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23 of 26 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Great addition for HDSLR rig
Looking to give more fluid movement to your videos? I definitely like this if you are shooting on an HDSLR setup like the Canon/Nikon/Panasonic/Sony DSLRs that are real popular in video right now.

For a video example (and since Amazon won't allow external links), simply click on my profile, click on my website, go to the VIDEO dropdown, click on BABY VIDEOS,...
Published on July 5, 2011 by matt wolfe [cc]

versus
3.0 out of 5 stars Three Stars
kinda hard to figure out how to really make it work. But i think it takes some practice...
Published 14 days ago by Arthur A.


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23 of 26 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Great addition for HDSLR rig, July 5, 2011
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Glidecam HD-2000 Hand-Held Stabilizer (Electronics)
Looking to give more fluid movement to your videos? I definitely like this if you are shooting on an HDSLR setup like the Canon/Nikon/Panasonic/Sony DSLRs that are real popular in video right now.

For a video example (and since Amazon won't allow external links), simply click on my profile, click on my website, go to the VIDEO dropdown, click on BABY VIDEOS, and look for the video BABY LIAM. It was shot with this Glidecam 2000, the Canon EOS 7D 18 MP CMOS Digital SLR Camera with 3-inch LCD (Body Only), and the Canon EF-S 17-55mm f/2.8 IS USM Lens for Canon DSLR Cameras.

Obviously if you are using a setup like this, focus control is an issue - to which I simply recommend setting your lens to focus on infinity to give you the longest focal field achievable with your lens, and step back away from the subject. If that is not possible, at least get a lens with a large focus ring and plan out your shot BEFORE you press record.

But for the Glidecam 2000. As with every review, you must consider management of expectations. Once you see a product in relation to what else is out there and what else costs whatever, then you can really see where the product exists.

CONS:
-You have to readjust weight if you add or take parts off your rig, such as changing lenses, adding or removing an eternal mic, etc. This can be time-consuming.
-Is not the most stable
-It feels awkward and requires some getting used to before you can pull off what it is intended for
-Is a work-out on your wrist and arm if you are doing this for a LONG time
-Approximately $500 to spend may seem like a lot
-Focus control is a problem since both of your hands are on the stabilizer

PROS:
+More fluid movement than handheld - YOU SHOULD NEVER HAVE ANYTHING HANDHELD ANYWAY
+Increases perception of value of your services if you are in the video business
+On the fly spins and pans is great for any fast-paced video you are trying to create
+Price is more than cheap if you know how much the film camera stabilizers are

Construction
*4 stars (would be 5 except that the quick release plate, with the Canon 7D anyway, has to be unscrewed to access the battery. Which means you need another adaptor set like the Manfrotto 323 RC2 Rapid Connect Adapter with 200PL-14 Quick Release Plate - Replaces 3299 (Black))

Functionality
*4 stars - a definite upgrade from handheld

Price
*3.5 stars - appears to cost a lot, but in reality it doesn't

Total:
*4 stars

I recommend this product for consumer level and mild prosumer level use. (The ratings are based on these expectations.)

Cheers.
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Easiest 5 stars ever., January 21, 2014
By 
Vdub (Saratoga Springs, UT, USA) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
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This review is from: Glidecam HD-2000 Hand-Held Stabilizer (Electronics)
I researched and thought very hard about which stabilizer to invest in. I was very close to getting the Opteka for a significantly lower price, but what always seems to happen is I quickly outgrow it and end up buying the real deal anyway and spending more than if I had just bought what I really wanted to begin with. Well the Glidecam definitely IS the real deal.

*Setup*
Initial setup does take a bit of time. If you don't know what you're doing and need to follow along with the instructions, it might take about 15 minutes to put together, not including balance fine-tuning. But the bulk of the time you will spend will be in balancing it. You mainly just need to screw together a few metal parts, and mount the "quick release" plate to your camera. Not too bad.

*Balancing*
This is the tricky part that you'll really need to practice on. The first time I balanced it, I just put all 10 weights (5 on each end) on the Glidecam and started playing with it, I was too excited to properly balance it. I suppose overweighting is better than underweighting, but it was much harder to control smoothly with overweighting, even though I was already noticing a massive improvement of my wide-angle motion shots. I then went back to properly re-balance it. I actually ended up needing 2 weights (1 on each end) to get that perfect floaty feel.

