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Glass Houses

October 20, 1998 | Format: MP3

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Song Title
Time
Popularity Prime  
30
1
4:13
30
2
3:40
30
3
2:57
30
4
2:56
30
5
4:13
30
6
3:57
30
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3:00
30
8
3:24
30
9
3:46
30
10
2:43

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Product Details

  • Original Release Date: October 20, 1998
  • Release Date: October 20, 1998
  • Label: Columbia
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 34:49
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B00138KMTM
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (123 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #15,650 Paid in Albums (See Top 100 Paid in Albums)

Customer Reviews

Billy Joel Rocks!!!
John Baranyai
I decided to buy most of his albums after realizing how much I really enjoyed his songs.
Sam Bruning
Great music and lyrics.
peariver

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

20 of 20 people found the following review helpful By "tracylady" on May 19, 2001
Format: Audio CD
Sure, I am but a mere one year older than this album, and while people in my generation groove to the likes of all the Christinas, Britneys, NSyncs and Backstreets, I take a trip back 20 years to when singers actually wrote their songs and sang about what mattered most -- not what about would make a great video. Billy is a Rock and Roll genius, and of his 15 albums, this is the ONE I could not live without!
It has just enough of his hits on it ("You May Be Right," "It's Still Rock and Roll to Me," and "Don't Ask Me Why") for those who aren't fanatics. But, the core of the album (as with most of Billy's work) is the unreleased songs: "Sometimes a Fantasy," "All for Leyna," and "Sleeping with the Television On," plus the others. These are the songs that you fall in love with and listen to on repeat (or, at least I do.) They are "Glass Houses," and each is its own masterpiece written by the single best singer/songwriter of 3 consecutive decades.
Go ahead... Listen and fall in love. Nostalgia it isn't. Great music it is. The 80s feel to the music only adds to its meaning and makes you appreciate that an album 21 years old can become your favorite for the next 21 years.
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32 of 35 people found the following review helpful By John Stone on March 19, 2006
Format: Audio CD
This was my first album ever. I was in third grade. It was this, and Disco Duck, so, you can guess which one stood the test of time. The other album, Glass Houses, was great too! I was too young to understand why being a straight A student meant you thought too much, but, I knew that if you got bad grades, you were cool, and some day, I might have a white boy's afro, wear a leather member's only jacket, and throw a rock through my rich girlfriend's glass house. What do you want from me...I was eight years old when I first heard this album. Thanks to this album I conned my Grandparents into buying me a sax, and then a key board, and then a leather jacket, and, eventually, drums. So, thanks to Billy Joel's Glass Houses, my life would never, ever follow a linear path on the road most travelled. One thing that does stand out, other than the fact that this album still blows away every album I have bought since...the whole star spangled banner playing with the bars and tone sound leading into the song. No one these days will understand what that sound means, which makes it even better. When ever I listen to this album, it always reminds me of a simpler time when every house had one phone, no answering machine, no internet, and a TV with 3 channels on a dial that played the national anthem or star spangled banner as we all fell asleep in the living room....you know...when families all actually hung out with each other. Thank you Billy.
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22 of 24 people found the following review helpful By M. Casarino on June 11, 2003
Format: Audio CD
Billy's 1980 opus was such a huge hit that it's easy to forget how enduring his songs really are. "Glass Houses" was Billy's "rock" album, and while some weak production (an ongoing problem for Billy) cuts the edge, he focused on a simplicity in the songwriting that really served his voice well. "You May Be Right" is a calculated, if irresistable, first single, but the real standouts are the dark "All for Leyna" (in which he sort of warms up for "Laura" on "Nylon Curtain"), the wonderful "Sleeping With the Television On," and the delicate, gorgeously-structured "Through the Long Night."
Even the misfires are thoroughly entertaining. "Close to the Borderline" lacks the punch to fulfill its post-punk ambitions, and the lyrics are awfully dated, but it's still a delightful anguished-yuppie number, and a nice preview of the more powerful, if equally unsubtle, "Pressure." "C'Etait Toi" meanders a bit, and Billy gets bogged down in bad French, but it's a pop charmer.
Then there are the hits..."Sometimes a Fantasy," "Don't Ask Me Why," the almost novelty-hit "It's Still Rock and Roll to Me." They were all hits for a damn good reason...they have great hooks, Billy sings 'em like he means 'em, and they get better with every listen. Billy would hit his Beatlesque stride with "Nylon Curtain" and find a stronger rock sound with "Storm Front," but it's great to hear him playing with both format on "Glass Houses."
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Shannon on July 13, 2000
Format: Audio CD
I would consider this album to be some of Billy Joel's best work. I believe this was when Billy started focusing on harder and truer rock after the "folky" period (Cold Spring Harbor) and also the more "jazzy", lighter period- he had just released the very jazz-oriented 52nd Street the year before which won him a Best Album of the Year Grammy.
With Glass Houses he breaks into new territory- literally, it's the first thing you hear. The #1 "It's Still Rock and Roll to Me", "Sometimes a Fantasy" and "Close to the Borderline" display his more frequent use of electric guitars and heavier drums- great songs to play loud when you're stuck in traffic. Pay particular attention to the lyrics on "Rock and Roll"- I think those were the overwhelming reason why this song was #1. (Note also his use of "West Side!" on "Borderline".) "All For Leyna", a pathetically poignant song, (everyone has had a Leyna) employs a lot of extremely '80's synthesizer sounds- new wave, perhaps. "You May Be Right"- a favorite of mine and one of the biggest hits (next to "Rock and Roll") has fabulous lyrics, a catchy tune and this strangely familiar opening riff like something off of the Beatles' "Day Tripper". Like Mr. Joel says, "You might enjoy some madness for awhile"...
The mid-tempo songs and ballads don't fall short either. "Don't Ask Me Why"- I can guarantee that you will recognize the song the moment you hear it (but, uh, don't ask me why). It wasn't that big of a hit for its time (so I've heard) but the melody is absolutely contagious.
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