Qty:1
  • List Price: $19.95
  • Save: $3.57 (18%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Temporarily out of stock.
Order now and we'll deliver when available.
Order now and we'll deliver when available. We'll e-mail you with an estimated delivery date as soon as we have more information. Your account will only be charged when we ship the item.
Details
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
God and General Longstree... has been added to your Cart
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: different cover...same ISBN number...No writing/highlighting of text present with spine/cover creases
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

God and General Longstreet: The Lost Cause and the Southern Mind Paperback – March 1, 1995

9 customer reviews

See all 4 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$16.38
$2.49 $0.01

Best Books of the Year So Far
Best Books of the Year So Far
Looking for something great to read? Browse our editors' picks for 2015's Best Books of the Year So Far in fiction, nonfiction, mysteries, children's books, and much more.
$16.38 FREE Shipping on orders over $35. Temporarily out of stock. Order now and we'll deliver when available. We'll e-mail you with an estimated delivery date as soon as we have more information. Your account will only be charged when we ship the item. Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 158 pages
  • Publisher: Louisiana State University Press (March 1, 1995)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0807120146
  • ISBN-13: 978-0807120149
  • Product Dimensions: 8.5 x 5.5 x 0.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12.6 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (9 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,376,710 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

13 of 16 people found the following review helpful By Daniel Hurley VINE VOICE on August 22, 2003
Format: Hardcover
If you want to know how the Lost Cause syndrome got its start and how Longstreet to his shock became the designated failure of the Confederacy, this is a revealing book. Old Pete survived his crippling wounds incurred by bullets during his great counter attack in the Wilderness but the ink from "Old Jube's" (Jubal Early's) pen created greater harm and anguish to Longstreet as Early effectively destroys his reputation. Early holds a tight grasp of southern history and the Southern Historical Society making sure that no one dared write anything about the War of the Rebellion without his approval. How ironic that the man that moved Alexander's auxiliary guns away during Pickett's charge, the former and inefficient Pendleton, makes up a bogus story about Longstreet disobeying a sunrise attack order on the second day of Gettysburg in a speech shortly after Lee died and blames Longstreet solely for the lost battle and in turn the "cause". Early picks up the ridiculous story to exaggerate Pendleton's story to gross proportions while coloring his own role that is very suspect in not supporting an attack on Culp's Hill on the first day of Gettysburg and he also pushed Ewell in not moving his corps to the right as Lee wished failing to contract Lee's over extended lines. Old Jube was a tough fighter but had a hard time with cavalry particularly in the Valley where Lee finally has Early relieved. Unlike Longstreet and Lee, Early left the country after the war and upon his return made a career out of rewriting history to suit his slant. Jubal Early could have been the Roy Cohn of the post Civil War era.Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By J. F. Rodriguez on September 23, 2011
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I consider myself an avid Civil War history reader and James Longstreet admirer. I was anticipating reading more on how General Longstreet's reputation became tarnished and 'trashed' by Jubal Early and his compatriots in an effort to place blame on Dutch Longstreet for the loss at Gettysburg, and elevating Lee to 'Saint" status after the war. In my opinion, Gen. Longstreet was Lee's most capable and dependable Corps commander - Lee's "Old War Horse."

This book is about the 'Lost Cause' myth and how it came about, and only mentions James Longstreet in a 'few' lines. The book is very interesting and factual, but I believe the title is misleading.

Buy it to read about the Lost Cause origins, but not to read about James Longstreet.

PS: If you are in North Georgia, a visit to his grave site in Alta Vista Cemetery,Gainesville, GA, is well worth it. Don't forget to leave a cigar for Ole Dutch!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Thomas W. Robinson on March 20, 2009
Format: Paperback
I've long been a student of the Civil War Era and the Lost Cause is one of the facets of the Civil War that I have long been interested in. This is a short book by Connelly (one of my favorite CW historians, by the way) and Bellows, but it is still one of the better ones on the Lost Cause. This work is more about the Southern mind and how Southern writers built up the Lost Cause and how it has evolved up until this book was originally published in the early 1980s. It also gives an excellent look at how Robert E. Lee became the symbol of the South, which Connelly wrote an entire book about as well. What emerges is the Lost Cause evolved from petty in-fighting about who was to blame for Confederate defeat (hence the Longstreet part of the title) to the creation of an image of the South that was both romantic and tragic. Connelly and Bellows argue that by World War I, the entire nation embraced this image and the dual image of the South has remained. This is a very interesting book and one that should be read by all students of the South, not just people interested in the Civil War. I give it 4 stars instead of 5, however, because there are not endnotes or footnotes so we have no idea where the authors are getting their source material, a big no-no for two academic historians. Besides that, though, no real complaints about this work.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Civil War Reader on October 21, 2009
Format: Paperback
God and General Longstreet is a study of the Lost Cause mentality, its
origins, its icons and how religion was central to many aspects of the Lost
Cause Movement. The book's primary theme is really a fairly good explanation
of how Robert E. Lee was deified and cast as the "principle standard bearer"
of the Confederacy. Also how he was made out to be the perfect Christian
warrior to fit the mythology. The book's title is somewhat misleading
though. A 150 page book, there are a scant 10 pages that mentions
Longstreet. These 10 pages do basically explain how some in the South
created lies about Longstreet's war record, and why they hated him for
becoming a Republican, but this section is not at all in proportion to the
rest of the book enough that warrants his name in the title of the book. It
is not an in-depth explanation of the casting of how and where Longstreet
was spun into the Lost Cause legends.

One of the most interesting sections is about R. E. Lee's own writings about
his feelings as a career soldier before the Civil War. The author's bring up
his ironically unsure self-image as a career soldier to contrast what
the Lost Cause movement made him out to be. This work points out that during his US Army career, Lee felt it would destine him to a restless life separated from his roots. Lee described Army life as an existence that "debars all hope of domestic enjoyment," and he viewed family separation as "a just punishment for my sins." The books better sections bring out some fascinating and little known research on Lee.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Want to discover more products? Check out this page to see more: civil war history