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34 of 34 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Terrific gluten-free bread recipes, with an easily remedied flaw - UPDATED Jan 9 2013
UPDATE: The "easily remedied flaw" mentioned in my review (and noted by many other reviewers) has been addressed by the errata sheet now posted on Jennifer Katzinger's blog at jenniferkatzinger.wordpress.com.

ORIGINAL REVIEW: We've been eating gluten free and egg free for two or three years now. The hardest thing about that for me has been the lack of good...
Published 19 months ago by Sun Dog

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111 of 112 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Buyer Beware
After reading comments here that a number of recipes had errors I decided to write to the publisher to see if they had put together an errata sheet. They just sent me a copy and it's 4 pages long. There are substantial errors in terms of baking time/temperature in *23* of these recipes. I would not try to use this book without getting yourself a copy of the errata...
Published 18 months ago by Magpie Ima


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111 of 112 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Buyer Beware, January 4, 2013
By 
Magpie Ima (Portland, OR USA) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Gluten-Free and Vegan Bread: Artisanal Recipes to Make at Home (Paperback)
After reading comments here that a number of recipes had errors I decided to write to the publisher to see if they had put together an errata sheet. They just sent me a copy and it's 4 pages long. There are substantial errors in terms of baking time/temperature in *23* of these recipes. I would not try to use this book without getting yourself a copy of the errata sheet from Sasquatch Publishers (custserv@sasquatchbooks.com) or you are likely to be disappointed with your results. Frankly, I am astounded that such shabby work made it to print; hopefully the corrected recipes will produce tasty results
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34 of 34 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Terrific gluten-free bread recipes, with an easily remedied flaw - UPDATED Jan 9 2013, December 9, 2012
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This review is from: Gluten-Free and Vegan Bread: Artisanal Recipes to Make at Home (Paperback)
UPDATE: The "easily remedied flaw" mentioned in my review (and noted by many other reviewers) has been addressed by the errata sheet now posted on Jennifer Katzinger's blog at jenniferkatzinger.wordpress.com.

ORIGINAL REVIEW: We've been eating gluten free and egg free for two or three years now. The hardest thing about that for me has been the lack of good bread, not to mention great bread. We'd bought several gluten-free baking books and had yet to find a good bread recipe. They generally give one or more formulas for gluten-free flour mixes and then pretty much substitute those into conventional bread recipes with a few ad hoc adjustments. Similarly, the commercial GF breads available in our area, until very recently, have been, well, just plain bad, and by bad here I mean bad taste, bad texture, and bad-for-you ingredients in some cases. I LOVE chewy bread with a crunchy crust. Also, I think it's really important for sandwich bread to hold together when you make a sandwich. I had begun to think of gluten-free sandwiches as sadwiches. It seemed that bad bread was simply the cost of improved health.

Then two things happened. A few weeks ago some good commercial gluten free breads began to appear in our local stores. And then, I stumbled across Jennifer Katzinger's Gluten-Free and Vegan Bread. Yahoo!

I have to agree with the reviewers that found the baking times way too long (and/or too hot). There's something very strange about that because these are not small adjustments. Either something is seriously amiss with the calibration of Ms. Katzinger's test oven, or... Well, it's just strange. However, that was an easy fix for us and only cost us one loaf of bread to discover the problem. If you are at all competent in the baking department, don't let that flaw in the book stop you from buying it. If you are a novice, it may cost you four or five bad loaves to get the hang of it, who knows? If you love bread, it'll be worth it.

Ms. Katzinger has really thought through what each ingredient brings to the mix and how the preparation should best proceed, and she shares her reasoning. It looks to me like she started from the ground up, taking nothing for granted, and reinvented gluten free baking as a new culinary art form. For me, one excellent bread recipe would have justified the cost of the book, and we got that and much more. Kudos to you, Jennifer!

Another problem we had with our gluten free baking, unrelated to this particular book, was unreliable availability of all the various GF flours at all times, but we solved that when we found a good source online with one of the iherb-type web sites. Nothing can stop us now!

Now if someone would just solve the dismal gluten-free pasta problem. (Jennifer...?)
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20 of 21 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars 4 loaves, no success from experience bread maker, January 29, 2013
By 
Mathgod (Bay Area, CA) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Gluten-Free and Vegan Bread: Artisanal Recipes to Make at Home (Paperback)
I have made bread from scratch for almost 20 years. When my husband was diagnosed with a gluten intolerance 3 years ago I knew that my bread baking had to be completely rethought. I mean, when making regular wheat based bread you often add MORE gluten to help with the rise and texture of the bread.

I started with prepackaged mixes and although with time I figured out how to make a nice light loaf with a few tweaks, I was not too happy about the lack of nutritional value for these breads. My husband eats toast or an sandwich almost everyday so this is an important issue.

