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24 of 27 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Best Book in 20th Century!
Dr. Henry is "the founder and father and the primary architect" of Evangelicalism in 20th century, and the today's leading think tank among the 20th century intellectuals and scholarship since 1940's. No doubt, He is the living landmark of 20th century. This volume is his masterpiece and his life-time monument. And I dare to say the landmark of the 20th...
Published on May 10, 2000 by Richard K. Min

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8 of 68 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Greater than Tillich, greater than Barth, greater than...
The greatest book in the century? My, Steinbeck, Ginsberg, and Faulkner might have to move over! This is the best example of fundamentalist scholasticism there is, straining at a gnat and swallowing a camel. If your Christinity comes to you as a mathematical equation (i.e. if you are interested in proving what you believe, sadly), you'll love Henry's book. But don't...
Published on May 13, 2000


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24 of 27 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Best Book in 20th Century!, May 10, 2000
By 
Richard K. Min (Dallas, Texas, USA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: God, Revelation and Authority (6 Volume Set) (Paperback)
Dr. Henry is "the founder and father and the primary architect" of Evangelicalism in 20th century, and the today's leading think tank among the 20th century intellectuals and scholarship since 1940's. No doubt, He is the living landmark of 20th century. This volume is his masterpiece and his life-time monument. And I dare to say the landmark of the 20th century in Christian philosophy and theory. The volume 1 brings the best academic and philosophical survey and discussion that 20th century could offer. If one can read through carefully, he/she will (1) survey the contemporary philosophy and theology with "the" master, and (2) be able to critique all in the first class scholarship and in "the" Evangelical perspective. I guarantee that this volume enables its faithful reader to be the world-class critical thinker in Christianity. If you want to challenge the top of "the" mountain of today's intellectual and leading scholarship in Christian Philosophy and Worldview, I recommend first of all without any hesitation, this volume! (He is a humble and godly man, and my dear teacher with Father's heart equipped with Grace and Truth of God. He lectured this volume to our class years ago and I was blessed enough to take a few courses from this world-class master).
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16 of 17 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars How Firm a Foundation!, November 22, 2005
This review is from: God, Revelation and Authority (6 Volume Set) (Paperback)
Henry, Carl F. H. God, Revelation, and Authority. 6 Volumes.
Seeing the incomplete rubble of humanism and a shattered epistemological foundation, Henry attempts to provide a consistently Christian perspective to God, authority, reason, the limits and benefits of systematic theology, etc. Henry argues in the opening books that we are facing the rise of a new Dark Ages. Humanism cannot maintain a long-term vision for civilization, but neither can the modern church, given their inane infatuation with the world and their faulty epistemology (assuming that the church shares a Foundationalistic or Postmodern epistemology). Therefore, the Church must reorient herself around vigorous thinking and a firm commitment to Scripture.

*Focus*
Henry's main sparring partner is Karl Barth. Barth was arguable the most influential voice of the 20th century (if not always the best voice). Therefore, when Barth speaks people listen. Henry listened and responded with 6 volumes. This is where reading Henry gets difficult. Many readers will hear Al Mohler or David Wells (rightly) praise Henry as a clear theological voice in this century. That is true, but one must also know the context in which Henry wrote, otherwise nothing is clear.

Another difficulty in reading Henry is the deep, philosophical well from which he draws. I began Henry with *no* philosophical background whatsoever. I was lost on many of his discussions. Without a basic philosophical framework in mind, I thought Henry was skipping from topic to topic. So, before beginning Henry I would recommend a basic philosophical overview (Colin Brown or Richard Tarnas). While slow going at first, it will pay dividends later.

Also, it wouldn't hurt to know what Barth is saying either. I do not share Barth's worldview. I think it is dangerous and a wolf in sheep's clothing. That being said, Barth appears in almost every chapter. Begin with a small Barthian book (*Humanity of God*, perhaps).

