Prime Music
Qty:1
& FREE Shipping on orders over $35. Details
Only 1 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
+ $3.99 shipping
Used: Like New | Details
Sold by alovesupreme
Condition: Used: Like New
Comment: Brand New. Open But Never Played. FAST First Class Shipping. Ships TODAY!
Sell yours for a Gift Card
We'll buy it for up to $1.10
Learn More
Trade in now
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon

Image Unavailable

Image not available for
Color:
  • Glass: Symphony No. 6; Plutonian Ode
  • Sorry, this item is not available in
  • Image not available
  • To view this video download Flash Player
      

Glass: Symphony No. 6; Plutonian Ode Import


See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Listen Instantly with Prime Music Album
Other Formats & Versions Amazon Price New from Used from
Audio CD, Import, November 7, 2005
"Please retry"
$16.29
$11.19 $7.98
Includes FREE MP3 version of this album.
Provided by Amazon Digital Services, Inc. Terms and Conditions. Does not apply to gift orders.
Complete your purchase to save the MP3 version to your music library.

Listen to Samples and Buy MP3s

View the MP3 Album.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         

Samples
Song TitleArtist Time Price
listen  1. Movement IBruckner Orchester Linz/Lauren Flanigan20:51Album Only
listen  2. Movement IIBruckner Orchester Linz/Lauren Flanigan11:27Album Only
listen  3. Movement IIIBruckner Orchester Linz/Lauren Flanigan18:28Album Only


Frequently Bought Together

Glass: Symphony No. 6; Plutonian Ode + Glass: Symphony No.7 'Toltec' + Glass: Symphony No.9
Price for all three: $51.70

Buy the selected items together

Product Details

  • Performer: Lauren Flanigan, Aleen Ginsberg
  • Orchestra: Bruckner Orchester Linz
  • Conductor: Dennis Russell Davies
  • Composer: Philip Glass
  • Audio CD (November 7, 2005)
  • SPARS Code: DDD
  • Number of Discs: 2
  • Format: Import
  • Label: Orange Mountain Music
  • ASIN: B000BRF9T4
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (12 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #125,298 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Editorial Reviews

Customer Reviews

There is a real dramatic pathos to this music.
Karim Elmahmoudi
Right from Glass's dissonant opening measures that roll toward us like black storm clouds, we feel the dark power of the specter.
David B. Edmonston
Look, If God was looking down on earth right now...this would be his background music.
Angel A. Valadez

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Richard G. on March 8, 2006
Format: Audio CD
I first heard Symphony No.6 'Plutonian Ode' at its world premiere at Carnegie Hall with the American Composers orchestra conducted by Dennis Russell Davies.

As with many premieres, works are often under-rehearsed and/or suffer from a lack of experience with the piece. This is a general indictment I have toward a lot of new music.

However, this may have been the case with the performance, which I, in tern, held against the piece. Last November, at the same time as Orange Mountain Music's release of this album, I had another chance to hear this symphony. I was less than excited, but I WAS excited about hearing the piece with which is was programmed: the world premiere of Glass' Symphony No.8 for orchestra-this time with the Bruckner Orchester Linz performing.

This time around, I recognized Symphony No.6 as nothing less than a masterpiece. Not only has the piece grown with the artists, Davies and Flanigan, but the orchestra (which had know the piece for years now), embraced the music with virtuosity and a european sophistication which lends itself very well to this most american of composers.

It was really like a new world. Flanigan's word's have meaning...the transformation of Ginsberg's character undergoes a very sincere voyage to personal transformation in the face of something ugly in the world.

There have been mixed reactions to the second disc featuring Ginsberg's narration of the original poem. At the very least it lends different perspectives to each recording.

