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172 of 207 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Like "A Midsummer Night's Dream"...For Better or Worse.
There's been quite a bit of truly justified criticism of "Glee"'s second season. I myself had to force myself to wait a few weeks after the airing of the "New York" finale to actually try to write a coherent review on this sophomore season. Bearing that in mind, let's take the route of this season's first episode and recap what was the first season of "Glee":...
Published on May 31, 2011 by Phoenix Child

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37 of 50 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Ups and (mostly) Downs of Season 2 (Spoilers)
Season One of Glee was amazing. It had humor, it had great songs, and the characters were one of a kind. I assumed that Glee would be able to continue it into Season Two, and in some ways it did. But for the most part, season two was a huge let down compared to the first.

Let's start off with the good things first.

-Naya Rivera's Santana Lopez. This...
Published on July 3, 2011 by Dom


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172 of 207 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Like "A Midsummer Night's Dream"...For Better or Worse., May 31, 2011
This review is from: Glee: Season 2 (DVD)
There's been quite a bit of truly justified criticism of "Glee"'s second season. I myself had to force myself to wait a few weeks after the airing of the "New York" finale to actually try to write a coherent review on this sophomore season. Bearing that in mind, let's take the route of this season's first episode and recap what was the first season of "Glee":

"Glee" tells the story of a tiny, bullied glee club (a show choir where the participants sing and dance to either pop or showtunes or both without actually performing a musical) and how both the power of music and a kind mentor who believes in them helps twelve misfits forge a family and strive to share how special they are with the world, no matter how much is stacked against them. Although it sounds like a strangely cheesy premise and an unlikely TV show, "Glee"'s madcap formula, amazing music performances, terrific acting, intriguing characters, and potently quotable one-line zingers launched it into the stratosphere and it quickly became an international sensation and success. Within these plot lines, "Glee" tackled the sensitive issue of teen pregnancy (and how religion can impact that issue) wonderfully, along with showcasing the struggles of teenagers with body issues, the confusing adolescent world of sexuality, popularity, friendship, family, loyalty, bullying and peer pressure. Although there were a few misses in the first season, overall the season itself was one of the brightest and freshest new shows around, and it won several awards for it as well.

There's the rub, however: "Glee" is handled by three showrunners (Ryan Murphy, Brad Falchuk, and Ian Brennan), all of whom apparently decided that they could do no wrong. They flatly refused to bring in other writers or directors for season two, and since they were still selling massive amounts of music from the show and getting millions of views from their devoted audience of "gleeks", every single thing that was wrong about season one got blown out of proportion in season two, while everything that was right fairly faded to the background. The result? Season two of "Glee" started off strongly but by the second half meandered into sloppily handled plotlines that were often began and concluded in the space of one episode, characters acting severely out of character just for the sake of an episode's "theme", "theme of the week" episodes that were no longer touching or interesting but instead cheesy PSA-type episodes, bloated importance of guest stars, and a season finale that failed in every way that season one's finale succeeded.

Where on earth did "Glee" go so wrong? Season two's worst mistake was the characters acting out of character as "Glee" committed the worst mistake that any sophomore effort of a creative work, be it a film, television show or novel, can make: it completely erased any and all character development from the first season and started the characters off fresh. Rachel Berry, the club's star, who learnt the mistakes of her selfishness and made friends and learned how to lead a team in season one? Back to being a self-centered and often downright mean diva who stepped on each of her teammates to get what she wanted. Finn Hudson, the loveable popular dummy with a heart of gold who learned how to be a star and effectively lead the glee club and also learned that popularity was meaningless because he liked the glee club losers better than the popular football jerks? Right back to being a selfish, obsessed-with-being popular jerk to all of his friends.