My husband cannot have dairy either so most of the other bread books call for alot of milk products so I was VERY excited to receive this Vegan Bread book. (I also noticed that the author had issued corrections and duly noted them before I started baking.)

I started with the wild mother started breads and the starter behaved exactly as planned but the first loaf (Teff Baton) was a disaster. I followed the recipe to the letter (except for the authors corrections) and while the loaf had a great flavor, I would be surprised if it rose 1/8 inch.

Next loaf was another sourdough (House Batard) and this time the loaf didn't rise at all. Into the trash.

Next was the Soft Quinoa Sourdough, this was marginally better with the rise, maybe 1/4 inch, and tasted good but still like a lead brick.

Ok, so by now I am thinking the Mother Starter is just not working at all. So I wanted to try the soft millet Sandwich Bread which was supposed to be one of the lightest yeasted breads in the book. I even bought new yeast to make sure that there would be no problems. Ok, maybe 1/2 inch rise which is the most I have gotten from the book, but certainly not light or remotely like regular bread.

I also have had major issues with the baking times (even with the shorter times at lower temperatures as she suggested in her corrections). The bread was done in about half the time. I checked the inside of the loaves with a instant read thermometer as the author suggested and they were done! I checked my over temperature with a OVEN thermometer to make sure that it was calibrated correctly (It was.)

If you read the info in the front of the book it talks a lot about OVENSRPING which is why she does not actually have the dough rise at all before putting it in the oven. Interesting theory but it have not proved true for me.

I also know that sourdough starters can get more powerful as you use them so I have not thrown out my Wild Mother Starter but will be adding extra yeast to the bread for a while.

Ok, so all this being said I think the recipes have potential for taste but I am going to abandon her notion of oven spring and letting the dough rise, etc... and I will get back to you.

UPDATE***

After a lot of reading and investigation I came to a few conclusions:

If "VEGAN" is what you are after, then this author is the best of the best although this book had a lot of errors as mentioned before. These recipes are for "Old World" type bread. Hearty and dense. VERY DENSE. I still am not too thrilled with the bread but if you don't mind heavier bread this book is alright (but not great.)

If "HEALTHY" and "Whole Grain" are what you are looking for but still want a relatively light bread, then I suggest that you get a "White Bread" gluten free bread book and then marry the to ideas to get a fairly light and mostly wholegrain bread. I have been experimenting with blending the ideas and flavors from this book with the recipes from Bette Hagman's "Gluten Free Gourmet Bakes Bread". (As a disclaimer, I probably would never make Ms. Hagman's recipes without major modification because while beautiful and light her bread has basically NO nutritional value and call for dough enhancer (which by the way is just Soy Lechitan, ground ginger, and vinegar granules. I can't have the soy so I mix in 1 tsp ground ginger and 1 tsp apple cider vinegar for each recipe), egg replacer, buttermilk powder, etc...)

I have had much success when making what I think of as "compromise" bread. Not vegan, not white, but a nice happy medium. But that being said, I would not have thrown myself into the middle ground if I hadn't had a lot of experience baking bread before.

Do pay attention to the yeast. There are three kinds: regular dry yeast, rapid rise, and instant. Do not proof INSTANT yeast with warm water before mixing with flours. Be careful not to overproof bread dough when using rapid rise and instant.

Happy Baking
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15 of 16 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Wonderful!!!!, November 19, 2012
This review is from: Gluten-Free and Vegan Bread: Artisanal Recipes to Make at Home (Paperback)
This is an amazing book! I have made several of the recipes and have found them to be all delicious. The baking times are off though. I recommend keeping an eye on the breads after the first hour and checking for doneness with a baking thermometer inserted into the loaf to read 210 degrees F. These breads are by far the best gluten free bread recipes I have ever had. I highly recommend this book!
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29 of 34 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Definite Must Have For GF Bakers, November 22, 2012
This review is from: Gluten-Free and Vegan Bread: Artisanal Recipes to Make at Home (Paperback)
My husband ordered this for me the week it was due to be released, and I'm absolutely thrilled to have it in my GF collection. I was pretty confident that the book would be a good one before it arrived, as I already have (and use with a great deal of joy) Jennifer Katzinger's other 2 excellent cookbooks (Gluten-Free and Vegan Holidays: Celebrating the Year with Simple, Satisfying Recipes and Menus and Flying Apron's Gluten-Free & Vegan Baking Book in pride of place on my shelves. Well... more 'covered with bits of various GF flour dusts, sticky fingerprints, bristling with neon booktabs & notes, within easy grabbing reach on the tiny patch of kitchen counter reserved for my "Look Here First"'s... but "Shelf" sounds like there is a chance I don't have a messy & cluttered kitchen. (Which, alas... I do. But it's also a happy one full of lovely smells, so it works for my family.) I was totally correct in my positive beliefs as well.