Once you are in the ball park of how much weight you need, the easiest way to fine-tune it is to adjust the length of the vertical bar. Even the tiniest adjustments will cause very noticeable changes in control. If you just lengthen the bar by a few millimeters, it gives lowers the center of gravity ever so slightly, which is what I needed to do to get my vertical balancing perfect. You will also need to play with the knobs on the top mounting section. There is a metal plate in there you can move forward/back/left/right to perfect the balance. I'm using a Canon 5D Mk II and a 60D. Both of them needed to be adjusted to the left a bit since their center of gravity leans right (due to heavier components like the battery and off-center lens mounts on that side). With heavier lenses like my 24-70 f/2.8L, I also need to pull back the positioning on the plate, since those will put so much weight in the front.

In any case, I highly recommend watching a few balancing videos on youtube and get a few different perspectives on the ways to balance your Glidecam. If you can't get the balancing down, you'll never realize this product's full potential.

*Construction*
This thing is pure quality. Nearly 100% of it is solid metal, and I appreciate that it is made in the USA unlike nearly everything else I've ever bought from amazon. When using it, I never feel any wobbliness or lose bolts or any other weirdness. You can simply feel the quality just holding it.

*Use*
Of course, balancing is the most important part, but assuming you are done with that, let's talk about actually using this. First of all, you'll want to go around your home or a park or something and just practice. A lot. You'll look silly but it's the only way to get down the technique. I had my wife help me as the subject, and I tried a lot of scenes. Such as, following behind her while walking, leading her while walking backwards, circling around her while trying to keep her smoothly centered in the frame at all times, etc. I'm still not amazing, but just from practicing this type of stuff for about a week I am much better. You'll need to learn how to effectively aim your shot while gliding. You can't simply use a 2nd hand to hold the vertical bar, as that will defeat the purpose of it and reintroduce shaking and wobbling you are trying to get rid of. I just use very gentle taps and twists to guide the shot, and let gravity and inertia do the rest. It's a lot harder than it sounds, but with practice, it starts to become second nature. I also recommend to try to keep your eye on the subject and general positioning of your lens and camera. If you try to keep your eyes glued to your camera's LCD screen the whole time, it actually makes it harder to keep the shot perfectly in frame.

*Glidecam HD-1000 vs. HD-2000 vs. HD-4000*
If you are deciding between different kinds or stabilizers, let me first assure you that you can't go wrong with these Glidecams. There are other, cheaper brands that do similar things, and if you're just a hobbyist with no intention of going big with your hobby in your lifetime, they may be the better option. But someday I'm hoping I can make cool enough videos to get some attention, for which I really feel like the real thing is worth the extra cash for. As far as the different models of Glidecams, it's pretty simple. I initially was leaning to the 4000 thinking it must be better because it costs more. But as I researched them, I pretty much realized they are all the same thing but with different intended sizes and weights of supported cameras. You don't get any extra features or bells & whistles with a 4000 than a 2000 or 1000. And based on the weight of my DSLR cameras and lenses, the 2000 seemed like a perfect middle ground. I would say nearly any size DSLR and a variety of lenses would pair well with the HD-2000. If you have a small DSLR and kit lens, like a T5i and an 18-55mm lens, you could probably even do fine with the HD-1000, though the 2000 would give you more room to grow. Certainly anything smaller like a typical consumer camcorder or point-and-shoot camera would do just fine with the 1000. Larger or commercial/professional cameras/camcorders may require a 4000. But for my 5D and variety of lenses, the 2000 was perfect.

*Summary*
If you are going for the best, this is it. You just need to decide if the cost is worth it to you, since the cheaper brands are still decent. For me, it was absolutely worth it. This thing is amazing. The first time I tripped over something while filming, then played back the video, is where I felt most vindicated in my purchase. I tripped over an 12" concrete wall and slipped over the other side before regaining my footing. Playing back the video, it barely even registered. It looked more like a brief, slight panning acceleration than an "I wasn't paying attention" trip. I usually try to balance out my positive reviews with at least a couple cons, but I am struggling to find any for this. Really the only negative is the cost. So you can at least trust that if it's within your budget, you will not be disappointed.
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11 of 13 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A very good video stabilizer for those with strong arms!, July 14, 2011
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Glidecam HD-2000 Hand-Held Stabilizer (Electronics)
I got the HD2000 for use in home/family videos so did not want a very expensive solution. The 2000 is a good size for my gripped 7D, rode SVM, and I use 10-22 and 24-105 lenses they balance nicely. I use a manfrotto 394 quick release plate, it is a sturdy plate that releases the camera quickly and easily because the lever is on the side. It also has a built in fluid level which aids in balancing. I bolted a stack of small washers to the glidecam baseplate so they push up against the 394 and hold it in place (very tightly too).

