profession dominated by men. It gives statistics on your potential earning capacity when you take up to 3 years off from your professional job, and explores the statistics of professional women who take time off and the difficulties in going back to the workplace. Of course it touches on things like discrimination in the workplace, unequal pay, and all those sorts of legal issues as well.

I'd highly suggest this book if you find yourself asking any of those questions! Sometimes, its nice to know you're not the only one asking questions like that, or struggling to determine how your future will work out professionally later on down the road!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Great book describing women in the work place as they move up the corporate ladder.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?