However, the two characters this affected the worst? Firstly, Mr. Schuester. Mr. Schue was once the teacher everyone wished they could have: he put his students above everything, he pushed them, he motivated them, he guided them to being the best that they could be. Season two saw our once-beloved Schue essentially hitting a midlife crisis, using his glee club as an excuse to try to get closer to his now-unavailable crush Emma Pillsbury the guidance counselor, acting like a spoiled brat, and continually believing himself better than what he was. The second character was, of course, Quinn Fabray. Quinn began as the pretty and mean popular girl who became pregnant and became part of the heart of season one as she made true friends amongst the glee club, learned the value of family, and overcame her own meanness when the club rallied around her during the pregnancy issue. Season two saw absolutely no mention of her being pregnant anywhere ever. She inexplicably broke up with Puck (no explanation was ever given) and rejoined the Cheerios because she suddenly (like Finn) needed to be popular again. Although some of this damage was repaired by her new boyfriend Sam (newcomer Chord Overstreet), that repair was itself destroyed even worse later on. I won't even mention the destruction of Sue Sylvester, who transformed into a meaningless, cartoonish villain who was rarely even funny by the end and required a brutal character death just to reign her back in.

Despite all of this, however, season two began on a strong note (with the exception of the hot mess that was the "Britney/Brittany" Britney Spears tribute episode; despite some truly hilarious one-liners courtesy of Brittany (Heather Morris), this was likely one of the worst episodes of "Glee" to ever air) as it took a central theme: bullying and its impacts. Openly gay Kurt (masterfully played by Chris Colfer) took center stage as the school's relentlessly homophobic popular crowd was highlighted, leading to the explosive "Never Been Kissed" episode. Rachel's newfound (or oldfound, as the case may be) selfishness led to other glee club members to fight for their chance to shine and wounded the glee club badly when her bullying led to new student Sunshine Corozon (a criminally underused Charice) defecting to New Directions' mortal enemies Vocal Adrenaline, and Schuester's selfish and out of character behavior led to his kids whole-heartedly choosing hilarious new substitute Holly Holiday (wonderfully played by Gwenyth Paltrow) over him, and Santana's mean insistence on hiding from her feelings by attacking other people blew up spectacularly in her face.

In fact, despite two truly terrible episodes ("Britney/Brittany" and the wretchedly badly done "Rocky Horror Glee Show"), season two was off to a wonderful note, until the hiatus. When "Glee" returned after its touching Christmas episode, however, to the spectacularly overwrought Superbowl episode, things began going downhill fast, and they stayed that way for the rest of the season with a few notable exceptions. The biggest mistakes?

1) Rachel and Finn's Story: While I myself am not a "Finnchel" shipper (in "Glee", the portmanteaus of the couples are so important an episode was named after one), what was done to their relationship was criminally bad writing. Rachel wanted revenge on Finn for something he had done and so kissed his friend Puck. Finn broke up with Rachel and refused to forgive her for cheating on him...while he convinced Quinn to cheat on her boyfriend with him. Finn then went on to string both Rachel and Quinn along by emotionally cheating on Quinn with Rachel, then dumping Quinn out of the blue to return to Rachel. None of it made sense.

2) Quinn's further character murder. See above.

3) Kurt's storyline. What began as a heartwrenching display of how bullying gone too far can have devastating consequences quickly turned mind-numbing. While not to give away too many spoilers, Kurt was physically, emotionally, and verbally abused, which escalated into something like sexual assault and physical intimidation, before his life was threatened, causing him to leave the school for a different school with a no-bullying policy. Despite the wonderful plotline of Blaine Anderson (newcomer Darren Criss), Kurt rapidly reverts back to his selfish season one "bitch" persona from the first few episodes, then under one flimsy excuse switches right back to McKinley and goes back to being bullied, essentially rendering his entire plotline meaningless, and then goes on to remark "It's been a good year for Kurt Hummel" at the end of the season. Did I mention his father randomly had a heart attack and almost died in one of the season's better episodes? Really, writers?

4) The finale. The finale (it bears repeating). As I've said, season one's finale was wonderful. Season two's finale was essentially one giant episode centered around Finn and Rachel -- which in itself wouldn't have been so bad, except for it was wrapped up very badly -- while giving us some bad music, a wasted appearance by Jonathan Groff as Jesse St. James, and absolutely no resolution for any of the characters, particularly Kurt or his chief tormentor Karofsky. The ending was predictable and somewhat dim, and was generally an uneven end to an uneven season.

