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Go @#$% Yourself! An Ungentlemanly Disagreement Paperback – June 7, 2011


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 148 pages
  • Publisher: Olympia Press (June 7, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1608729990
  • ISBN-13: 978-1608729999
  • Product Dimensions: 0.3 x 5.2 x 7.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 6.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (11 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,472,014 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

3.9 out of 5 stars
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49 of 53 people found the following review helpful By Jason Benning on July 3, 2011
Format: Paperback
I read the first few chapters of this book because I know the author writes great articles for one of my favorite websites. Then I read a few more chapters because I thought maybe this book would be so bad it would be funny, and I could laugh at how bad it was. About halfway through I gave up and skimmed the rest. This is nothing more than a rant. Now some people can do rants very well, make them insightful or funny, but not this writer. He rehashes obvious political points others have made much better a dozen times before him and adds nothing new to the conversation. You get the idea this is the sort of person who just likes the sound of his own voice. The writing is aggressive and angry, sometimes at the government, sometimes at the reader, sometimes just for the sake of being angry. The "F-word" is thrown around like a punchline to jokes that are not there. This book is not funny at all, and the comparisons to Lewis Black and The Daily Show made by the other reviewers are so off the mark it makes me wonder if they are friends of the author.
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Format: Paperback
Note: I was offered a copy of An Ungentlemanly Disagreement by the author in exchange for an honest review.

I suspect "An Ungentlemanly Disagreement," by its very nature of being one long political and sociological rant, will be instantly divisive. You may love the spirited essays that challenge the modern world with pointed commentary on just about every topic under the sun. Or you may be instantly dismissive of a seeming attack against everything in the status quo. The book will likely brook little middle ground. Before discussing anything more in-depth from a philosophical viewpoint, however, I do want to say that I found the chapters exceedingly well written. The flow and cadence, particularly in the stronger earlier sections, have almost a profane lyricism. There is an eloquence to the ranting and raving that I wasn't really expecting--and it is, perhaps, the writing itself that I enjoyed most about this volume.

The author's most nefarious enemy is what he dubs the nanny state. In short, he is critical of public or governmental institutions having undue power or influence on how we live our lives. It's a fair point, and one that is covered at length. The book is populated with a fair share of humor--but it is more dry and satiric than joke-oriented. I found genuine merit and subtle amusement throughout the various arguments. And while you may not always agree with a particular rant, I just enjoyed reading them. The biggest and most successful arguments come from the book's first half--with the points becoming less specific and less evocative as the book moves on to incorporate more and more and more.

In truth, there is nothing new to many of the points made in "An Ungentlemanly Disagreement"--here they are just assembled in a subtly humorous way.
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4 of 7 people found the following review helpful By reluctantpopstar on January 5, 2012
Format: Paperback
I mean that in the worst possible way and the best possible way at the same time. Obviously we have a collection here of what are purported to be humourous rants, or if one wishes to be generous, essays. Yes, this is not serious political commentary. There is an attempt here at satire, which does have a long and noble tradition.

However, even within the construct of "going along with the joke," the authors' assumptions and contentions make very little sense. You see, the government is not a "Nanny state" preventing the authors, or anyone else, really, for that matter, from saying whatever it is that they wish to say. The proof is held right in the reader's hand. If the government were preventing them from distributing their foofery then this book would never have been published.

Who, or what, is preventing the author from screaming Anglo-Saxon syllables at the top of his lungs in the Public Square? It is not The Government. It is the magical "market forces" so cherished by many, that ghettoize the authors as dim-bulbs without much to say, who rely on the crutch of taboo words as a substitute for true insight. Such classification is clearly well deserved.

Skip it.
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2 of 5 people found the following review helpful By adhill on January 3, 2012
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I must admit I am a little biased, since i'm a bit of a fan of his work on Cracked.com, but this was truly a fascinating read. Most certainly worth the price of admission.
Anyone looking to get a bit of an idea of his style before purchasing should head over to Cracked.com...if you find him to suit your tastes there then this will be your style.
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Format: Paperback
This book is an extreme rant about the current state of the world and how it got that way. At the beginning, I thought that it would be a right-wing diatribe against everything liberal but that is not the case. The author vents his foul-mouthed anger on liberals and conservatives alike; the best way to describe his position is that he is an extreme libertarian with an attitude.
For example, Argenti argues for marriage equality, legalization and taxation of drugs, the hypocrisy of politicians that loudly proclaim their concern for liberty while taking it away, keeping government and politics out of the art world and even some of the positions of the gun lobby in the United States. The spectrum of coverage is so broad that nearly everyone will find something that they agree with and other things that they will disagree with.
After I finished the book my primary thought was that it is possible for someone to write and publish such a book. The right of free speech is a powerful and essential one in the United States, in a sense it is the most important one, for dissent has often been the driving force for positive change. Although the author does not view all changes as positive, you still have to respect the fact that Argenti is willing to express them.
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