Now, to be completely fair & honest - there ARE some snags. A few recipes that missed one final proofread before being published and have either a misprinted ingredient amount (the arepas have too much water) or times & temps are a bit off. So if you are a completely new baker, someone totally unfamiliar with GF baking, or are in search of only the standard white breads and want only recipes that will be done in 30-minutes or less and have only a half dozen ingredients in each recipe... this isn't going to be the first GF baking book you want to invest in. For me, the time & temperature thing really isn't an issue - I'm stuck using a convection toaster oven for a few more months before I have the new stove installed, so ALL recipes in ALL cookbooks have to be fiddled about with regarding times & temperatures. I've also been playing in kitchens since I could hold a spoon, so I have a good grasp of what things should look like, feel like, etc and so feel comfortable figuring out how to wooge a recipe about. But I can see this being a bit of a hill to tackle for the new baker/new celiac. Even so, I honestly still think this is a book for everyone. It might not contain your go-to daily bread recipe, but it's inspirational baking. It's informative, creative, and an absolutely wonderful way to get yourself out of a food rut! It's a great resource, and honestly reads like an Artisinal Gluten Free Baking ~Course~. Once you work your way through the incredibly varied recipes, you will be comfortable tackling pretty much anything you might want to bake.

The small negative out of the way, on to the big reasons I love this book (as well as her others. I don't know Jennifer Katzinger, but if I ever get a chance to meet her one day... I rather hope being hugged by a goofy wench in thanks for all her hard work doesn't completely freak her out. My normal course of thanks to people is to bake them something, but considering how talented SHE is in the culinary world, I might have to instead offer to knit her a sweater or design & sew her a dress. She has honestly helped me regain my love of cooking & baking, and for that, I owe her a lot.) - First off is the amazing range in her recipes. This is a book of global breads, from savory crackers to lusciously rich sweet treats. She explores new techniques, gets into the nitty gritty of wild starter breads. Yeast breads to flat, quick breads to elegant fougasse, classic flavor combos to exciting new concepts. And ALL done without using a single solitary egg - and for THAT alone, I'd have the book in my collection. So many GF cookbooks seem to think that the only way to make GF bread is to shove a dozen eggs into each loaf. And I mean that literally. One of the first GF baking books I bought after being diagnosed with celiac called for ~14~ eggs in one loaf. I'm sorry. That's not a bread. That's a dried out nasty omelet. While I'm not a vegan, I AM allergic to eggs (on top of celiac and other allergies) so to have healthy, hearty, and tasty bread that I don't have to fiddle endlessly with trying to replace what essentially is the backbone of a recipe is an absolute wonder. I'm also thrilled to have a book that uses such a wide variety of GF flours and grains - I know some people complain because they don't want a shelf full of 'weird' ingredients that seem expensive... but frankly, the way to cook good AND affordable GF food IS to buy those oddball ingredients. It is cheaper to buy a bag of teff, some quinoa flakes, and chia seeds and be able to make yourself a couple dozen loaves of good bread - then to instead buy mass produced, tastes of grit & air premade loaves. Not to natter too much (too late, I know) but seriously. Spend perhaps $20 on flours & grains, and while at the time, you might reel a bit... that $20 can be used a dozen ways to make a dozen loaves of bread. In my area, buying a (usually frozen, thawed, refrozen, banged about, and then having to be thawed again on my counter!) loaf of GF bread tends to be between $6-$9 PER LOAF. You are already saving a ton by the 3rd or 4th loaf when you make it yourself. It's a false economy to holler that GF grains & flours are so expensive because a single loaf costs less. You aren't buying flour for one loaf of bread, you are buying it for the MONTH'S worth of bread.