5) The self-contained episodes: NO MORE PSA episodes, please. Deal with an issue for teenagers over a two-episode arc where the lesson is meaningful, like season one did. Also, the plotlines such as Blaine's sort-of-maybe bisexuality that were introduced in one episode and wrapped up a half an hour later were just sloppy and useless.

But what did season two do right?

1) When it was handled well, season two's episodes were wonderful. From the good parts of Kurt's storyline to the heartwrenching religion episode centered around Burt Hummel's heart attack, to a surprisingly impactful episode centered around sexuality, season two's good moments shone like diamonds.

2) New characters. The initial cast of "Glee" will graduate by the end of next season (or some of them at least). Rather than do something terrible like getting rid of all the old cast members and introducing new ones in one fell swoop, the integration of Sam and Lauren into the existing was well done. The introduction of Kurt's new boyfriend(!) Blaine was wonderfully well-handled and the a capella Warbler's group was a fresh voice to the music; in fact, Kurt and Blaine's relationship was the only one really handled well this season.

3) Original songs! "Glee" took a chance and came up with original songs, ranging from the silly ("Trouty Mouth", "My Cup") to the downright good and fun ("Hell to the No", "Loser Like Me", and the epic "Light Up the World"), to the emotional power ballads ("Get It Right"), to the very bad attempts at emotional power ballads ("Pretending").

4) Character journeys. While I have been disgruntled at some character developments, Santana and Brittany were heartbreaking to watch; when left alone from Finn Rachel became a truly sympathetic character; Sam and Blaine and Lauren were all wonderfully well-done; and despite its flaws the episode "Born This Way" dealt masterfully with the characters confronting their flaws and fears.

In the end, what can be said of season two? It failed to live up to season one, that much is obvious. But the writers are actually hiring a new team of staff writers, so clearly they are learning something. Ultimately, it was still an enjoyable season despite its flaws. If anything, season two was a lesson in itself -- no one and nothing is perfect. "Glee" has succeeded despite this to show that in its imperfections some of the characters became even more interesting. What's in store for season three? None of us are demanding a perfect show. But if some of the problems of this season can be learned from and the first season can be used as an example, we might get something truly remarkable.

One thing is certain: "Glee" certainly isn't going anywhere anytime soon, and despite all of its flaws we just can't stop believin'.
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12 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Teenage Dream, November 13, 2010
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WOW! Such a sensitive and timely representation of bullying and high school homosexuality goes way above my already very high expectations for this show. And the substance goes down smoothly when coated with musical numbers that make you want to get out of your seat to dance and sing along! I smell Emmy for Chris Colfer this season. Darren Criss (I think that's his name) absolutely lights up the screen as Kurt's new gay friend, and I predict this show will really be a springboard for him. I can't believe that FOX, the station with one of the most conservative news teams on TV, aired a program in which two men kissed! Why couldn't we have had television like this when I was growing up?!
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37 of 50 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Ups and (mostly) Downs of Season 2 (Spoilers), July 3, 2011
By 
This review is from: Glee: Season 2 (DVD)
Season One of Glee was amazing. It had humor, it had great songs, and the characters were one of a kind. I assumed that Glee would be able to continue it into Season Two, and in some ways it did. But for the most part, season two was a huge let down compared to the first.

Let's start off with the good things first.

-Naya Rivera's Santana Lopez. This was one of the best things of the season. Though she is in season one, she isn't really developed as she is in season 2. Rivera is phenomenal and delivers an Emmmy performance as the bitchy and misunderstood cheerleader who hates all her fellow Glee Club members, but has a soft spot for them at the same time. She kicks it into high gear especially in the second half of the season where the character struggles with her sexuality. Her performance in some ways rivals Jane Lynch's Sue Sylvester. She is truly awesome at it, and is this years MVP of the cast. If there is anything worth watching this season, it is her character.

-Jane Lynch. Nuff' said.

-New Characters. Glee brings in a bunch of new characters to mix things up. This includes Sam (Chord Overstreet), the new Glee Club member. He is funny, and is fresh air. There is also fan favorite Blaine (Darren Criss). A gay character brought in to connect with Kurt. There is also Dr. Carl, played by John Stamos brought into the Will and Emma conflict. Also including new football Coach Bieste (Dot Marie Jones), new Vocal Adrenaline memeber Sunshine (Charice), her coach Dustin Goosbly (Cheyenne Jackson) and substitute Holly Holiday, played by Gwyneth Paltrow.

