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8 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A new foundation for understanding modern Islam's sentiments and radicalism
Globalized Islam: The Search for a new Ummah pinpoints growing Islam militancy not abroad but in the West, arguing that the revival of Islam among Muslims over the last few decades is more a force of the pressures of globalization than a reaction to the West. In moving beyond the traditional, more common ' East versus West' argument, GLOBALIZED ISLAM provides a new...
Published on December 10, 2006 by Midwest Book Review

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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Intense Read
Roy certainly had an interesting angle when deciding to pen this book, which often makes for some of the most insightful and thought-provoking reads. His ideas on how globalization has affected Islam and his discussion on how Islam in itself should be held separate from what the general public knows as "radical Islam" was a stimulating counter to what is so often heard in...
Published on April 16, 2012 by Danielle


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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Intense Read, April 16, 2012
This review is from: Globalized Islam: The Search for a New Ummah (CERI Series in Comparative Politics and International Studies) (Paperback)
Roy certainly had an interesting angle when deciding to pen this book, which often makes for some of the most insightful and thought-provoking reads. His ideas on how globalization has affected Islam and his discussion on how Islam in itself should be held separate from what the general public knows as "radical Islam" was a stimulating counter to what is so often heard in the media today.

However, I believed that as Roy did a decent job of supporting his ideas, I do not think that he did the best job of debunking the common belief that is already prevalently circulating the global community. Roy discussed the involvement of non-traditional Islamists, or jihadists, but I do not believe that he sufficiently contradicted the idea of purist Islam as also playing a role in terrorist activity (not saying that this is my personal argument, but simply reviewing his work).

On an ending note, I think that Roy's book was a thoroughly intense read. It required my full attention from cover to cover, and being so-- it made it very easy to miss information if I was not paying complete attention to what I was reading. This resulted in having to re-read much of the book, just to get a full grasp on his argument.
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8 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A new foundation for understanding modern Islam's sentiments and radicalism, December 10, 2006
This review is from: Globalized Islam: The Search for a New Ummah (CERI Series in Comparative Politics and International Studies) (Paperback)
Globalized Islam: The Search for a new Ummah pinpoints growing Islam militancy not abroad but in the West, arguing that the revival of Islam among Muslims over the last few decades is more a force of the pressures of globalization than a reaction to the West. In moving beyond the traditional, more common ' East versus West' argument, GLOBALIZED ISLAM provides a new foundation for understanding modern Islam's sentiments and radicalism, offering an essential key to understanding not evident in similar-sounding discussions.

Diane C. Donovan

California Bookwatch
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28 of 64 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Where is Islam headed?, December 27, 2004
By 
Jill Malter (jillmalter@aol.com) - See all my reviews
There are plenty of ideas in this book. And I think it is worth reading, even though I rarely agreed with Roy's arguments or his conclusions.

The author begins by saying that "culturalists" say that "Islam is the issue." And he disagrees with them. Yes, the culturalists include just about everyone: Islamists, moderate Muslims, Islamophobes, anti-Islamophobes, and orientalists. But not him. He's not so sure it even makes sense to discuss a Muslim culture. And he sees what most of us think of as Islamic struggles actually being examples of nationalism and ethnicity. While Islam may provide some people with a sense of identity, he points out that in the war against Israel, there's no real difference politically between the seculars and the Islamists. And he asks if jihad is really closer to Marx (Karl, not Harpo or Groucho) than it is to the Koran.

I sort of blinked when I read that. While it might be true, I didn't quite agree with Roy's logic. He continued by explaining that the Chechens and the Levantine Arabs are engaged in liberation struggles. I think he's wrong about the Levantine Arabs. I see their struggle as being neither pro-religious, nor pro-nationalistic, nor even pro-ethnic, but very specifically anti-religious, anti-nationalistic, anti-ethnic, and against human rights. Roy calls the Levantine Arabs a people, but I see them as an antipeople who have no positive goals for themselves that need to be satisfied but only goals of hurting a people they have banded together to fight. All this is quite the opposite of a liberation struggle. And using Islam as a means to get people to identify with one side in this fight does indeed make Islam at least part of the issue.