A real masterpiece. A true example of how Glass continues to amaze!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
10 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Marvin Cohodas on May 20, 2006
Format: Audio CD
I'm not surprised to see the love-it or hate-it polarity of these reviews. I come to Glass from opera and am thus not intimidated by the operatic quality of the work and the soprano voice. I also think it is important to compare the music with Ginsberg's text which is in itself fairly inaccessible without the footnotes Ginsberg provided in his publication. But the point is that Philip Glass has taken a kernel of meaning in the Ginsberg poem that has become more significant and compelling as time has passed, and then expanded it musically so that the meaning becomes infinitely more powerful, convincing, and moving. It is also unfair to insert the poem into western religious spheres as some reviewers (on Amazon and not) have done. Ginsberg was and Glass still is heavily involved in Tibetan Buddhism, the imagery of which becomes increasingly prominent as the poem develops. The soprano voice then makes particular sense as the vajra, translated as thunderbolt or diamond, that here cuts directly through to a certain truth.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By David B. Edmonston on February 23, 2007
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
In "Symphony No. 6, Plutonian Ode," Glass takes as his libretto the late Bohemian poem of that name by Allen Ginsberg. This is Ginsberg's outrageous "howl" against thermonuclear weapons, which he personifies as the specter of "plutonium" and forcefully confronts in the poem. Right from Glass's dissonant opening measures that roll toward us like black storm clouds, we feel the dark power of the specter. With level eye, this poem sees the horror of mankind's own creation of a powerful weapon against itself and addresses this specter eye-to-eye with a malediction, a curse, an incantation for its extinction. This poem is both pagan and prayerful, and the music fully engages its angry, impassioned, and even hopeful moods. With loud, staccato rhythms played against a powerful soprano voice--I hear an angry angel--the poet's visceral malediction is brought home on the evil specter:

"I call your name with hollow vowels, I psalm your Fate close by, my breath near deathless ever at your side

to spell your destiny. I set this verse prophetic on your mausoleum walls to seal you up Eternally with Diamond Truth! O doomed Plutonium."

Ginsberg paints the sweetness of life on earth, the "tranquil politic [populace]" under "blue sky transparent rising empty deep & spacious to a morning star" and juxtaposes this scene of innocence to the "Satanic [war] industries projected sudden with Five Hundred Billion Dollar Strength." Glass delivers these statements with characteristic luscious orchestral colors interspersed with jarring dissonance.

At the beginning of Movement III Glass gives the listener an instrumental reprieve that opens in the sweetest mood, using few instruments, simple repetitive melodies, and close harmonies in his signature minimalist style.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
36 of 49 people found the following review helpful By svf on February 15, 2006
Format: Audio CD
The works that Philip Glass has designated as his "symphonies" starting in 1992 are a real mixed bag: There are the quite effective "Glass meets Bowie and Eno" first (Low) and fourth (Heroes), the rather dull second, the fantastic third for strings only, and the sprawling pseudo-spiritual mess of the fifth (Choral.) [A seventh (Toltec) and eighth have also been composed but not yet recorded.]

Though it may sound like the name of a Star Trek episode, Plutonian Ode is actually the title of a 1978 poem by Allen Ginsberg and the inspiration for Philip Glass's sixth symphony. This isn't the first time Glass has worked with the late "poet laureate of the Beat generation" and his texts: there was also the disastrous Hydrogen Jukebox, and the rather nice (and short) Echorus.

It is a curious and undeniable phenomenon that the more "interesting" Glass's music gets, the less interesting it actually is. There is probably more harmonic and melodic content in the first ten minutes of his Symphony No. 6 than in the entire five hour duration of Einstein on the Beach, but it ends up sounding like second-rate Zemlinsky, third-rate Berg, or fourth-rate Philip Glass. Repetition, gradual process, static harmonies, churning rhythms -- these are the hallmark "minimalist" ingredients that make this music tick. The more Glass tinkers with this formula, the less effective the result. I suppose you could say the same thing about his fellow "former minimalists" Steve Reich and John Adams, but Glass's music seems to be most affected by the "more is less" paradox. (Actually, of the "big four" founding fathers of minimalism, only Terry Riley has really managed to develop an effective and compelling new compositional style, in my opinion... he desperately needs a new website, however...
Read more ›
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


Forums

There are no discussions about this product yet.
Be the first to discuss this product with the community.
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?


Look for Similar Items by Category