-The singing and numbers have gotten bigger. Glee's second season features a wider selection of songs that for the most part are great. The cast has also gotten better especially Monteith. More solo's are spread out, so it is guaranteed no matter who your favorite character is, you will hear them sing. Songs from Michael Jackson, Amy Winehouse, Florence and The Machine, Jay-Z, Jason Mraz, Adele, TLC, The Zutons, Katy Perry, Lady Gaga, Bruno Mars, and many more are featured. Including episode tributes to Fleetwood Mac, Britney Spears, and The Rocky Horror Picture Show and Original Songs written by the show's writers in two episodes. The music this season will not disappoint.

-The Return of old characters. Characters from season 1 come back for season 2, including April Rhodes, (Kristen Chenowith), Jesse St. James (Jonathon Groff) Sandy Ryerson (Stephen Tobolowski), Burt Hummel (Mike O' Malley) Carol Hudson (Romy Rosmount). As for their classmates, there is Dave Karofsky, Lauren Zizes, Becky, Azimio, and Jewish nerd Jacob.

While those are some great things of the season, there are more bad things unfortunately.

- The Warblers. During the season, the character of Kurt transfers to Dalton Academy, an all boys school who compete against New Directions in Sectionals and Regionals. While at first this seems like a good idea, as it moves the show in a new direction, it eventually takes a turn for the worse. The show starts to feature the Warblers heavily and spends a huge amount of time on this choir, despite the show being about New Directions. Some people like the Warblers, but I put it in the bad column because it stole time from other characters, for Kurt who ends up transferring back to McKinley for just in time for Nationals.

-The Neglect of other Characters. Storylines for characters are certainly wasted this season. The roles of Mercades, (Amber Riley) Puck (Mark Saling), and Artie (Kevin McHale) are reduced this season compared to last. Tina (Jenna Ushkowitz), Mike (Harry Shum Jr.)only storyline is them being a couple and is only showcased in Audition, and Duets. Ushkowitz does perform some great solos, but is wasted. Even the adults have taken back seat. Terri (Jessalyn Gilsig) is drastically reduced to a mere 6 episodes of a 22 episode season and leaves the show as a series regular in episode 21. Will hardly has any storylines other than a romance with Holly.

-The Rachel/Finn/Quinn love traingle. The storyline takes up most of the second half of the season. To make it short, it is repetitive and the characters become way out of sync. It seems they learned nothing from last season's baby drama, and the audience suffers for it.

-Dropped and rushed storylines. This season, lots of storylines are formed but dropped an episode later. This makes the show inconsistent and frustrating. Some of the dropped storylines include Terri making Will jealous, Santana and Quinn's quest to become the Queen Bee, Santana pining over Finn, the Artie/Tina/Mike love triangle, Quinn getting her revenge for Finn's betrayal, Mercades getting a boyfriend, no aftermath of Quinn and Puck's baby, and many more.

-The show also became sort of an "After School Special" kind of show. The show tackles religion, sexuality, death, homelessness, and the season long bullying arc for the character Kurt. While it was ok at first, the show dealt with it more with emotion, rather than comdey, as it is a comedy show. Too much of a PSA announcement for my tastes.

-Lackluster Finale. The finale for Nationals is not that great as I expected, even though it is in New York. Everything was rushed, and the Original songs performed sound just like the ones from Regionals. The Fall finale "Special Education" is more of a season finale for the show than the actual season finale. It is one of those things you have to see for yourself.