Setup with the glidecam is tricky there is no getting around it but the manual is well written and there are lots of videos on youtube. I recommend getting the rig close to the balancing point (weights), then sort the drop time (length of pole/weights), then fine tune the front/back and left/right balancing (with screws). I learnt to balance it by putting the removable pole from the glidecam forearm brace on the edge of a table or bench and prop it up to get the support pole vertical, then while holding the brace against the bench put the glidecam on so that it hangs freely then you can adjuct the front back and side to side screws with the other hand. Once you get the hang of what you are trying to achieve this method is very quick to balance. I make markings on the pole and baseplate for each lens but sometimes have to tweak slightly with each change. With this setup I have the weight pole ~3/4 extended, with 4 weights on each and the 394 attached to the middle hole 3rd from the back.

Using the glidecam is what will take most people some time to master, I still need lots more practice! Countering any back/forwards sway and accurate panning are the trickiest things to start with. I highly recommend getting the forearm brace. My wrist really starts feeling the weight after 10min (entire rig weighs ~5kg), and you really want to concentrate on shooting instead of how tired your wrist is getting! Most hobbyists wont want to spend thousands on a vest, but clearly thats what professionals will use.

The glidecam is not cheap and not everyone will like it but if you take the time and effort to learn how to use it the results are amazing!
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars MUST HAVE FOR DSLR, April 4, 2013
By 
AmericanJarhead "Johnny fubar" (New Britain, Connecticut USA) - See all my reviews
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Glidecam HD-2000 Hand-Held Stabilizer (Electronics)
I love my HD-2000. It's not terribly hard to use or setup (if you're a little anal it will certainly help). I'm a former professional photojournalist (stills) just now getting into video. I can't imagine not having this for even everyday family video. It's a must for anything beyond that is highly fluid situations. The quality and fit and finish are top shelf. One problem I did have was when mine arrived, the base plate, where you add the counterweights and move them in and out from the center, didn't have threading in one of the holes. This made it impossible to have perfect balance in that particular position. I didn't call or contact the seller about it, I emailed Glidecam in Massachusetts. I've come to expect marginal if not outright terrible customer service from most business these days. However, I was surprised by the quick response to my email inquiry, even thought it went to a general mailbox! I told them about the issue and they sent a new base plate immediately and didn't even ask me to ship the old one back. I thought I'd have to ship it to them so they could see it and then they'd send a new one. They gave me the impression that they really care about their customers and the product's reputation. Thanks Glidecam.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Works perfectly!, February 5, 2014
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This review is from: Glidecam HD-2000 Hand-Held Stabilizer (Electronics)
It takes some adjustment and practice, but it works just as described. It's also a good workout, but be sure to swap hands around or else one of your arms will look like Popeye's.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Very delicate balance, with amazing results, January 29, 2014
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This review is from: Glidecam HD-2000 Hand-Held Stabilizer (Electronics)
I'm starting this off by saying that while the Glidecam is more expensive than other systems, it's for a good reason. You're paying for better bearings, higher quality, and a versatile platform that will last for years.

Don't be mistaken by something like bearings. If they're low quality, movement in your hands may translate into the system, and the camera will be tough to keep pointed at your subject. I've yet to hear of a zero friction bearing, but these are fantastic. That's true for the whole stabilizer too. All of the parts feel strong, and I have no problem trusting that my camera is secure.

I started out using this with a Nikon D3200 which is on the very light side of the system weight, but I could've put a lighter camera on, and still balanced everything. My current camera is the D600, and that still only requires two or four of the 12 weight plates included, depending on the lens and accessories. If you do plan on using more weight than what I have, a vest or arm support may be a very good idea. I will also say that if you're using all of the plates, the next size up is probably the better system for you. There's an enormous amount of room to grow here, and that's a massive benefit for me, and many that I know as well.

The quick release plate, as many have said, is not quick. I put on a simple Manfrotto QR, and solved the problem, but it's entirely possible to connect right to the plate, it's mostly preference there. The screws to tighten down the adjustments are tough sometimes, but a quarter fits perfectly into slots cut into the nobs, so as long as you keep some spare change it's no problem.

