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God the Invisible King Paperback – April 6, 2010


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About the Author

British author HERBERT GEORGE WELLS (1866-1946) is best known for his groundbreaking science fiction novels The Time Machine (1895), The Invisible Man (1897), and The War of the Worlds (1898). --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 194 pages
  • Publisher: BiblioLife (April 6, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 114029668X
  • ISBN-13: 978-1140296683
  • Product Dimensions: 9.7 x 0.4 x 7.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12.6 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (13 customer reviews)

Customer Reviews

3.5 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

33 of 35 people found the following review helpful By Sergei Nilus on December 31, 2000
Format: Library Binding
Wells evaluated the philosophical systems and traced their confusion back to lack of agreed definitions of words - in his book The First and Last Things. The sequel being a similar analysis of religions, was titled God The Invisible King.
Here Wells defines his position as a strong believer in one God and proceeds to evaluate the dogmas of the Christian Churches. He describes the notion of Trinity as an Alexandrian contamination three centuries after Jesus from the Nile, declared into creed in council of Nicea, and made fundament of all Churches of Christianity since then. Well calls the bluff of mysteries of the Triune or trinity, attributing an anti-religion motive to the institution that has been instilling this dogma into children. He describes his own childhood experience and how he was driven away from the Creater by the dogma.
It should be read together with Thomas Paine for a complete perspective of scriptures, institutions and effects on which the religion in the West is based.
It is a pity that the other two boks of Wells which make a series with this one are not included among books offered here. I thought they were missing even among books out of print. These are, as said above, First and Last Things and The Open Conspiracy.
Wells is going to make a spectacular come back in one of these days, to take most established institutions by surprize, as very graphically and prophetically described in When the Sleeper Awakes! Also an immortal book.
Have fun.
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11 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Aaron Wooldridge on February 6, 2011
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I REALLY REALLY wanted to like this book. Throughout the entire first half I was planning to give it 4 stars because it greatly inspired me. In the second half Wells' weak arguments dropped it to 3 stars. By the end the book was such a confusing mess that I dropped it to 2 stars. Finally I bumped it up to 3 again just because it is a good historical resource into Wells' thinking. Honestly I say it's 2 1/2, but I'm having a really hard time giving an H.G. Wells book fewer than 3 stars.

Everybody knows that H.G. Wells was an atheist. At least that is a common conception, but in this book Wells' vehemently denies it and spends the entire book laying out his form of neo-theism. I was confused by this and did a little online research. According to the H.G. Wells Society of America, Wells was an atheist but went through a religious phase due to the emotional trama of World War I. Supposedly he rejected those religious ideas later in life; I will have to read my copy of Wells' "Experiment in Autobiography" to get a better understanding of his religious views. In any event, "God the Invisible King" was written in that religious phase contemporary to the First World War.

The purpose of this book is to lay out H.G. Wells' religous beliefs and those of "modern religion". He explicity claims on the first page that he is not a Christian. Although to us it seems like he is trying to promote a new future movement, to Wells himself this modern religion was already happening in his day and was the direction that religion would continue to go. (He might have been right except that the reactionary fundamentalist Christian movement changed modern religion into something quite different.) First Wells lays out the difference between the Creator God and the Christ God.
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12 of 14 people found the following review helpful By Felicity Barrington on February 6, 2010
Format: Paperback
This is an excellent book. H.G. Wells was a deeply spiritual man just not in any traditional sense. His views on religion are very unique and intriguing. I would have thought him to be an atheist, but obviously he was not. His comments on the subject bring that to light, and interestingly he dubs atheism as a religion.
He calls the Council of Nicaea the most disastrous of all religious gatherings and expresses a lot of disagreement with current Christian dogma, particularly the cruel and arrogant portions of it. I definitely agree with him on that.

I think Christians' insistence that their way is the only right one and you will be tortured in hell forever if you don't agree cannot possibly be true and is inconsistent with the actions of a loving god. Wells also talks about the popular belief that people are born into sin along with a lot of other spiritual topics, on which he has many interesting points to make.

What I liked the most about this book was Wells belief that organized religion is unnecessary to spiritual growth and, in fact, harmful. I strongly agree with him on that. I was also very interested to read his thoughts on this subject. This is the only book like this that he has ever written, and his beliefs surprised me.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Israel Drazin VINE VOICE on February 4, 2011
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
The January 24, 2011 issue of The New Yorker had a cartoon that expressed the feelings of most people. One character said to another: "I'm in the market for an easier religion." Readers of H. G. Wells' God the Invisible King (1866-1946, written in 1917), which is not a novel, but expresses his views of God and religion, may think that he reflects this attitude. Actually the reverse is true. He writes that people must learn to act, not passively wait for divine aid. Some readers may disagree with his views, but they should find them thought-provoking.

Wells states that he is not a Christian and his ideas are not Christian. He says that he believes in a "personal and intimate God." He rejects the widely held dogmas, especially the "disastrous" idea of a trinity. There is "no revelation, no authoritative teaching, no mystery." Ideas such as a virgin birth and resurrection and sin are untrue. These dogmas prevent people from thinking about the truth, make them passive, and discourage them from living a proper fulfilling life.

The word "God," he writes, could mean God as nature or God as helper. The first, he says, is the God of Spinoza and the second the God of the human heart. Wells believes that if a person accepts the first understanding there is no problem, but he prefers the second. When people petition God for help, the same God that helps everyone, no matter what the person's religion. God is not a being attached to a particular religion. All people are, metaphorically speaking, God's children. God is not found in a building, but in the heart.

Wells defines God as "boundless love," a "friend," "courage," and "salvation from the purposelessness of life." God "works in men and through men." He does not intervene in this world to help people.
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