Despite a leap in ratings and the show producing way more money, the heart of the show is just not there anymore, which we all know was during the original 13 episodes. If your a big fan of Glee like I am, I'm sure you will see more of the positives and hope season 3 will be much better, as it is the last season with the first generation's cast. But I'm still not sure. I'll give the season 3 stars, nothing more, nothing less.
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21 of 28 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Inspirational, July 12, 2011
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This review is from: Glee: Season 2 [Blu-ray] (Blu-ray)
Season 2 of Glee has earned a lot of heat, to say the least. Meandering plot lines, 'in your face' storytelling,characters being forgotten about. And yes, some of these things hold true. I am still patiently waiting for Tina to make a reappearance as a functioning human being. Yet, for all these criticisms, I believe the season 2 surpassed season 1, for a variety of reasons, some of these reasons being why the show was critiqued as well.
First, season 2 had some of the most fantastic songs ever featured on the show. From Quinn and Rachel's "I Feel Pretty/Unpretty" duet to Kurt's absolutely heart-breaking "I Wanna Hold Your Hand" to Santana's "Songbird", the original cast stepped up to the plate and delivered their best performances to date. And then we have new cast members adding to the mix...you guessed it...the incredible Darren Criss in his portrayal as Blaine and the astounding Warblers! Who can forget "Teenage Dream", and how it swept us all of our feet? To sum it up, the music this season was incredible.
Second, the 'in your face' message episodes. These episodes have been criticized for trying to push a message to strongly and obviously. However, I can assure you that this is the only way that the show's target audience- namely teenagers- are going to listen. For example, the episode that dealt exclusively with alcohol. I believe in every way that the episode was brilliant, because in the end the message it sent was 'Yeah, we know you kids are going to drink. It's a fact of life. But you need to be careful, and adults--please give your teenager the support system they need.' This episode actually reached teenagers that I know, and got them thinking harder than any lecture ever had.
And I have to devote an entire tirade to what season 2 has done for the LGBT community. Kurt's struggle, and the maturation of his friendship with Blaine into a healthy romantic relationship, has done wonders for struggling kids everywhere. To see a gay character not only out of the closet, but learning to deal with bullies and hate, and able to find love? Chris Colfer has done a fantastic, Emmy-worthy job of bringing this character to life and creating not a comic-relief, but an in-depth person with insecurities and flaws that make Kurt one of the most beloved characters on the show. Watching the struggle of two other kids, Santana and David Karofsky, in coming to terms with their own sexuality, is equally important because, unlike Kurt, neither of those two was even aware they were homosexual until this season. Watching how they dealt with the issue in drastically different ways was a wake-up call for so many, and we can only hope we get to watch these two develop further in season 3. But season 2 stands above season 1, in my biased opinion, simply for the amazing Chris Colfer. He is the most talented person on that show and it would be a crime to not showcase him, and a further crime to not use the power Glee has to not try to implement social change by giving people a glimpse of a child, learning how to live in a world that does not accept who he is, and show them how being gay is not, in fact, a crime. To watch one character endure so much, which I'm sad to say many people in the real world have endured all that and more, and then be able to look back and call it 'a pretty good year' just speaks volumes about the courage and hope needed to face everyday life, and that line may be one of the most touching moments of the show.
As for meandering plots, unfortunately I'm afraid the writers have put too much faith in their viewers. When one actually watches all the actors on the screen, how they react, how they look, then all those supposed plot holes disappear. Unlike other shows, Glee requires us to pay attention at all times, and then everything clicks into place. I have not yet met a plot hole that cannot easily be explained away by someone who was paying attention. Also, we must always remember that Glee is meant as a satire- a piece of art/literature/theater etc that uses exaggeration to try and implement change. Anyone expecting it to be realistic has missed the entire point of the show.
The one criticism I will agree on is that we did lose some characters. Tina is gone. She had no role past Duets episode. But however tired I might have been of the Quinn/Finn/Rachel love triangle, I thought Quinn's transition back to popularity obsessed teenager was unfortunately very realistic, judging from my own experiences. But I think we can all agree that Puck's character development this season was even more touching than season 1, and he has become one of my favorite characters.
All in all, I rate season 2 a firm five stars, because of what is has done to try to change things. A show that attempts to implement social change will forever be brilliant, and Glee has done so much for others, as well as myself, in giving hope, courage, and strength to be who you are. I am in debt to this show, and all the wonderful people who made it happen. It is an inspiration.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Glee plus Original Songs Equals AWESOME!, March 23, 2011
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This weeks Glee episode really moved and excited me with its positive message and sweet romance. It is good to see a show presenting teen relationships in a positive light without being in your face or preachy. It also impressed me with its original songs. All I have to say is it is about time. I hope this show will stick around for more than a few years. These characters have grown on me.
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16 of 22 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Growing pains in its second year., June 2, 2011
By 
Sean Curley (Charlottetown, PE, Canada) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Glee: Season 2 (DVD)
"Glee" had a phenomenally successful debut year, taking a high risk concept and turning it into a ratings smash hit and a major cultural event that straddled both the television and music industries. The twenty-two episodes of the show's second season is overall a mixed bag, with many of the show's strenghts continuing to be in evidence, and many of the show's weaknesses still present. There has been a tendency among some fans of the show to overly idealize the first season, in particular the first thirteen episodes, a tendency I would overall reject. I don't think overall that the second season represents a notable drop in quality from the first. However, the show's shakier aspects (particularly in terms of narrative and character continuity) have continued to be evident, and I think fans are increasingly demanding that the show improve in those respects. Some spoilers follow.

