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  • Gloomy Sunday (1999) (Import All Region)
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Gloomy Sunday (1999) (Import All Region)


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Product Details

  • Actors: Erika Marozsan, Joachim Król, Ben Becker, Stefano Dionisi
  • Directors: Rolf Schubel
  • Format: NTSC, Color, Widescreen, Subtitled, Dolby
  • Subtitles: English, Korean
  • Region: All Regions
  • Number of discs: 114
  • Studio: YDM DVDVideo
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (66 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B0016BCYFQ
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #74,684 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)

Editorial Reviews

South Korean Edition DVD/German Soundtrack/Optional English,Korean Subtitles , easy to turn OFF..*****

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
5 star
49
4 star
12
3 star
4
2 star
0
1 star
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See all 66 customer reviews
Great acting the music of Gloomy Sunday is very beautiful.
George Riemer
It is a rare pleasure to watch a movie that portrays characters who have such depth and which so successfully delves into very complex relationships.
Matthew Thorne
With war comes the return of Hans, now a Colonel in the SS charged with cleaning out the Jews from Budapest.
dooby

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

76 of 78 people found the following review helpful By Daniel Jolley HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on November 20, 2006
Format: DVD
Gloomy Sunday (Ein Lied von Liebe und Tod) is a hauntingly beautiful gem of a movie, a unique blending of romance, drama, and tragedy all compressed under the oppressive weight of history. This film lives and breathes, transporting you back to 1930s Budapest with beautiful cinematography, a fascinatingly brooding musical score, and the most human of characters. Released in 1999, I have no idea why this German-Hungarian film took so long to make its way to American audiences or why it was not rewarded with an Oscar for Best Foreign Film. Those of us fortunate enough to have seen it have certainly appreciated it. Just asks the folks in Boston, who kept the film running for a record-breaking 70 weeks in 2004-2005. If you have a heart and soul, this film will touch and haunt them both for a long, long time.

The title refers to a song written by one of the characters, but the historical reference is to a song by Hungarian composer Rezso Seress which became known, especially in America, as the Hungarian Suicide Song. Supposedly, many souls took their own lives after basking in the emotional power of this melody, but there is virtually no corroboration for the stories that have grown up around it. (One should keep in mind that the era of the 1930s was a time of worldwide economic depression, in which the Nazi menace cast its foreboding shadow over Europe and eventually the entire world.) In the film, Gloomy Sunday is basically a love song, written by a pianist named Andras (Stefano Dionisi) for the absolutely captivating Ilona (Erika Marozsan). Ilona is the hostess of an elegant restaurant in which Andras finds employment as an in-house pianist.
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47 of 50 people found the following review helpful By dooby on October 30, 2006
Format: DVD
This is a lovely film in the tradition of grand tragic romances. It is based on a largely fictionalised account of the legend surrounding a well-known love-song from the 1930s, "Gloomy Sunday". The song acquired its notorious nickname of "The Hungarian Suicide Song" because of the rumour (largely false) that it caused a wave of suicides of depressed lovers who listened to it. The original song was written by Hungarian composer Rezso Seress who earned a fortune as a result of its worldwide popularity. The film version of the story has little resemblance with reality.

The film is a German/Hungarian co-production based on the novel by Nick Barkow - "Das Lied vom Traurigen Sonntag". It begins in the present day but reaches back to a more idyllic time in 1930s Budapest. Illona (Erika Marozsán) is a dewy-eyed Hungarian beauty who is loved by 3 men, Laszlo (Joachim Król), a Jewish Restauranteur, András (Stefano Dionisi), a penniless pianist, and Hans (Ben Becker), an up-and-coming German businessman. Andras writes the song "Gloomy Sunday" as a birthday gift and an expression of love for Illona. Illona loves both the pianist and the restauranteur and despite their rivalry, they become friends at her insistence. With Laszlo's help, Andras' song is published, recorded and lauded worldwide. Hans, a frequent customer at the restaurant is the first to propose to Illona. When she turns him down, he almost becomes the first casualty of the song's curse. In despair, he jumps off the Széchenyi Bridge into the Danube. He is rescued by Laszlo who consoles him and nurses him back to health. Hans pledges his eternal gratitude to Laszlo. With Hans' return to Germany, the remaining trio maintain a pretty congenial ménage à trois, which lasts until the arrival of WWII.
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18 of 20 people found the following review helpful By Matthew Thorne on October 22, 2006
Format: DVD
It is a rare pleasure to watch a movie that portrays characters who have such depth and which so successfully delves into very complex relationships. The subject matter is grim, but the humanity of this film makes it uplifting. I have watched at least 500 movies in the last couple of years and this is one of the two best!
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Galina on October 22, 2008
Format: DVD
Gloomy Sunday - Ein Lied von Liebe und Tod directed by Rolf Schübel in 1999 is a romantic, absorbing, beautiful, and heartbreaking movie. It started like Jules and Jim; it ended as one of Agatha Christie's books, and in between it said something about love, friendship, devotion, jealousy, war, Holocaust, dignity, and betrayal, and it did better than The Black Book which is much more popular. It is not perfect, and it made me, a cynic, wonder in the end on the complexity of the relationships and sensational revelations, and who is who to whom but the movie simply overwhelmed me. Perfect or not, it is unforgettable. All four actors as the parts of the tragic not even a triangle but a rectangle were terrific. I do believe that three men could fell deeply for one girl as beautiful and dignified as Ilona in a star-making performance by young Hungarian actress Erica Marozsán and who would not? The titular song is haunting, sad, and beautiful, and no doubt deserves the movie been made about it and its effect on the countless listeners. I love the movie and I am surprised that it is so little known in this country. It is a gem.

The fact that it is based on a story of the song that had played such important role in the lives of all characters made me do some research, and the real story behind the song of Love and Death seems as fascinating as the fictional one. The song was composed in 1930s by Rezsö Seress and was believed to have caused many suicides in Hungary and all over Europe as the world was moving toward the most devastating War of the last century. Rezsö Seress, a Jewish-Hungarian pianist and composer, was thrown to the Concentration Camp but survived, unlike his mother. In January, 1968, Seress committed suicide in Budapest by jumping out of a window.
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Topic From this Discussion
Who were the people at the very end?
Remember when Ilona appeared pregnant at Ars' grave? The man at the end was Lazlo's son; you can see the resemblance. The woman was Ilona, owner of the restaurant after Lazlo signed it over to her to ensure that it wouldn't be taken from him by the Nazis. She used the poison that Ars originally... Read More
Oct 3, 2011 by Deborah L. Alpi |  See all 5 posts
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