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Globalization: A Very Short Introduction (Very Short Introductions) Paperback – June 19, 2003

ISBN-13: 978-0192803597 ISBN-10: 019280359X

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Product Details

  • Series: Very Short Introductions (Book 86)
  • Paperback: 168 pages
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press (June 19, 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 019280359X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0192803597
  • Product Dimensions: 6.9 x 6.5 x 0.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 5.6 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (15 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #650,701 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author


Manfred B. Steger is Associate Professor Politics and Government at Illinois State University and Affiliate Faculty Member at the Globalization Research Center of the University of Hawai'i-Manoa. His books include Globalism: The New Market Ideology.

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Customer Reviews

It's too bad, really.
J. Bennett
This truly is a dazzling brief introduction to a subject that could not be covered even by a very long book.
Robert Moore
Overall, an excellent introduction to the various facets of one of the most important issues of our time.
Amazon customer

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

57 of 59 people found the following review helpful By Robert Moore HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on August 19, 2004
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This truly is a dazzling brief introduction to a subject that could not be covered even by a very long book. As Steger points out, the fact of globalization is the predominant issue of our time. Far too man, as he points out, tend to treat the subject in monolithic or simplistic fashion, focusing on merely one aspect of globalization, and assuming that that aspect defines all of globalization. Anyone familiar with Thomas Friedman's THE LEXUS AND THE OLIVE TREE (who is frequently described as a "hyper globalizer") will recognize one such very narrow approach. Despite his brief space, Steger wants to do justice to the complexity of the subject. For the past decade, most writers on globalization have focused on economic globalization, but Steger emphasizes that the process has political, economic, religious, cultural, environmental, and ideological conditions.

Many people who tackle the question of globalization seem to want to know, "Is this a good or bad thing?" Steger is anxious to emphasize that this does not admit of an easy answer. Clearly, the massive increase of economic inequality--which occurs both on international and national levels, e.g., wealth has more and more been concentrated in the industrial countries of the northern hemisphere, and within those countries, more and more in the hands of a small economic corporate and investing elite--is not a good thing, but that is not the only aspect of globalization. Steger seems to suggest that there are both significant advantages and some lamentable dangers in globalization.

The one aspect of globalization concerning which Steger is clearly and rightfully concerned is the promotion of globalization in the ideological terms of the Neoliberal project of promoting free markets over all other concerns.
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18 of 18 people found the following review helpful By Amazon customer on June 3, 2006
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Steger begins by defining the term "globalization": A "set of processes" (not a "condition") towards greater interdependence and integration among the various cultures of the world. He makes a point to emphasize that economics is only ONE aspect of globalization: there are also political, cultural and ideological aspects. Moreover, he dedicates one chapter to showing that globalization is by no means a NEW phenomenon: cultural exchanges can be traced back to the prehistoric period.

I found the chapter on the economic aspects of globalization (chapter 3) very useful. It explains the history and role of the IMF, WTO and the World Bank in the global economy. It also discusses the West's transition from "controlled economies" to "free market capitalism." Arguing that globalization is an uneven process, the author shows how it is having very different effects on the various regions of the world. This gives us a clear vision of some of the negative impacts of the new world economy, such as a larger gap between rich and poor nations. His realistic view of globalization is a nice antidote to the cheerleading of hyperglobalizers like Thomas Friedman.

The chapter on opposition to globalization (chapter 7) does an excellent job of explaining challenges that are coming from both the right and the left. The particularist protectionists (on the right) feel threatened by multiculturalism because they want to maintain a sort of cultural purity. This often leads to their rallying against immigration and appealing to nationalism. However, like the left, they also criticize the power of the corporate elite and the negative effects globalization is having on the average domestic worker (i.e., jobs going overseas, lower wages). In the US, Pat Buchanan is a good example of this view.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Sussman on November 28, 2013
Format: Paperback
This rather slim addition carries a `weighty topic' rather well. The author Mr Steger is an eminent Professor of Global Studies at Melbourne Institute of Technology and he talks about how the term came into being. As Mr Steger comments, a growing number of academics and political, commentators invoked the term to describe a number of changing parameters in economics ideological, ecological, cultural and political frameworks. These aspects, which in recent decades have been seen more than from the perspective of one nation's viewpoint but rather as a global concern/view. What we get in this, well thought-out and, readable book is Mr Manfred Steger's multifaceted development encapsulating global, regional, and local aspects of social life, in addition to explaining the various magnitudes of globalization. The book is neatly divided into sections explain one theme and or the other, and yes there is a plethora of `jargon' in the mix, so keeping a dictionary to hand maybe a good idea. However, what comes to the fore, in the later part of the book, is Steger's premise that `Globalisation' is not necessarily a modern age phenomenon but rather as old as the ability human beings have had for putting their thoughts into the `written word'. For me this was both a thought provoking and somewhat enlightening read.
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9 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Dr. Ronald A. Reminick on July 28, 2005
Format: Paperback
This little book is a concise and sophisticated and very readable account of a very significant process in the world today. It objectively examines the positive and negative consequences of the globalization process and intelligently evaluates it's role in world development. He also includes some very interesting statistics on a variety of economic statuses of particular countries and corporations.
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