Whereas the first season was split into two halves that saw New Directions go to its Sectional and Regional competitions (which made the outcome of the latter contest rather obvious from a structural standpoint), this season has a three-way split: Sectionals (episode 9), Regionals (episode 16), and Nationals (episode 22), and announces from the start that the Nationals competition this year will be in New York City. This predetermines the outcome of the earlier contests, but that likewise wouldn't surprise anyone, given that the club's existence depends on their winning the first two contests anyway. However, the majority of the season is given over to two focuses: couples drama, and gay-related Issues plotlines.

Concerning the former, some of it is well-done (mostly the gay ones; see below), but in many instances it becomes extremely repetitive and trying on patience. This is particularly pronounced in the case of the show's supposed central coupling, Rachel (Lea Michele) and Finn (Cory Monteith). Originally they were supposed to be together all season, but instead they broke up a little less than halfway through and spent the rest of it orbiting each other; the writers dredged up last year's obstacles again (Quinn [Dianna Agron], in an excruciatingly illogical plot, and Jesse [Jonathan Groff]), and their final reconciliation just spotlights how little their stories had advanced in a year. They more or less redo the first year's finale in the second. And the back half of the season does neither character any favours: Finn, who was cheated on by Quinn last year and broke up with Rachel over an incident of cheating, then persuades Quinn to cheat on Sam with him; this gigantic hypocrisy goes unremarked on by all; Rachel, meanwhile, becomes a pathetic hanger-on. If these characters are going to be together, then let them be together and develop their stories; it is no coincidence that easily the best Finn/Rachel storyline of the season is in "Duets", them working together to achieve a common goal. Various other romantic couplings occur, such as Tina/Mike [Jenna Ushkowitz/Harry Shum, Jr.], which is more or less ignored from the moment it begins; and Puck/Lauren [Mark Salling/Ashley Fink], which is a surprisingly successful comic courtship.

Then there are the gay stories. "Glee" attracted some controversy in Year Two from people who thought it was "too gay", an idea I categorically reject; given the paucity of gay representation on TV (though that's improving), the idea that one of America's major teen-oriented TV shows would embrace gay issues is laudable in the extreme. This complaint, I think, is partly a manifestation of a more valid complaint: that the writers don't give the straight characters the same care and attention that they do to the gay ones. Particularly with Kurt (Chris Colfer), the only character who is allowed a major season-long storyline and a genuine parental presence (Mike O'Malley as Burt); there's an obvious gulf between the quality of the material here. Kurt's search for a boyfriend (who arrives in the form of Blaine Anderson, played by Darren Criss) is a reasonably well-done story. Criss is an energetic addition to the cast. More problematic is the gay bullying storyline, which greatly confuses the issue by ultimately becoming about redeeming a closeted gay kid who bullies (and who is consequently more or less let off scot-free for his behaviour). There's also a pronounced double-standard between the now-serious treatment of Kurt's bullying and the farcical depiction of the bullying of everyone else - ammunition for people who think the show is slanted in Kurt's favour. Also in the gay front, pleasingly, the show finally stops pretending that Santana (Naya Rivera) and Brittany (Heather Morris) are straight, and in the second half of the season they take centre-stage more and more; and this well-executed story carries quite a bit of the latter half of the year, making great use of two of the show's best talents.

