A Glorious Defeat: Mexico and Its War with the United States and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Buy New
$14.25
Qty:1
  • List Price: $15.00
  • Save: $0.75 (5%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Add to Cart
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

A Glorious Defeat: Mexico and Its War with the United States Paperback – May 13, 2008

ISBN-13: 978-0809049677 ISBN-10: 0809049678 Edition: 1st

Buy New
Price: $14.25
44 New from $5.93 60 Used from $5.19
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$14.25
$5.93 $5.20

Free%20Two-Day%20Shipping%20for%20College%20Students%20with%20Amazon%20Student




Frequently Bought Together

A Glorious Defeat: Mexico and Its War with the United States + Voices of Freedom: A Documentary History (Third Edition)  (Vol. 1)
Price for both: $36.16

Buy the selected items together

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Save up to 90% on Textbooks
Rent textbooks, buy textbooks, or get up to 80% back when you sell us your books. Shop Now

Product Details

  • Paperback: 240 pages
  • Publisher: Hill and Wang; 1st edition (May 13, 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0809049678
  • ISBN-13: 978-0809049677
  • Product Dimensions: 8.2 x 5.5 x 0.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 4.8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (20 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #25,226 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Henderson, on the faculty of Auburn University, offers a survey of the Mexican War from a Mexican perspective. Instead of the common depiction of Mexico as the victim of the U.S. and its racist Manifest Destiny, Henderson emphasizes Mexican agency in going to war, which reflected a profound sense of weakness. Mexico's revolutionary experience had produced a virulent factionalism based on divisions of race, class, region and ideology. The Texas revolt of 1836 only made it more clear that Mexico was too weak to populate, control and defend its northern territories, but that opinion was derided within Mexico. Instead, politicians of every stripe denounced the policies of their rivals. The only common denominator was that Texas must be reconquered, even if that meant war with overwhelmingly superior U.S. military and economic power. But the Mexican people remained largely indifferent—otherwise Winfield Scott's landing at Vera Cruz and his decisive march on Mexico City would have been impossible. Mexico, unable to pursue a pragmatic strategy of negotiation and compromise, suffered—and celebrated—a "glorious defeat" that further unraveled a disunited nation. 8 pages b&w photos not seen by PW. (May)
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Booklist

As a result of the 1846-48 war with Mexico, the U.S. absorbed considerable territory, but, as explored in clear prose in this absorbing account, the ramifications of that armed conflict stretched, for both countries, well beyond territorial loss and gain in terms of aggravating sectional disputes (centered on the spread of slavery) within the U.S and darkening the Mexican-American relationship for a long time to come. The special quality of Henderson's study is twofold: first, how carefully he explains the antecedents of the war itself; second is the expansiveness of his view, focusing equal time on the Mexican political currents that drew that country into an impossible war and the political currents in the U.S. that compelled it into an insistence that war must occur. An important aspect of this dual view of the conflict is Henderson's systematic but fascinating appraisal of why the war progressed badly for Mexico and successfully for the U.S. This unique contribution to the literature of the era is perfectly suitable to general readers. Brad Hooper
Copyright © American Library Association. All rights reserved --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
5 star
13
4 star
3
3 star
2
2 star
2
1 star
0
See all 20 customer reviews
This is a serious oversight in an otherwise excellent book.
Cherie M
Most presidents were military leaders who were installed in office by military force.
Leonard J. Wilson
As I read his book, most of it came across as very familiar.
C. A. Temm

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

45 of 48 people found the following review helpful By James V. Holton on June 4, 2007
Format: Hardcover
This book is a great read on a topic that is too often ignored by Americans (North Americans, that is!)--the origins of US-Mexican relations. Packed into 191 pages, this book is concise without losing anything necessary to tell the story. Henderson zeroes in on the flip side of Manifest Destiny and discusses the impact of US expansionism on its southern neighbor. He does so without reducing the Mexicans to passive victims of US greed, but active agents in their own destiny...and their own defeat as it turns out. Henderson develops the main Mexican protagonist in this drama, Antonio Lopez de Santa Anna, as a full-blooded and fatally flawed character in Mexican history. Stephen Austin and his role as Texas empressario and later Texas/US patriot is also fully discussed here.

The book is also a valuable contribution to the debate over immigration from Mexico, and the pervasive hostiliy that has affected it.

Casual readers of American history may be surprised by the less than flattering image of the Lone Star State during this time.

Military buffs beware--this book does not dwell on either the military strategy or tactics used in the war.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Kevin M Quigg VINE VOICE on December 17, 2007
Format: Hardcover
An excellent book about how the Mexican-American War took place. The author shows how the politics and evolution of both countries resulted in the war of 1846-1847. Mexico and her politicians knew they were going to lose the war, but because of stubborness and pride, they decided on the confrontation with the Americans. Polk pursued the expansion of the country out of a Manifest Destiny belief. Little of the writing is on the war itself, 95% of the book is the politics that brought about the war. I commend the author on going against the trend of writing about battles, and focusing instead on why both parties found themselves at war.

This is a nice informative read about the war. The author research his topic well and made it very readable. For those interested in this long forgotten war, this is a nice book.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
11 of 12 people found the following review helpful By C. A. Temm on November 24, 2007
Format: Hardcover
Dr Henderson as a history teacher at AUM (Auburn University at Montgomery AL)is the resident expert on South/Central America. As I read his book, most of it came across as very familiar. He had expounded these same thoughts in several of his classes taught at the University. I have had the fortune to take several of them and can assure readers, he is as good a teacher as he is a writer.

What Dr Henderson does is blow away some very old fables created by both sides. He highlights the simple fact that Santa Anna was not the only individual in Mexico who wanted, for whatever reason, a war with the US. A faction riven Mexico, so brillantly illustrated in detail in this book stumbled into a war for many reasons, not least of course was nationalism. Santa Anna simply rode the wave to power and managed to get killed thousands of Mexican conscripts in a war against a smaller tho much better led and equipped foe.

Another fable is the one of the well equipped/trained Mexican army...no one disputes the Mexican soldiers bravery, especially the US army of the time but no one talks about the quality of the Mexican forces themselves. American regulars far outmatched their opponents in every manner. American militia units also performed better than then Mexican opponents (of course the Americans were all volunteers) The American officers also were generally of better quality and only in the engineers were the Mexicans on par with their enemies. Equipment goes without saying, in every aspect the Americans had at least equal (cavalry wpns/infantry muskets) and in artillery, naval power, logestics-the Americans dominated their enemies.

American politicans too get their comeuppance, Polk is aptly labeled the chief instigator of the actual war.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
8 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Thomas on April 14, 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I finished up this book a few weeks ago, and I'd like to say that the storytelling in it was gripping. I had a hard time putting it down. The description of the political situation in Mexico during the first half of the 19th Century was absolutely amazing, as well as the earlier Texas Rebellion.

Yet, the book left me with a strange taste in my mouth....

Henderson starts off with describing the very stark differences in which the American Colonies and Mexican Colony were founded, governed, and finally, freed. As well as the differences as far as economic prosperity and political stability between the two young nations. This is important in learning about how historically incredible the American tradition is, but it wasn't quite clear what the author was getting at. Then, at least three times during the book, the author states, and I'm paraphrasing, that the War between the US and Mexico did nothing to resolve the socio and economic differences between the two nations. Nowhere did Henderson state that this was a war aim, or any sort of goal of either nation. So why the political commentary?

I thought the book was great otherwise, very well written and the description was captivating. Just know I got a very La Reconquista-esque "blame America first" vibe from the book that I'm still a little confused about.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Search