Customer Reviews


190 Reviews
5 star:
 (84)
4 star:
 (60)
3 star:
 (20)
2 star:
 (13)
1 star:
 (13)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favorable review
The most helpful critical review


162 of 174 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Most Underrated Stones Album
Goat's Head Soup was originally released Aug 31, 1973 and went to #1 in both the US and the UK. I have found it quite rewarding that over the years this one has gained respect and continues to appear in many rankings of greatest rock albums. Personally, I've always like this one a lot. It's got the usual megahits; Doo Doo Doo Doo Doo (Heartbreaker), Angie, and...
Published on September 24, 2002 by Richard R. Carlton

versus
91 of 101 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars There's one reason you can't buy this...
I guess the big question I have is "why"? (Other than revenue). I used my new Cambridge Audio Azur 640C CD player, and my Grado Reference Series R2 headphones to compare this remaster with the 94 Virgin remaster.

This remaster is brighter and louder. The brightness is a tad annoying though because it's turned up so much that the highs are too "thin" -- the...
Published on May 30, 2009 by Brandon Carson


‹ Previous | 1 219 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

162 of 174 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Most Underrated Stones Album, September 24, 2002
By 
Richard R. Carlton (Ada, MI United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Goats Head Soup (Audio CD)
Goat's Head Soup was originally released Aug 31, 1973 and went to #1 in both the US and the UK. I have found it quite rewarding that over the years this one has gained respect and continues to appear in many rankings of greatest rock albums. Personally, I've always like this one a lot. It's got the usual megahits; Doo Doo Doo Doo Doo (Heartbreaker), Angie, and Star#$!@% (a hit as a single in Europe and Japan), an incredible jam in Can You Hear The Music, great intro in 100 Years Ago, part 2 of the voodoo chronicles in Dancing With Mr. D., solid rocker Silver Train, and oh yeah, Winter and Hide Your Love too. Most people know the music, so in my reviews I try to give you data on the sessions and interesting facts connected with the songs and the album. Here we go:
There were 23 songs recorded during the Goat's Head Soup sessions between Nov 25-30 and Dec 6-21, 1972 at Dynamic Sound Studios in Kingston, Jamaica. Only 8 of them made it onto Goat's Head Soup. Keith had made strong connections with the Jamaican reggae musicians and had recently bought a house in Jamaica, so he was the driving force behind the sessions. The band included Mick Taylor, Nicky Hopkins (piano), Billy Preston (organ), Bobby Keys (sax), Chuck Finley (trumpet), Jim Horn (horn), and of course Ian Stewart on piano. Sonny Rollins played sax on Waiting On A Friend. Final mixes were done at Island Recording in London May 28 - Jun 20, 1973. Hide Your Love was recorded in separate sessions on May 23 & 26 at Olympic Studios in London. Silver Train was recorded during the mixing at Island in London.
Interesting notes include:
.....The UK version of the album had one verse censored and deleted from Star#$!@% (which appears as Star Star in text on the album) while the US version had the line "I bet you keep your pussy clean" deleted. Both record distributors (US and UK) refused to allow the line "giving head to Steve McQueen" until the Stones got McQueen to sign a release (he said he appreciated the publicity). (The entire song with all the censored lyrics are on this release, or at least they are on my copy.)
.....Short And Curlies was not released until 1974 on the album It's Only Rock `n' Roll.
.....Tops and Waiting On A Friend were not released until 1981 on the album Tattoo You, after which Waiting On A Friend was also released as a single.
.....there are still 12 tracks from these sessions that have not been released (although some have been bootlegged) They are Criss Cross (Save Me), Separately, You Should Have Seen Her Ass, Four And In, Give Us A Break, First Thing, Miami, Man-Eating Woman, Brown Leaves, After Muddy & Charlie, Jamaica I, and Zabadoo.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


91 of 101 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars There's one reason you can't buy this..., May 30, 2009
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Goat's Head Soup (Audio CD)
I guess the big question I have is "why"? (Other than revenue). I used my new Cambridge Audio Azur 640C CD player, and my Grado Reference Series R2 headphones to compare this remaster with the 94 Virgin remaster.

This remaster is brighter and louder. The brightness is a tad annoying though because it's turned up so much that the highs are too "thin" -- the high-hats on Charlie's drums are tinny and have no pop at all. Upping the volume doesn't make the sound richer (my Grados don't lie folks). Mick's voice has a more resonant "separation" than the Virgin remaster -- it sounds less "muddled".