While I can't give a full overview of what Henry said, here are some questions/issues he wrestles with:
*Is human language adequate/sufficient to deal with religious phenomena? Henry takes the affirmative and deals with Langdon Gilkey.
*Can man actually do a systematic theology? If so, what constitutes biblical categories?
*How does God reveal himself to man? When God reveals himself to man, he uses propositions that have corresponding truth-value.
*Is natural theology adequate, or even viable? No. While I agree with Henry's conclusions, I think Greg Bahnsen via Van Til does a better job here. Interestingly enough, and Henry didn't develop this point: deny natural theology and natural law goes out the window. If natural law is not an option, then what is? Think Greg Bahnsen.
*On the practical level, how are evangelicals to do theology and face the crisis of the future? Evangelicalism lacks the intellectual nerve to write a modern day *City of God.* In other words, the Secular West is falling at an alarming rate (as was Rome) and we need, but lack, an Augustine to answer the crisis. (I will address this in my conclusion.)

Now, as to the reviwer who said that Henry ended up arguing for a god as abstract as Aristotle's, I have only to say that he/she did not read Henry. Henry spends 30 pages arguing specifically against such a deity. Oh well, wisdom is justified by her children.

Henry's Method for Theology is as following:

Divine revelation is the source of all truth, the truth of Christianity included; reason is the instrument for recognizing it; Scripture is its verifying principle; logical consistency of a negative test for truth and coherence a subordinate test. The task of Christian theology is to exhibit the content of biblical revelation as an orderly whole."
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars One Of A Kind, September 26, 2007
This review is from: God, Revelation and Authority (6 Volume Set) (Paperback)
Carl Henry had an illustrious career, which influenced most theological seminaries and bible colleges, some even unbeknown to today's generation. In a time of opposing views from differing higher-criticism schools (Bultmann, Barth etc.) his was the lone evangelical voice calling to remain true to the revealed and propositional Word of truth.

'Christianity depicts itself - essentially theological though it be - not as a supremely constructed metaphysical theory, but as a revelation, differing in kind from secular philosophies grounded in rational reflection. Its basic premise is that the living God should be allowed to speak for Himself and to define the abiding role of reason and the meaning of revelation.' p 95

His work is majestic. His grasp is overarching, always worldview-ish, always generational, always God-centered. The 6 Volumes display the journalistic powers he had, and the power to reason and debate. He was the founder of Christianity Today and served as its Editor in Charge for many decades. He passed away recently, but his influence in especially Christian institutions and seminaries will long outlive those of Bultmann and Barth.

The following quotations are from one chapter alone, 'Secular Man and Ultimate Concerns', Book 1:

'The ecumenical movement with its focus on 'what the Spirit is saying to the churches' rather than on what the inspired Scripture ongoingly says, has meanwhile been more open to an emphasis on charismatic renewal than on a recovery of the Reformation.' 1:131

'The universal disclosure of God penetrates deeply into all man's confidences and doubts. Evidence of God's reality and power and truth and goodness is ongoingly refracted into the course of man's daily life.' p 151

'Divine being and divine providence are denied.' p 138

'Man's sense of personal worth and peculiar destiny derives from remnants of the created Imago Dei in man, and beyond that from the ongoing universal revelation of the Creator.' p 145

'If man made for God, will not live by the truth of God, he will nevertheless venture on his own to invest his life with sense and security by serving false gods.' p 150

'An obituary for God is assuredly always premature.' ibid
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars THE THEOLOGICAL SUMMATION OF A PREEMINENT MODERN EVANGELICAL, January 26, 2010
This review is from: God, Revelation and Authority (6 Volume Set) (Paperback)
Carl F. Henry (1913-2003) was the founding Editor of Christianity Today, and one of the foremost evangelical scholars of the 20th century. In these six volumes (originally released in three sets of two volumes, in 1976, 1979, and 1983), he summarizes a lifetime of research.

In his 1999 "Series Preface," Henry states, "The six volumes ... represent my effort to challenge the course of modern theology..... 'God, Revelation, and Authority' is a challenge to the fluctuating theological outlook of a century that lacked religious compass bearings.... I aimed to exhibit the logical power of truth and the permanent relevance of the scriptural alternative."

