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Globalization Unmasked: Imperialism in the 21st Century Paperback – July 1, 2001

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Editorial Reviews

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...protesters at future WTO meetings will wave well-thumbed copies. Choice
--This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

About the Author

James Petras is former Professor of Sociology at Binghamton University, New York.

Henry Veltmeyer is Professor of Sociology and International Studies at Saint Mary's University, Halifax, Nova Scotia.
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 208 pages
  • Publisher: Zed Books (July 1, 2001)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1856499391
  • ISBN-13: 978-1856499392
  • Product Dimensions: 6.1 x 0.6 x 9.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 9.1 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,062,937 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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16 of 18 people found the following review helpful By Douglas Doepke on April 13, 2005
Format: Hardcover
Despite the superficial review below, Globalism Unmasked is neither warmed-over cliche nor Third World chauvinism. The fact that some classic themes carry over to the New World Order, while some do not should surprise no one. Which do, and which don't, however, may. Those readers interested in situating Marxist analysis within the New World Order should find the text both stimulating and rewarding. In fact, "globalization", or its semantic equivalent, is on the lips of just about everyone, while the idea dominates trendy discourse. But the question remains: how is this concept being popularly understood and what are the facts surrounding its sudden emergence. The book's project is to shed some light on these crucial issues.

Clearly, globalization is being sold as an irresistable process, driven by new technologies that make an empire of global capital impossible to avoid. The practical upshot is that resistance should be understood as futile, no matter how negatively a person's life is being affected. The ideological value of this manuever should be obvious, while the value of its debunking should be even more so. Moreover, many on the left have bought into this thesis, rendering the book's counter-thesis a particularly important and timely one.

Behind the buzz-word, the authors insist, lies the old process of imperialism, or Euro-American exploitation. So the wine hasn't changed, only the semantic bottles. Given all the nonsense about an end of history, this is a contention worth considering, and it's the book's burden to defend the thesis. (How well it succeeds should be up to the reader to judge.) But at least, their analysis caused me to re-examine what's behind popular use.
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5 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Vahit Sametoglu on April 11, 2006
Format: Paperback
"Globalization" is deemed to be something very cool and new age. We hear people say things like "we live in a small village called the World and globalization what makes this happen". It all sounds very nice, fancy and cool!

But, do you think it is really cool for those who are "globalized"? The authors basically argue that globalization is some sort of new fancy name for imperialism with lighter rendition. People of the underdeveloped and developing countries should be very cautions as to the activities of some worldwide organizations IMF, World Bank etc.

One of the most eye-opening chapters of the book was the one about non-governmental organizations (NGO's). They argue that even though the majority of the administrators of these organizations are local people, they have, in general, very strong ties with those infamous worldwide organizations and powerful countries. They are paid by those institutions / countries in large sums and used as the tools of propaganda and promotion. These (relatively) poor countries essentially become more and more connected and dependent on the (seemingly) benefactor / benevolent countries.

This book carries a message to the people of underdeveloped and developing countries that they should stay away these NGO's and similar organizations as much as possible.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By J. Kang on April 19, 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This book helps you understand why wealthy capitalist nations are so passionate and eager to see other less developed countries to come and embrace free market economy. They lend money in forms of aid to the nations in need of financial support, and in return, force them to de-nationalize their resources, de-regulation of their industries so they are susceptible to foreign capitals, demand political allegiance, and to adopt economic policies that only benefit creditors in the end. At times, they go so far as to launch military attacks to physically destroy industries of other nations - for example, Ethiopian pharmaceutical industry and Guatemalan Fruit industry - so that they are forced to buy American products and ask them for financial support. A must-read.
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10 of 21 people found the following review helpful By Andy Blunden on May 31, 2003
Format: Paperback
I didn't get a lot out of this book. I imagine there are plenty of young people who don't know what imperialism is and don't know it's history, so there is a need for such material. But I don't know if this would be the best vehicle for explaining this. It was good to get some of the facts, financial data and so on, but these are doubtless available in many books.
Altogether, it was a bit like going to a Rod Quantock comedy show or a good singing of The Internationale, preferably in Spanish. It makes the Left feel better, but it doesn't actually address the issues or change anyone's mind, if they didn't already know they were right all along.
In 175 pages, there was the mention of a strike in Belgium, a general strike in France and a street demonstration in London, within lists of "Third World" movements, plus an observation that foreign employees of NGOs would be better to go back to their own country and fight their own employers, but otherwise, the only politics discussed was in the "Third World" - the "victims" of imperialism. The implication is that the workers of Europe and the US (and Australia) are going to be rescued by movement of landless peasants in Columbia, or wherever, or not at all.
Given that the whole issue of "globalisation" came into public consciousness in the West as a result of Seattle, i.e., a movement by US citizens, not as a cheer squad for Third World revolutions, but on their own behalf, and not against the state, but against corporations, it is not really good enough to say: "Nothing has changed (except "quantitatively"), this is the same old imperialism that we all had demos against in the '60s and '70s. It's all a lot of globaloney! Regis Debray was right all along.
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