Acting-wise, this is probably Colfer's season; I wouldn't be at all surprised if he wins the Emmy for his contributions here. Rivera, as Santana, is close behind; finally given the chance to play Santana as more than just a bitchy mean girl, she is astonishingly poignant. The "Landslide" and locker confession scenes in episode 15 are truly amazing pieces of acting, and, in a just world, would also put Rivera in major awards contention (though she'll likely be blocked by co-star Jane Lynch as the show's nominee in the supporting actress field). Lynch, meanwhile, suffers greatly in comparison with season one; Sue is increasingly irrelevant to the show, and it's emblematic of this that a number of the season's best episodes ("Duets", "Silly Love Songs", "Born This Way") don't include here at all. Heather Morris, like Rivera, gets an expanded role, and, though she has some shaky bits, eventually proves to be surprisingly credible as a dramatic actress as well as a comedienne. Lea Michele, Cory Monteith, and Matthew Morrison (Mr. Schuester) continue to do good work, but they're underserved by their material this year.

Superb music, vibrant characters, and writing that is capable of being very affecting; at the same time, paired with shaky narratives and sometimes ill-judged stories. "Glee" continues to be a good show that is just shy of being truly great. With a larger writing staff being hired for next year, one hopes they can improve further, particularly is this is indeed the last time with the original cast.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Chris Colfer (Kurt) is Back Thankfully, May 2, 2011
I read an interview of the creator of this show at the start of the season. He said he was making no one a star and was going to regularly rotate kids out of the show and accent new characters. This might make sense if he hadn't chosen to use one of the real break out stars, Chris Colfer, who plays the gay teen Kurt in the Glee Club. He has not been totally gone but he has been marginalized for a really long time. On this episode he returns to his rightful high school and pretty much stars in the episode.

What an enormous difference it made to the show. I had steadily been losing interest in the show but my interest really came right back up the moment he returned front and center. I wrongly thought that Jane Lynch, my other favorite, would be enough to sustain my interest but not so. Much as I loved Gwyneth Paltrow in her first appearance on this show, I was heartily sick of her by her last appearance and was really eager to get back to the show I used to love. I have also really missed seeing Kristin Chenowith this season. She was just superb as April. But I will take getting Kurt back in his rightful place, thank you very much.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Glee, January 1, 2011
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This was a gift from my son at Amazon. I found the experience very enjoyable. Amazon gives great directions to download episodes of shows. I am an older person who is not very tech savvy but this was easy and the quality of the picture on my computer screen was excellent. I will be getting episodes of other shows I missed. I enjoyed Britney/Brittany, but it wasn't one of my favorite episodes. I don't care for Britney all that much, but the Glee cast did an excellent job.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Made me sit up and shout for joy!!!, December 24, 2010
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This has to be my favorite all time Glee episode! I loved this show, and was quite impressed with the "Teenage Dream" song. That was awesome! I recommend purchasing this episode, if you don't plan to buy the whole season! Just a great, great show!!!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Star Power-Gwyneth Pulls Out All The Stops, November 18, 2010
Put an Oscar winning actress who can also sing and dance on GLEE and you have the best episode of the show to date. First, she brings a completely wonderful character to life, a substitute teacher who can only play roles in teaching for brief periods of time. She becomes whatever the class needs for say thirty days and brings them completely to life. However, she can't sustain it. Then there are her musical performances. She absolutely holds her own singing and dancing with these Glee stars. Then, as if this episode couldn't get any better, they do numbers from SINGING IN THE RAIN, including the two classics from that film. Matthew Morrison does an incredible restaging of the very physical Donald O'Connor number and entire the ensemble does Gene Kelly's rain stomping number with the umbrellas and water. If they could bring Paltrow back again, it would be heavenly. She is absolutely fabulous here.
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Glee: Season 2 [Blu-ray]
Glee: Season 2 [Blu-ray] by Cory Monteith (Blu-ray - 2011)
$69.99 $22.50
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