One thing to note is that this is very sensitive. For me, if I change the position of the grip, the balance changes and needs to be dialed in again. Changing focus, inserting a memory card, or opening a plug cover can change the balance, but I see this as speaking to the parts being that high of a quality. Sorry to say it again, but bearings make a massive difference, I learned that the hard way.

If I'm completely honest, I would've bought a good shoulder rig before this, as I see more use there, but I'm still very happy I decided to pick up the Glidecam HD-2000. The images are amazingly smooth once you practice, and patience is key for balancing it, and getting those amazing shots.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great Steadycam for DSLR Video, January 24, 2014
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This review is from: Glidecam HD-2000 Hand-Held Stabilizer (Electronics)
Thus far, the Glidecam HD-2000 has really blown me away with how easy it was to assemble and balance. I'm shooting with a canon 7D as well as some pretty heavy lenses, and its holding up quite well, even with only 2 weights on the bottom. Compared to most steadycam rigs on which you would have to loosen the entire quick release just to balance, The glidecam cam has fine tuning dials that make it so much quicker. I had near perfect balance on this setup in around just around 10 minutes out of the box. As far as i'm concerned, it's worth every penny just because of how much time it saves you on set.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Get yer glide on, November 7, 2013
By 
Kastertroy (Las Vegas, NV USA) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Glidecam HD-2000 Hand-Held Stabilizer (Electronics)
Please don't let all the difficult setup hype deter you away from this unit. I too, like most people who buy these was really intimidated but honestly it only took me about 15 minutes to attain near perfect balance. Its really not that hard, you just have to understand the product and how it functions. I did a video tutorial on how to balance a 7D in 15 minutes on this little guy so if anyone is interested just search YouTube for "How To Balance A Glidecam HD-2000 & Canon 7D In 15 Minutes Or Less". It may be helpful in your decision to purchase or to help you balance you camera.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Glidecam HD2000 review, October 3, 2013
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This review is from: Glidecam HD-2000 Hand-Held Stabilizer (Electronics)
This is my first purchase of any kind of product to help with stabilization while recording video. This product is absolutely amazing. I was researching the difference between this and other products but was not able find out if there was a significant difference. I watched a few videos on youtube for proper setup, and once I got it set up and most importantly, learned the best angle for holding the handle (at 3 o'clock), its been absolutely amazing. I really like this product.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent Stabilizer for Canon 7D and T5i + Standard Zoom Lens, March 8, 2014
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This review is from: Glidecam HD-2000 Hand-Held Stabilizer (Electronics)
There are plenty of good reviews online for the HD-2000 so I'll only focus on the setup experience with Canon DSLRs.

Right out of the box the HD-2000 was very easy to assemble without requiring hand tool, just put some parts together rotate them and hand tighten. Since I'm using a quick-release adapter plate its 1/4 bolt required a screwdriver to tighten to the base plate but that was about the only actual tool needed.

Once assembly was completed making the necessary macro and micro adjustments to arrive at a 3-second "pendulum" swing took considerable time even after watching some very detailed YouTube how-to videos. The issue was the camera used was very close to the minimum weight requirement so eventually all the weight plates were removed and put back on one by one. The micro adjustments using the built-in screws are extremely sensitive so any change whatsoever from adding a washer for the adapter plate bolt to battery pack swap to LCD screen folding will make a huge difference and require additional adjustment thereafter. So after this initial learning curve for adjustments everything was great for extensive practice runs.

A few Q&A bullets that may help fellow Amazonians:
- IMHO the HD-2000 is ideal for "prosumer" DSLRs such as the Rebel, 60D, 7D...
- While the Glidecam is very light (not sure why some reviews state that it's heavy, try holding a Canon 7D + 70-200 mm IS + battery grip for 6 hours and trust me the HD-2000 is very light) the heavier the camera setup (body + lens + battery pack) the smoother the motion
- If you have several camera bodies then purchase additional base plates to cut down on adjustments
- Get a battery grip to avoid having to remove camera body from base plate just to swap out battery. Battery grips double the capacity so theoretically should double the run time to further lessen battery swaps.
- A quick adapter plate is highly recommended. (May not be necessary if you have a battery grip)

Glidecam HD-2000 Hand-Held Stabilizer
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Glidecam HD-2000 Hand-Held Stabilizer
$499.00 $459.00
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