The first four volumes are subtitled, "God Who Speaks and Shows." Volume I, "Preliminary Considerations," argues that "the debate in theology today ... is being waged most fiercely over the significance of the competing cultural frameworks and interpretations of human meaning and worth," and asserts that "Christianity professes to supply the enduring conceptuality that alone makes possible an ongoing unity of theology, philosophy, history, and science."

The next three volumes contain Henry's "Fifteen Theses" (which are briefly summarized in ten pages in the Preface to Volume II), such as, "Revelation is ... God's free communication by which he alone turns his personal privacy into a deliberate disclosure of his reality" (#1), "God's revelation is rational communication conveyed in intelligible ideas and meaningful words" (#10), and "The church approximates the kingdom of God in miniature" (#14). The scope expands significantly in volumes III and IV (Vol. II was 334 pages, while III and IV are 487 and 614 pages, respectively).

The last two volumes are subtitled, "God Who Stands and Stays," in which Henry argues, "that divine revelation is rationally given and is to be rationally understood, is a basic presupposition of biblical theology," and "The biblical presuppositions concerning God remain the most significant guideposts for human affairs and for the planet that provides man's temporary dwelling place."

Though fairly comprehensive, GR&A is no "Systematic Theology," summarizing all of Christian doctrine. And Henry is sometimes too prolix in terms of his summaries and commentaries on other theologians (James Barr, author of books such as Fundamentalism in particular seems to receive far too much attention), and somewhat skimpy on Henry's own views. Nevertheless, this series is an indispensable addition to any serious theological library.
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18 of 25 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A 1st rate education/challenge for those not narrow-minded, September 2, 2000
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This review is from: God, Revelation and Authority (6 Volume Set) (Paperback)
I've not had as much opportunity to pore through Dr. Henry's masterful work as I've wished to have. This is a truly scholarly work, not for the shallow of mind, but for the thoughtful reader. It will certainly be found far more worth pondering than either the touchy-feely or pontificating idolized by the destructive reviewers whose only real basis for objection is that "His postions are lucid, logical, and precise."! Oh my! God forbid that positions should be lucid, logical or even make sense, something mindlessly equated with "Aristotelian lenses" (meaning: it doesn't agree with me), as they are predictably blind to their own. His refusal to come down to such a tower of ignorant babble understandably condemns him from the start, but for those few heroic today who still will pursue truth instead of the mindless fantasies of modernism and post-modernism, or even admit there's any to pursue, unlike today's minions too self-centered, narrow-minded & bigoted (intellectually or otherwise), ignorant and lazy to do so, will find a real treasure trove here, pearls unrecognizable to swine (Matt. 7:6), but oh so wonderful to the diligent, noble Berean who dilligently searches to see if these things are so (Acts 17:11).
For a good post-mortem on modern theology, including the "Death of God" "theothanatologists", see John Warwick Montgomery's Suicide of Christian Theology, though any of his works are worthwhile, including his "In Defense of Martin Luther" dealing with those who love to twist and pervert Luther to serve their own ways and ends as badly as they do Scripture.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Indispensable insightful yet unbalanced trinitarian, September 26, 2012
This review is from: God, Revelation and Authority (6 Volume Set) (Paperback)
"Evangelical theology is heretical if it is only creative and unworthy if it is only repetitious" said Carl F. H. Henry (9). Henry attempted to answer what kind of future modern theology held. In the mid-1970s, he envisaged a theology of "no God," a study of the "Lord of the past," "the dead Savior," and an "irrelevant logos." After forty years his predictions became reality attesting that God was considered a "non sensory reality" (1:23); however, it was not God, but man who was suffocated to death in lack of truth and meaning (1:29). From this profane vacuum, Henry elicited a poignant admonition sui generis in order to revive the "God who speaks and shows"; he propounded the fifteen theses that affirmed supremacy of divine revelation against the unwieldy controversy over the reality and nature of such divine disclosure (2:7-16; vols. 1-3).