The packaging is a disappointment too. The Virgin "Collector's Edition" gives you the ACTUAL original album packaging (cardboard Goats Head Soup photo, and gatefold with "album" sleeve -- I have yet to see a better CD package for the Stones). This remaster groups all that together in a booklet, which makes you wonder again... why?

I bought all these remasters just to test out the sound, but I'm hoping Mick and the boys will take more control over their legacy before they let the record companies turn their catalog into the chaos that RCA has done to Elvis'.

And folks... whatever they've done to Star Star means the whole thing is corrupted. You cannot buy this as your only copy of GHS, because they've done some kind of censoring to Star Star. Why has this occurred? That alone means you need to skip this. I wonder... did the Stones OK this?
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


81 of 92 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An acquired taste, January 8, 2003
This review is from: Goats Head Soup (Audio CD)
This album has one of the strangest titles of a major band's releases I've ever heard. Where does the title come from? Perhaps the notion that it's something at first you wouldn't want and wouldn't like, but that after a while, you might decide, it's great. That's how this album is for me. Back in the 70s, I gave this album a few listens and dismissed it as so vastly inferior to the great streak of Stones albums that preceded it (Beggar's Banquet-Let it Bleed-Sticky Fingers-Exile on Main Street) that it wasn't worth my time.
Part of the problem is, the first song misleads listeners as to what the album is about. "Dancing with Mr. D" sounds like a parody of "Sympathy for the Devil" and to this day remains an annoying, clumsy song. But pretty much everything after that is, on repeated listenings, wonderful--soulful--reflective. "Coming Down Again" is exquisite, delicately depicting a waning high. "Winter" evokes loneliness and despair in a beautiful way. "Star Star" struts unabashedly. "Angie" has a vocal track that is surprisingly effective while totally eccentric, and a musical arrangement that's a tour de force. "Heartbreaker," "100 Years Ago" and "Silver Train" rock hard and convincingly. "Goat's Head Soup" is a subtle masterpiece that doesn't yield the kind of immediate pleasures of its classic predecessors, but it sticks with you just as long.
One key to the Stones success during this period, it's quite clear now, was producer Jimmy Miller. His association with the Stones began with the awesome single Jumpin' Jack Flash/Child of the Moon. He produced everything they did through this album. He created the space for Charlie Watts to earn recognition as the greatest drummer in rock. He allowed Mick Taylor to establish himself as the virtuoso soloist who could somehow fit into this rough-hewn band. He rescued Jagger's vocals from the murk of Andrew Loog Oldham's foggy production, and allowed him to try on the range of styles we now take for granted. He brought the best out of Mick and Keith as songwriters. He introduced the use of horns to underscore their gospel and urban blues roots. Jimmy Miller was an unsung hero, and to get everything he did, you have to get this album.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


29 of 30 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Censored!, October 15, 2009
This review is from: Goat's Head Soup (Audio CD)
I can't believe they released a censored version of this underrated classic stones album - pathetic. Why not just slap a parental advisory sticker on it. The stones should be ashamed of themselves!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


53 of 59 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Buyer beware - censored version, May 5, 2009
This review is from: Goat's Head Soup (Audio CD)
This new 2009 remastered edition has the censored version of 'Star Star.' If you want the uncensored version, seek out the 1994 Virgin edition.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