This really is a wonderful book, and one I'm happily working my way through each and every loaf. No, the recipes aren't going to be done in 5 minutes, but when it comes to bread making, the true key ingredient in ALL bread - Gluten Free AND Gluten Filled - is a bit of time. And Jennifer Katzinger's recipes are well worth spending the time on.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant book...a need is met!, January 4, 2013
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This review is from: Gluten-Free and Vegan Bread: Artisanal Recipes to Make at Home (Paperback)
Love this book!! I too have realized the baking times are off for just the first chapter but my breads are turning out beautifully. I noticed right away it is important to use the yeast the author recommends (Fleishmans rapid rise). My favorite so far is the Broa! My petite buckwheat round turned out gorgeous when I used the rapid rise yeast, and it didn't rise when I used other yeast... I highly recommend this bread book!
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Errata appears to be included in current version, September 1, 2013
By 
Beanhauer (Bloomfield, MI) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Gluten-Free and Vegan Bread: Artisanal Recipes to Make at Home (Paperback)
I purchased this book, and immediately checked the errata page on the author's blog, as recommended by many reviews. My copy included all corrections made by the errata sheet. I believe the book has been corrected in the current run.
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12 of 14 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fabulous resource!, November 16, 2012
This review is from: Gluten-Free and Vegan Bread: Artisanal Recipes to Make at Home (Paperback)
I, and several of my friends, have found this book utterly inspiring. What a fabulous resource! Until the birth of my daughter (and my friends' babies) not one of us had ever been particularly vigilant about eating a gluten free or vegan diet, though we were familiar with the health benefits to planet and self that following such diets can create. However, once our babies arrived and seemed to be struggling with digestion (all of us breast feed our babies), we were each of us instructed to eliminate gluten, dairy, and refined sugar from our diets, which we did with obvious positive results for our babies. Not used to cooking for an exclusively vegan and gluten free diet, this book has been such a godsend at this time: delicious bread recipes for our whole family to enjoy! My daughter, now 16 months, loves to eat the breads we bake from this book, and it is fun to have her help with the baking, especially as there is no raw egg involved.

Now, please do not let this prejudice you against me, but I love a slice of fresh glutinous bread, ideally of organic and locally grown wheat, the brown bits removed, and lathered with some organic salty butter! So I felt a bit dubious about embarking on this book, but then the author's introduction on the science and art of baking with gluten free grains gripped me like a juicy novel. Her sharing of her understanding of how to successfully bake with gluten free flours seems downright generous given that her work in this field is pioneering, and the section exploring the trace minerals found in all of the grains included in the recipes made me feel so excited to begin. Some of the ingredients have been challenging to track down, but between my two local 'health food' stores, I' ve found they either stock them or have been happy to order them in especially, so it is worth asking if you struggle to find any of the ingredients. Also, I seem incapable of following any recipe in any book letter for letter, preferring to use them as a springboard, and the spirit of this book seems to embrace that, with enough background technique explained so that you cannot go too far astray. Perhaps most importantly, my family and I have found the recipes we have made from this book delicious, and we feel good when we eat them! Our sincere gratitude to the author.
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The answer to my prayers!, November 3, 2012
This review is from: Gluten-Free and Vegan Bread: Artisanal Recipes to Make at Home (Paperback)
I just baked my first loaf...and it is amazing! I have been looking for recipes for GF and vegan breads for months now and there isn't a lot out there that is any good (or good for you). Here is an entire book filled with recipes, and if they are all as good as the first loaf I baked...

The only problem that I had is that my bread was done a whole lot earlier than it was supposed to be, don't know what I did wrong?

P.S. The best surprise is that baking traditional yeast breads the way she does is easier than any bread recipe (GF or not) I have ever made, including the GF recipe for "Bread in 5 Minutes a Day."
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19 of 24 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars First recipe didn't even make it out of the bowl, November 10, 2012
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This review is from: Gluten-Free and Vegan Bread: Artisanal Recipes to Make at Home (Paperback)
Like another reviewer, I found an error. I tried to make the Arepas today, and it calls for a cup of cooked polenta (or precooked cornmeal) and a cup and a quarter of boiling water. Putting this together (with a smidge of oil and salt) should supposedly make a dough, but instead it makes a soup. I knew after I made the polenta that adding the water to it wouldn't make a dough, but I attempted it anyway in the hopes that I was just inexperienced, and perhaps an illogical magic would happen. As expected, it just made a watery mess, and I had to throw it out. Not having made anything like this before, I was unable to self-correct the error. I thought maybe the polenta should have read "uncooked", but then why would the alternative also say "precooked"? Did she mean two cups of polenta rather than one? Less water? I've no idea, and I was too tired to try endless variations in the hope of getting it right (avoiding that process is why I bought a cookbook). I pre-ordered this title with shouts of glee when I first saw it, as being gluten-free and vegan is a tough road at times. To find an error in the first recipe I attempted doesn't give me much confidence to try the rest. I googled for a correction but couldn't find any. I was also disappointed to find that xanthan gum is included in the majority of recipes. The stuff makes many celiac folks (including myself) quite ill, so that leaves us with little of the book we can use (FYI - I checked the index via my Kindle copy and "xanthan gum" appears 100 times). There are a handful of recipes without it; when I feel like risking another recipe, perhaps I'll try another one and hope it's correct. I would suggest you get this from the library.
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Gluten-Free and Vegan Bread: Artisanal Recipes to Make at Home
Gluten-Free and Vegan Bread: Artisanal Recipes to Make at Home by Jennifer Katzinger (Paperback - October 30, 2012)
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