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The Global Nomad's Guide to University Transition Paperback – June 1, 2010


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The Global Nomad's Guide to University Transition + Third Culture Kids: Growing Up Among Worlds, Revised Edition + Belonging Everywhere and Nowhere: Insights into Counseling the Globally Mobile
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 300 pages
  • Publisher: Summertime (June 1, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1904881211
  • ISBN-13: 978-1904881216
  • Product Dimensions: 6.1 x 9.2 x 0.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (13 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #758,314 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5 stars
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See all 13 customer reviews
I highly recommend this book to ALL high school aged TCK's AND their parents!
Rachel Clark
You might as well enable them to feel less like a freak during the process and open dialogue amongst his/her peers and yourself.
Natalie J. Sudborough
Looking back on my troubled college years, how much I wish I had had this book at that time!
E. Cho

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Greg Caldwell on August 1, 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
A Lewis & Clark College colleague discovered Tina Quick's book while attending the OACAC (Overseas Association for College Admission Counseling) conference this year. He loaned me the book for the weekend and I haven't given it back yet! I've ordered my own copy for the office. I love this book and feel that it is the most helpful resource for TCKs (Third Culture Kids) that I have ever read. While based on research, it is easy to read and very, very practical. TCKs will appreciate the real life experiences of their peers and will come away with good advice no matter where they open the book and start reading. After digesting the section on relationships, TCKs might actually understand why they initially have so much difficulty making US friends. This book gives students lots of good, sound, practical advice that they can use before and during their transition to university. Last week I sent an email to my new incoming first year TCKs (and their parents) suggesting that they buy the book and read it in the month before new student orientation begins. As a TCK herself and as a mother of three TCKs, Tina Quick knows her subject well and speaks with authority. But, she does so in a manner that students will enjoy.

Greg Caldwell
Associate Dean of Students and
Director of International Students and Scholars
Lewis & Clark College
Portland, Oregon
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Rebecca Grappo on June 12, 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Tina Quick's book is the book that has been missing for years from our library of books about raising and educating children overseas. In fact, it seems that "transition to college" is where all the help books and "owner's manuals" for parenting stop. However, transition to college for any student is a major life change. Couple that transition with the issues that a Third Culture Kid faces and it's no wonder that many of these young people have a very difficult time adjusting. I have been telling every one of the college-bound students I advise, their parents, and my professional college counseling colleagues about the importance of this book. And parents - if you can't get your own teen to read the book yet - read it yourself so that if he/she calls home frustrated or in tears, you'll be able to better support them!

Rebecca (Becky) Grappo, M.Ed.
Founder, RNG International Educational Consultants, LLC
Certified Educational Planner
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Lois Bushong on June 11, 2010
Format: Paperback
I wish this book was available when I, a Global Nomad, returned to my passport country and entered college! It fills an important niche that has been vacant for too long. I love Tina's style of writing for she writes clearly and gives wonderful examples for the Global Nomad making this transition. I had a difficult time putting down her book. She is most knowledgeable and has certainly done her research. The book is filled with interviews of Global Nomads and those who work or study them. I think Tina went the second mile with her writing as she ends each chapter with the key points of that chapter and where one might find more materials on that topic, etc. It is not a book filled with philosophy and research studies, but a most practical book that a university bound student can put into their backpack and understand what is going on within them. The chapter on hidden grief is the most important one in the entire book. It is the perfect companion book to David Pollock and Ruth VanReken's book "Third Culture Kids:Growing Up Among Worlds". In my role as a mental health counselor, this book will be high on my referral list to all Global Nomads and their parents.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By E. Cho on June 10, 2010
Format: Paperback
Looking back on my troubled college years, how much I wish I had had this book at that time! I was a TCK who grew up outside of my home counry, and went back to my home country for my undergraduate degree. The reverse culture shock that I felt during my university life back in my home country was so much stronger than culture shock from foreign soils. I was exposed to the toughest life experiences completely off-guard. This book provides a very easy-to-follow but practical advices to such (potentially) troubled souls. Therefore, this book has the potential to save many TCKs, their parents, and their friends from so many misunderstandings and troubles. I highly recommend this book as a must-read to all the college-year TCKs, their families, their friends, educators, counselors, and so on.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By dxb on January 26, 2011
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I bought this book for my college freshman, who is a Third Culture Kid/ Global Nomad as well as a child of a multi-cultural family. I thought it might be helpful for some of the transitional issues. He received the book yesterday and apparently stayed up way too late reading, without realizing the time. He said, "The book is actually really good." I thought that was worth sharing, especially for parents who are considering whether it would help their child.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Wonderful resource for international students and their parents. So down to earth and a keep by your bed for college.
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Format: Paperback
Reviewed by Katrin Volt for George Simons Intl, at diversophy.com

“I feel like a fish out of water.” Tina L Quick’s handbook provides practical advice and guidance for young third culture kids (TCKs) and global nomads moving to their passport countries for university studies. The author, a third culture kid herself, is an expert in the field and this professionalism shines through in the book. The Global Nomad’s Guide to University Transition deals with the issues third culture kids in particular face and guides them towards a smooth transition.

The book is filled with informative advice, tips and observations, which are brought to life with the authors’ personal stories as well as those from other third culture kids. There are also exercises that help process and think about the issues in more depth. Each chapter ends with “what you should know,“ an easy reference, though it may feel repetitive for some readers, and a list of further resources, which gives additional information on the topics covered in the chapter.

A sense of belonging everywhere and nowhere is how third culture kids usually identify their place in the world. The feelings of isolation, restlessness, not fitting in, their search for identity, etc. are what will face them in their transition. As Quick says, life is full of change. They have had very mobile lives in a cross-cultural world – the two realities of being a third culture kid. On the upside, such individuals have developed an array of skills, e.g. being skilful observers of and mediators between cultures. On the downside, they may develop feelings of loneliness and unresolved questions of identity.
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