25 of 26 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Most Underrated Stones Album, July 19, 2004
By 
Richard R. Carlton (Ada, MI United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Goats Head Soup (Audio CD)
Goat's Head Soup was originally released Aug 31, 1973 and went to #1 in both the US and the UK. I have found it quite rewarding that over the years this one has gained respect and continues to appear in many rankings of greatest rock albums. Personally, I've always like this one a lot. It's got the usual megahits; Doo Doo Doo Doo Doo (Heartbreaker), Angie, and Star#$!@% (a hit as a single in Europe and Japan), an incredible jam in Hide Your Love, great intro in 100 Years Ago, part 2 of the voodoo chronicles in Dancing With Mr. D., solid rocker Silver Train, and oh yeah, Winter, Coming Down Again, and Can You Hear The Music too. Most people know the music, so in my reviews I try to give you data on the sessions and interesting facts connected with the songs and the album. Here we go:
There were 23 songs recorded during the Goat's Head Soup sessions between Nov 25-30 and Dec 6-21, 1972 at Dynamic Sound Studios in Kingston, Jamaica. Only 8 of them made it onto Goat's Head Soup. Keith had made strong connections with the Jamaican reggae musicians and had recently bought a house in Jamaica, so he was the driving force behind the sessions. The band included Mick Taylor, Nicky Hopkins (piano), Billy Preston (organ), Bobby Keys (sax), Chuck Finley (trumpet), Jim Horn (horn), and of course Ian Stewart on piano. Sonny Rollins played sax on Waiting On A Friend. Final mixes were done at Island Recording in London May 28 - Jun 20, 1973. Hide Your Love was recorded in separate sessions on May 23 & 26 at Olympic Studios in London. Silver Train was recorded during the mixing at Island in London.
Interesting notes include:
.....The UK version of the album had one verse censored and deleted from Star#$!@% (which appears as Star Star in text on the album) while the US version had the line "I bet you keep your pussy clean" deleted. Both record distributors (US and UK) refused to allow the line "giving head to Steve McQueen" until the Stones got McQueen to sign a release (he said he appreciated the publicity). (The entire song with all the censored lyrics are on this release, or at least they are on my copy.)
.....Short And Curlies was not released until 1974 on the album It's Only Rock `n' Roll.
.....Tops and Waiting On A Friend were not released until 1981 on the album Tattoo You, after which Waiting On A Friend was also released as a single.
.....there are still 12 tracks from these sessions that have not been released (although some have been bootlegged) They are Criss Cross (Save Me), Separately, You Should Have Seen Her Ass, Four And In, Give Us A Break, First Thing, Miami, Man-Eating Woman, Brown Leaves, After Muddy & Charlie, Jamaica I, and Zabadoo.
This information comes from "It's Only Rock And Roll: The Ultimate Guide To The Rolling Stones" by Karnbach and Bernson and from my own collection, with some of the notes from Davis' "Old Gods Almost Dead." Both books are available from amazon.com.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


19 of 21 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars can you feel the magic?, September 30, 2005
This review is from: Goats Head Soup (Audio CD)
The Stones, before they found chardonnay, fitness trainers and capitalism and turned into the most amazing (and in some ways lovable) money machine in the history of music, had a feel of menace and danger around them. Their songs, like "Sympathy for the Devil," in the times they were recorded, scared people. Not like "Revolution No. 9" scared people, but in a way that was very tangible. Altamont only sealed the deal. Goats Head Soup represents the tail end of that sharply focused menace, as the depleted Stones reach the end of the line, dipped in coke and heroin and sleazy sex and strung out on the end of the 60's idealism they always seemed to reject and expose, finally drowned by their own dark brand of hedonism. It should have been a mess, but these are the Stones and you don't get tagged as the world's greatest rock n roll band without the talent to back it up. Jagger and Richards rank among the very best and prolific songwriters we have ever known in any genre, and here they chart their own demise in a way that some fans just can't relate to. Much of the music sounds fatigued, but in a way that the fatigue becomes their "sound." Goats Head Soup is an album about being very tired, very wasted, still dancing with Mr. D way past the time to stop. The party is way past over, but the Stones remain, snorting up every last line in the most unhealthy manner. This album is the final nail in the coffin of the 60s, a sobering artifact and cautionary tale, and, to these ears, decline has never sounded this sad, this alluring and inviting. There is a voodoo here, particularly at the end of "Can You Hear The Music," a slow descent into a druggy jungle and madhouse, where the music becomes an echoey, fading hollow shell, but where so many people and fans reject it as the Stones as band at rock bottom, I see it as the Stones inhabiting and almost luxuriating in their beautiful ruination. Jagger, as if from a hospital bed, moans "Can you feel the magic" and it is the magic of a man, who, with his band, has been blown out to the edge of death, derangement and depravity and brought you along in harrowing, blues-burnt, rock-gut song. All that and "Angie."
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