Roy continues by discussing the fact that Muslims still come up with polemics against competing religions. According to the author, Christians, for the most part, do not. Well, the Catholics do not. The Evangelicals and the Christian Right Wing do. And Roy concludes that the Christians aren't really competing against Islam. But once again, I think he's overlooking the possibility that some people might consider polemics to be poor form. I'm as willing as anyone to discuss the advantages of polytheism over monotheism. But I do not want to appear as though I am trying to impose religious practices on others.

Next, the author discusses the Westernization of Islam. Some of this section was quite interesting, especially the age-old differences between Sufis and Salafis. And later, there is a section on the future of Muslim terrorism and questions of deterritorialization. Once again, I had to ask what he really meant by that. Muslim terrorists exist in time and space just like the rest of us. At best, he meant to differentiate between explicit state support and implicit support from many of the people in a state.

Near the end of the book, Roy says that this is a time of great intellectual confusion. As an example, anti-imperialist "supporters" of Women's Rights support the Taliban! Well, if he thinks he is confused, that is fine. I'm not. If you support the Taliban, you do not support Women's Rights.

Yes, it is true that some Christian moderates are in an alliance with some Muslim fundamentalists. Some of them appear to be in this alliance to fight against Christian fundamentalists and Jews. And it may be interesting to see why. And yes, some Jewish moderates and Christian fundamentalists are allied as well, just to defend themselves. Once again, it may be interesting to see if these alliances extend to anything more than that. And I think it could be a good idea to investigate the very rare alliances of Muslim moderates and Jewish fundamentalists. But I think Roy has not offered us much merely by saying that there are alliances which cut across religious and political boundaries.

I found the book interesting, and I think it contains some intriguing facts.
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10 of 31 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Interesting Points, Difficult Reading, May 26, 2005
This is a quite interesting, but somewhat difficult to read, book on the movement of Islamic people away from the traditional countries to live in the West. Obviously they bring their religion with them, yet at the same time they live in the west and generally have adopted Western ways.

Intermixed with this is discussion on the more radical elements of Muslim people. He especially talks a lot about Ben Ladin and other armed groups such as Palestinians, Chechens, the Balkans and others. He appears to view them as only the radical fringe.

When he talks about Christians, he generalizes, ignoring the radical fundamental fringe in the United States that blows up abortion clinics; and the conflict in Northern Ireland. This may well be due to his being French and living in Europe.

The points he makes are sometimes difficult to understand, but that may well be because of the language. I'd hate to have someone review a book I'd written in French.
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18 of 52 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Engulfed in details, November 13, 2004
The author presents bewildering array of facts. He certainly had enormous knoledge on the subject. It is a pity that he prefers to play with words instead of offering a proper analysis. Two quotations:

"When everything has to be Islamic, nothing is". Really?

"The illusion held by the Islamic radicals is that they represent tradition, when in fact they express a negative form of westernisation". Meaning what?

Still, if you have plenty of time and patience it might be worth to decode the convoluted paths of Mr. Roy arguments. I still have not make it to the end of the book - reading more than 30 pages daily is not possible.
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15 of 59 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars One thing right, November 17, 2004
One thing is 100% correct here. Islamism is a direct reaction tot he west, employing western concepts like 'human rights' and such other odd ideas to then attack the west. THe Islamic world was much more liberal and moderate before it came into contact with the west. The current wave of terrorism and hatred is based much more on islamic reading and studying in the west then actually the original 'Islamic civilization' before contact with the west. for instance the hatred of 'womens rights' is more based on a hatred of the western woman, then it is the way Islamic women actually used to act. The anti-semitism of modern islam is anothee aspect that was wholly stolen from the West. The search for the 'real' islam is a waste and this book is correct in understanding the Islamism is merely a search, like communism, for a third way. It is the wests coddling of Islam that has emboldened its most fanatic members, it is the lefts support of terrorism that created the 'left wing' terrorism that then transformed into militant Islamic terrorism, it is the wests self hatred that has made Islam hate the west.
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