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God and Man at Georgetown Prep: How I Became a Catholic Despite 20 Years of Catholic Schooling Paperback – July 1, 2005


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 192 pages
  • Publisher: The Crossroad Publishing Company (July 1, 2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 082452313X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0824523138
  • Product Dimensions: 6.2 x 0.5 x 8.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 5.6 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (11 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,908,539 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

58 of 65 people found the following review helpful By Frank T. Pimentel on July 1, 2005
Format: Paperback
Anyone who sets to stepping into William F. Buckley, Jr.'s giant shoes by borrowing the title "God and Man at . . ." undertakes quite a task. I am happy to report, though, that Judge pulls it off pretty well.
Short disclaimer--I was a classmate of his at Georgetown Prep. Having said that, I was not a part of the group of friends he writes about. It is fair to say that I knew more of "Mr. Judge" during our school years than I actually knew him. Suffice it to say that he is obviously now a much different person than he was 22 years ago.
The fact that I wasn't part of his "group" serves as a jumping-off point. While he doesn't mention this in the book, Georgetown Prep is part boarding school, and about 20% of the students (at least that was the number back then) board, and I was one of them. So what he observed between 8 and 5, I lived 24 hours a day. As he writes, there was really something of a dichotomy among the Jesuits--largely based on their age.
For example, my Spanish teacher was of the old-school, WWII generation, and he tolerated no nonsense. He was, unsurprisingly, also a splendid teacher, and when I told him that I was applying for a ROTC scholarship, he cheered me on. Contrast that with "Father Macabee," about whom Judge writes. "Macabee" was no more than 10 years older than we were (and truth be told, he was still a Jesuit scholastic, i.e. not yet ordained), and he was horrified when I told him about my ROTC plans. Of course, as Judge reports, "Macabee" left the Jesuits soon thereafter.
Unfortunately, not all of the "Macabees" have left.
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15 of 17 people found the following review helpful By Cookbook Gal VINE VOICE on February 28, 2006
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Many of the author's experiences mirrored my own. If you are well-versed in Catholicism, the extensive quotes from it's great writers may irritate you. For me, they were like water in the desert. Like Judge, I have only recently become aware of the richness of the writing of Catholics throughout the ages. His book served as a valuable resource to other authors who do not spend all their time bashing Catholicism, but actually examine its doctrine within a greater spiritual context. In other words, it is a relief to find authors who examine the spiritual rationale for church doctrines, instead of advocating a change to universal truths simply because they are incovenient to modern life.
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33 of 42 people found the following review helpful By Neal J. Conway on June 17, 2005
Format: Paperback
Like the author of this book, I also went Georgetown Prep and Catholic University. Religious education at GP was not very memorable--which could also be said of every other Catholic school--and religious education at CU could be downright heretical.

However there was at GP, one teacher who bucked the trend and still dealt in the old Catholic wisdom. He was Fr. John Nicola who had been the consultant to the movie, "The Exorcist." In the late `70s/early `80s, Fr. Nicola taught Thomistic Philosophy and an analysis of the Ten Commandments. I'm surprised Fr. Nicola was not included as a trend-bucking teacher among the pseudonymous faculty in this book as the author should certainly have been aware of him.

Otherwise, for those who haven't yet realized there's a revolution going on, this book an OK introduction to contemporary Catholic issues, even if it is a gush of names, titles, biographies and extensive quotes from other works (about 40% of the text). If you have ready other book, article, web site about what went wrong in the Church during the misinterpretation of Vatican II, you will find nothing new here.
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24 of 33 people found the following review helpful By Brooke A. Beyer Jr. on July 8, 2005
Format: Paperback
Judge takes dead aim at a vaunted institution and squarely connects. His criticism of the curriculum is valid and the delightful adventures he speaks of have more than a ring of truth--since I too experienced both as a classmate of Judge's. Georgetown Prep would be wise to heed the author's advice and do the right thing: hire Mark Judge as a religion teacher.
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20 of 28 people found the following review helpful By Clark on January 14, 2006
Format: Paperback
This is a remarkable book from a very courageous fellow. As the other reviews show, the book manages to show a lot about what changes happened in the Catholic church and educational systems, especially throughout the 60s and 70s. But the book does more than this. It actually gives insight into how these separate paths (orthodox, "progressive," and so on) existed side by side. Even though the author was kind of railing against liberals, you can see that he actually tried to get inside their head and understand them for what they were trying to accomplish. I don't mean the book is soft (it's a little over the top), but it's not just Ann Coulter screaming at people. It's really a good look at shifting cultures. I recommend it highly.
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5 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Peter P. Fuchs on May 5, 2011
Format: Paperback
I am not a big fan of Catholic schools, having spent too many years in them, especially as a young kid. But precisely because I spent a lot of time in them, I know that the contention of this book that the environment amounted to a sort of functional atheism is just false. History always has contradictions, and we should not white-wash them. But we surely should not not engage in the inverse either, just to make cheap points. As to Georgetown itself I think his Buckley-esque animadversions about the place are just fluff, and miss the whole point. Georgetown should be congratulated for their more open stance towards many things, not blamed. I am thankful for their more tolerant view of gay issues, and for the presence of Joseph Palacios, who is working for Marriage Equality. Also, in the past, before returning to working again in research and scholarship, I made my living for many years as a practitioner of the Rolfing Technique, a type of physical therapy for chronic pain. And one of my most pleasant clients was John DeGioia, who is now president of Georgetown. I was happy I was able to resolve the vertebral fixation that caused his pain. But I was also very happy that this very well-placed guy was very accepting of me as a gay man. That says a lot about Georgetown, in a good way!
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