Nevertheless, Henry recognized that his environment, i.e. the vacillating status quo of science, mass media, universalism, liberalism, fundamentalism, nihilism, pragmatism, different religions, new religions, and even diverse yet anti-Christian cultures from every side circumvented and precluded his attempt to revive a "true and meaningful" theology based on the authority of Scripture. Counteractively, Henry proffered his prolegomena, i.e. vol. 1, which preceded the discussion of the fifteen theses.

First, Henry seemed to point at modern philosophers: From Kant and Descartes to Hegel and Schleiermacher: philosophers effected detrimental consequences for modern theology whether intended or not (1:36ff). Second, theologians like Barth, Bultmann, and Schleiermacher, according to Henry, dismantled the whole foundation of Christian belief system when they diminished the sufficiency of God's revelation in Scripture and enfeebled the authority of Scripture: whatever their own purposes were they obfuscated the meaning of Scripture, turning it into mere myth and experiential resource (1:44ff). Interestingly Henry then moved into a discussion on epistemology. In a move that he only justified later when he drew his theses on the propositional truth of Scripture (cf. vol. 2). Again this is remarkable that Henry actually foresaw this demise of true theology in 1976 (In fact, his prophetic envisions preceded this in 1947 with the publication of The Uneasy Conscience of Modern Fundamentalism). As Winston Churchill's own countrymen forsook his warnings against the rising Nazi regime (cf. Churchill, Memoire, 149), many of his contemporaries neglected his warnings, which only a decade later provoked him to write Twilight of A Great Civilization, which affirmed that his words had been fearfully relevant.

The intricacies of modern theological methods demanded, as Henry realized, new theological theses rather than amendment of such schizophrenic theologies, which only left Henry unworthy resources unable to build up true theology. Thus, Henry's progressive argument successfully illustrated a tactical and teleological supremacy of his theology; he elevated reason through revisiting Augustine and Aquinas, and provided a strong "philosophical rationalism" (90) on the basis of the "Christian revelation" (93), which let the living God alone "speak for himself" (95). With biblical conscience and theological conviction, Henry captures what he believed to be God's message in his revelation (cf. the fifteen theses). Whether his philosophical theology is the best cure for modern theology is yet to be tested, and Henry's heavy dependence on Gordon Clark's assertion on the propositional truth of Scripture seems vacillating, but his methodological arguments against modern theological methods are efficacious.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Books still a Amazon sweet spot!, February 10, 2014
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: God, Revelation and Authority (6 Volume Set) (Paperback)
Searched for it up here in Canada to no avail but found what I wanted on Amazon.com for much much less - - - came well packed, appreciate it! THX! - Buzz
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9 of 14 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars renews my faith in wise old men, November 27, 1999
This review is from: God, Revelation and Authority (6 Volume Set) (Paperback)
his volumes may be lengthy, but they are well worth the read. he provides a penetrating account of God and others often mistaken views of him. his theology is evangelical and presuppositionalist and well articulated.
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7 of 22 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars That Last Guy is Sneaky, September 8, 2001
By A Customer
This review is from: God, Revelation and Authority (6 Volume Set) (Paperback)
This is not "A" book. This is a collection of Henry's writtings from over his whole life. It is organized into 5 separate softback books. Don't pay attention to that last guy. He hasn't even seen these books.
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8 of 68 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Greater than Tillich, greater than Barth, greater than..., May 13, 2000
By A Customer
This review is from: God, Revelation and Authority (6 Volume Set) (Paperback)
The greatest book in the century? My, Steinbeck, Ginsberg, and Faulkner might have to move over! This is the best example of fundamentalist scholasticism there is, straining at a gnat and swallowing a camel. If your Christinity comes to you as a mathematical equation (i.e. if you are interested in proving what you believe, sadly), you'll love Henry's book. But don't let the dust of dead orthodoxy choke you.
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God, Revelation and Authority (6 Volume Set)
God, Revelation and Authority (6 Volume Set) by Carl F. H. Henry (Paperback - January 25, 1999)
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