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God Is Not Great: How Religion Poisons Everything Paperback – April 6, 2009


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Read the first chapter of Christopher Hitchens's God Is Not Great [PDF].

Product Details

  • Paperback: 336 pages
  • Publisher: Twelve (April 6, 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0446697966
  • ISBN-13: 978-0446697965
  • Product Dimensions: 7.7 x 5.1 x 1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 11.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1,566 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,002 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Hitchens, one of our great political pugilists, delivers the best of the recent rash of atheist manifestos. The same contrarian spirit that makes him delightful reading as a political commentator, even (or especially) when he's completely wrong, makes him an entertaining huckster prosecutor once he has God placed in the dock. And can he turn a phrase!: "monotheistic religion is a plagiarism of a plagiarism of a hearsay of a hearsay, of an illusion of an illusion, extending all the way back to a fabrication of a few nonevents." Hitchens's one-liners bear the marks of considerable sparring practice with believers. Yet few believers will recognize themselves as Hitchens associates all of them for all time with the worst of history's theocratic and inquisitional moments. All the same, this is salutary reading as a means of culling believers' weaker arguments: that faith offers comfort (false comfort is none at all), or has provided a historical hedge against fascism (it mostly hasn't), or that "Eastern" religions are better (nope). The book's real strength is Hitchens's on-the-ground glimpses of religion's worst face in various war zones and isolated despotic regimes. But its weakness is its almost fanatical insistence that religion poisons "everything," which tips over into barely disguised misanthropy. (May 30)
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Booklist

*Starred Review* God is getting bad press lately. Sam Harris' The End of Faith(2005) and Richard Dawkins' The God Delusion (2006) have questioned the existence of any spiritual being and met with enormous success. Now, noted, often acerbic journalist Hitchens enters the fray. As his subtitle indicates, his premise is simple. Not only does religion poison everything, which he argues by explaining several ways in which religion is immoral, but the world would be better off without religion. Replace religious faith with inquiry, open-mindedness, and the pursuit of ideas, he exhorts. Closely reading major religious texts, Hitchens points to numerous examples of atrocities and mayhem in them. Religious faith, he asserts, is both result and cause of dangerous sexual repression. What's more, it is grounded in nothing more than wish fulfillment. Hence, he believes that religion is man-made, and an ethical life can be lived without its stamp of approval. With such chapter titles as "Religion Kills" and "Is Religion Child Abuse?" Hitchens intends to provoke, but he is not mean-spirited and humorless. Indeed, he is effortlessly witty and entertaining as well as utterly rational. Believers will be disturbed and may even charge him with blasphemy (he questions not only the virgin birth but the very existence of Jesus), and he may not change many minds, but he offers the open-minded plenty to think about. June Sawyers
Copyright © American Library Association. All rights reserved --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

More About the Author

Christopher Hitchens (1949-2011) was the author of Letters to a Young Contrarian, and the bestseller No One Left to Lie To: The Values of the Worst Family. A regular contributor to Vanity Fair, The Atlantic Monthly and Slate, Hitchens also wrote for The Weekly Standard, The National Review, and The Independent, and appeared on The Daily Show, Charlie Rose, The Chris Matthew's Show, Real Time with Bill Maher, and C-Span's Washington Journal. He was named one of the world's "Top 100 Public Intellectuals" by Foreign Policy and Britain's Prospect.

Customer Reviews

Nephi's father in the Book of Mormon is Lehi, not Lephi.
Christopher Johnson
The late and great Christopher Hitchens makes the brilliant, concise, and simply rational case as to why "god is NOT Great", how religion poisons everything!
Sassan31
If you have any doubts about religion and faith, reading this book will make you an atheist.
Troels Danielsen

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

2,804 of 3,001 people found the following review helpful By Scott Bresinger on May 14, 2007
Format: Hardcover
After looking through some of the other customer reviews found here, I was dismayed by the amount of "blog-style" entries: that is, people who may have only glanced at the title or saw Hitchens promoting the book on CNN or YouTube and decided to just speak up, either in support or condemnation. However, if you're curious about the book and just want to know what to expect, may I humbly offer some actual information?

Hitchens, a contributing editor to Vanity Fair, author of books too numerous to mention and contributor to smaller magazines such as Free Inquiry, adds to the recent renaissance of pro-atheist books with his own provocatively-titled contribution. Whereas Sam Harris (The End of Faith: Religion, Terror, and the Future of Reason) sees dire warnings and Richard Dawkins (The God Delusion offers a defense of science, Hitchens uses his long experience in journalism to illustrate the madness that results when faith is unchallenged by reason. Dawkins has been criticized for adopting a harsh tone (an assessment I disagree with), but Hitchens is the one who really pours on the anger and witty derision.
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675 of 739 people found the following review helpful By Kashyap Deorah on August 5, 2007
Format: Hardcover
My favorite part of the book is the last third. By that time Hitchens has made his arguments about how Religion Poisons Everything and is now rebutting the best intellectual arguments against his thesis. What would become of human decency, morality and ethics without religion? How do you address the inherent human need to believe in something and take comfort in a higher power? What are the god-less alternatives and aren't those institutions as bad or worse? Doesn't religion provide stability to society by pacifying individuals in times of darkness and uncertainty? It is hard to sum things up and provide sound bytes about something as complex as religion, but my take-away from this book is that any religion (by design) has the ingredients of becoming totalitarian, when successful; and totalitarianism of any kind leads to ultimate power corruption.

Hitchens makes his arguments and rebuts the best counter-arguments with passion and panache. If you are amongst the majority of people in the world - believers - his irreverent sense of humor may lead you to immediately brush him off as a partisan hack; while the unbelievers will get a kick out of each of the thousands of punchlines that Hitchens artfully mumbles. However, if you belong to the third category - an intellectual who chooses to look beyond a bi-polar view of the world when it comes to religion - I would urge patience with Hitchens' indulgence as a genius linguist (when you have it, it is hard not to flaunt it!) and you will find this book extremely rewarding and will not go un-satiated. If you are seriously debating the merits and demerits of religion as an institution in the society we live in, you have glanced at the perfect place, no matter what your affiliations.
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81 of 87 people found the following review helpful By Anoname on August 14, 2007
Format: Hardcover
When I came to read the reviews (out of curiosity) on Amazon, I first went on to read the one-star reviews. I was amused that many have clearly not read the book, but felt that their defense and protection of the faith was necessary. Many voice their maliciously gleeful prophecies of Hitchens ending up in hell alternating with those who in their gracious piety wish him "saved" from this otherwise inevitable fate. Others go into long nervously complex and defensive discourses to draw "aha! now I can rest easy" conclusions as to why Hitchens was all wrong about their specific brand of faith. A stark parallel to how religious texts are designed to make things convoluted and abstruse with riddles within riddles and side-winds for every long-wind with the end result to successfully befuddle and consequently beguile the masses.

I do not see this book as a detailed thesis and nor did I expect Hitchens (nor do I think this is possible) to be an expert on each tedious detail relating to every religion. I find this quite irrelevent to the intent of the discourse in the book. Further, I do not see this as some juvenile battle between the virtues of all believers versus all non-believers. I must add that one big difference between how religion (as opposed to a lack thereof) manages to impact the lives of all is it's need and very mission to impose, interfere, and establish.

I see this as a book as something that improves our perspective and understanding of an age-old subject that has a huge bearing on all our lives. It makes us observe and be mindful of our primitive brains, impulses, and tendencies. It forces us to sit back and think of the absurdity in so many of the decisions and interactions we take for granted all around us.
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