19 of 21 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A flawed GEM not a rough Diamond like Exile, May 6, 2000
This review is from: Goats Head Soup (Audio CD)
This is not the greatest "Stones" album, I don't think Keith was there for most of it, but it is an emotional masterpiece. Some of Mick's most passionate lyrics and vocals are here - Winter(My all time favourite Stones song) Angie (love it or hate it). Even the comic Dancing with Mr D has it's vocal moments. Mick Taylor lifted some of the ordinary tracks with his brilliant work - 100 Years Ago, Silver Train and Hide Your Love. It all came together in Winter, listen to Taylor's solo in this one! In fact this is more like a solo album from Mick Jagger with Mick Taylor doing most of the guitar work. The exception, Coming Down Again is Keith's best ever vocal performance and it too is packed full of emotion. This album won't appeal to die hard Stones Blues/Rock fans. It does take time to grow on you and is well worth the effort. It was a bold attempt at something new and is probably the last of the great Albums they produced. After this there were great tracks but not albums. This was my most played Stones album of the 70's and I still enjoy it today. Bryan
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars My Guilty Pleasure Favorite Stones Album, October 8, 2008
This review is from: Goats Head Soup (Audio CD)
I am the Stones authority. And this is their most underrated outing during their peak years of 1968 through 1973. Its reputation suffers among Stones purists for two reasons - it was judge at the time in light of recent Stones history and the breath taking string of master albums that preceded it, beginning with Beggars Banquet and Let It Bleed to end the Sixties, and then Sticky Fingers and Exile On Main Street to kick off the Seventies. So what album would look impressive in this company? The second reason this album's reputation suffered with Stones purists was the radio single that became the hit representing this album. As "Start Me Up" taints Tatoo You with the Stones aficionado, so too in the minds of many Stones fans does "Angie" taint this album - which is unfortunate really, because few songs have aged as well as that single. "Angie" was the song that was popular with people who were not Stones fans - and to any purist who feels that a band belongs to them, because they love the songs that nobody knows, especially those beautiful people phonies who never loved the band, but now dance to "Angie" - well, this was more than many Stones fans could stomach and so they dismissed it outright. I was one of them. But "Angie" is a great song. I'll stack "Heartbreaker" up against "Brown Sugar" "Rocks Off" and "Bitch" any day. "100 Years Ago" is every bit as unique and wonderful as "Sway", and "Winter" is nearly as haunting and just as wonderful as "Moonlight Mile". "Star, Star" is just flat out cool fun, and "Hide Your Love" and "Can You Hear The Music" are the rarely traveled netherworld of rythms not seen since Our Satanic Majesties Request and not revisited again until side two of Tatoo You. It is great stuff.

For many they count this album as the beginning of the Stones Seventies glam period that finished with Emotional Rescue in 1979 and reached its peak with Some Girls in 1978. And that is true. But it is also true that this is the final movement of a stretch of creative output unrivaled in Rock history - the coda on a brilliant five album run. For me it is both, and a necessary bridge of departure from one era onward to another. And when I am sitting around with my purist Stones friends drinking and telling lies, well, we'll be listening to Exile On Main Street, because that is the proper thing to do, but when I am alone and thinking about the days of youth gone by this is the album I'll pull off the shelf and drift away to a time and place far, far away, magical, fresh and alive.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Overlooked, January 8, 2005
By 
Garrett Strantz "gilbert125" (South Bend, Indiana United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Goats Head Soup (Audio CD)
When the great Stones albums are discussed Goats Head Soup is generally passed over. The truth is, albums such as Exile on Main Street, Beggars Banquet, and Let it Bleed are all wonderful albums and deserving of the praise they receive. These albums contain some of the Stones' best known works, as well as a number of good album tracks that rarely get airtime even today, which is surprising given the glut of classic rock radio stations.

Comparitively, Goats Head Soup really shouldn't compare as its two 'name' songs are Angie and Doo^5 (Heartbreaker)-- two good songs, but not necessarily classics. On the strength of its money songs, GHS really does not compare at all with the best Stones albums. Two things though make this album, in my estimation, an essential Stones piece and a legitimate classic.

First, the album holds together quite well. Even on the best Stones albums there tends to be a mediocre song or two that is hard to sit through. This may seem like a backhanded compliment, but nothing on GHS is all that bad. I know a number of Stones fans dislike "Can You Hear the Music" but I don't find it to be anything I immediately skip over.

Second, GHS' strongest point is that it includes a number of excellent "surprise" songs. "Dancing with Mr. D" is far from the greatest Stones opener of all time, but it's menacing riff propels an average song to greater heights. "100 Years Ago" is a quieter, nostalgic song that also stands out. Finally there's "Winter," one of my personal Stones favorites and a song that I could not believe I had never heard until purchasing the album. I'm not sure what to say about it other than that I would wager the Counting Crows were quite familiar with it by the time they penned "A Long December."
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 219 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

Details

Goats Head Soup
Goats Head Soup by The Rolling Stones (Audio CD - 1994)
Add to wishlist See buying options
Search these reviews only
Send us feedback How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you? Let us know here.