Go For It

July 18, 2006 | Format: MP3

$11.49
Song Title
Time
Popularity  
30
1
3:54
30
2
3:03
30
3
3:15
30
4
4:16
30
5
3:46
30
6
2:43
30
7
5:27
30
8
2:22
30
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3:02
30
10
4:42
30
11
4:54
30
12
3:28
30
13
2:58
30
14
25:20
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Product Details

  • Original Release Date: July 18, 2006
  • Release Date: July 18, 2006
  • Label: Ryko/Rhino
  • Copyright: 1989 EMI Records
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 1:13:10
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B001RY441Y
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (11 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #124,018 Paid in Albums (See Top 100 Paid in Albums)

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Dansa on May 19, 2006
Format: Audio CD
"Go For It" might very well be punk's best keep secret. Much like the Clash's "London Calling" and Bad Brain's "I Against I," the rich album explodes out of the restrictions of the genre with a melting pot of diverse influences and songwriting. The band's goal was to make a pure singles album with every song designed to stand on its own with a unique voice, and for the most part they somehow pull it off convincingly. A common theme of taking risks and well "going for it" does seem to emerge throughout a wide variety of lyrical topics that seem to cover everything under the sun. Seriouisly, name a topic and the main songwriting team of Burns/Ogilvie probably presents it in a fresh, straightforward, and intelligent way on this album; sex, love, alienation, domestic violence, working class angst, random violence, rocking out, and even the problem with young marriages of convience.

The aggression of punk is either controlled or not present at all though every song is dripping with very urgent passion in both playing and Burn's wonderful singing voice that ranges from soft and pleasant to hoarse and emotional. Like the musicianship, the production is very accomplished and of unusual high quality for the genre and era. The popular opening cover of "Roots, Radicals..." surpisingly leans more towards the up-tempo righteous rage of Punk than Ska, while moody Dub dominates slow ballads like the melancholy "The Only One" and the soaring powerhouse "Safe as Houses." "Just Fade Away" and "Kicking up Racket" are upbeat pop guitar jubliations,and Cluney's romantic rockabilly number "Gate 49" might be the most sincere and understated of the common "life on the road" rock songs.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Walleroonie on March 14, 2011
Format: Audio CD
Just felt I had to chuck my two pennyworth in.

I like the Fingers, they were a great band, the first two albums I loved. Hanx was a good live album (although I preferred the Ramones - It's Alive and the Subs - Crash Course). This though is far from SLF at their best - having read the reviews below, it's apparent that Roots is the most favoured song on the album.

Personally, I don't get it - listen to the early SLF, it was proper angst and protest, getting at the establishment - JB could write that stuff by the bucket load and good it was too, he didn't fare as well with relationships, it was confusing at times - new manish one minute, old laddish the next, Sham did social commentary far far better.

The stand out track is Piccadily Circus, Racket and Fade Away are next in line, the rest are just decent or bubbling under. Sadly though, this was them at their suposed peak - yes they're still going but mostly playing to St Patricks day audiences or those of an Irish bent, all that tricolour waving doesn't do it for me.

A reviewer mentions below that they're about the only band still going from the first wave - well not quite, their last studio album of new material was released in 2001, since then they've just gig'd. Compare them to the UK Subs who formed before and have just released their 23rd album and gig constantly. The appetite for going to see bands who have reformed continues to grow, you can see plenty of the 70's/80's punk bands on the bandwagon these days - for most sadly, 30 years on it's not a pretty sight.

Buy this by all means but don't expect the brilliance of the first two albums.

As for Fingers though, I do believe though that in their day, they were just awesome.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Thomas A. Corpino on February 18, 2004
Format: Audio CD
Stunning...Superb. Imaginative...Intense. Bombastic...
Beautiful. Caustic...Caressing. THE most important punk
band from the U.K. ever, evolved into, simply put, a great
rock n' roll band. A full-on treatment of scream along/sing
along anthems, sung by both Burns and Cluney. Starting with
a corrosive cover (and AMAZING live staple) of "Roots, Radicals,
Rockers, Reggae" and finishing with the harrowing "Piccadilly
Circus" (if you listen closely you can hear the switchblade
slash), with some Motown, some Stray Cats, and some dubby
reggae all mixed together into a perfect amalgam.
Disc centerpiece-"Safe as Houses"- a plaintive, poignant ditty
about Irish life...marrying the girl next door...and moving/
staying on the same block as "Mum and Dad". THE best song
Jake Burns has ever written-pure passion and power. And...
as a bonus you get a live take of The Specials "Doesn't Make
it Allright", which the Fingers downright destroy. (when
heard, you get that "icecube sliding down yer spine" feeling)
I may a bit biased (I've seen them live over twenty times)
and I've never EVER been disappointed, but this is one disc
you'll treasure like your firstborn. This is ALL THE BEST,
ALL THE REST, so, like, just "GO FOR IT"!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By "skak1" on March 10, 2002
Format: Audio CD
When Paul Morley wrote the review of this album in the UK music paper New Musical Express he described SLF as 'the greatest rock group in the world'. Ironically, this album turned many of the early fans away because it shows the group beginning to move away from their traditional punk format. What's more there is only one reference to Belfast and that is in the last song. This album doesn't have the same energy as Inflammable Material but it has considerably more variety- superb punk-reggae songs like 'Safe as Houses' co-exist with motown influenced ditties like 'Silver Lining'. The song-writing here is superb. The lyrics are what you'd expect of this group- mainly political and social comment. The group's musicianship had evolved considerably since the first album. A must for SLF fans or even for those just intrigued by who were this group which had such influence on (early) Sinead O'Connor, (early) U2, Ash, Green Day and the Dropkick Murphys.
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