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God for Us: The Trinity and Christian Life Paperback – June 11, 1993


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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

A brilliant theologian revitalizes theology and Christian life by recovering the early Christian roots of God as Trinity. She shows how understanding God as a community of persons is vital to the living of Christian faith.

About the Author

Catherine Mowry LaCugna is professor of theology at the University of Notre Dame and is the author of God for Us: The Trinity and Christian Life.
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 448 pages
  • Publisher: HarperSanFrancisco; Reprint edition (June 11, 1993)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0060649135
  • ISBN-13: 978-0060649135
  • Product Dimensions: 6.1 x 1 x 9.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (15 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #226,424 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

49 of 52 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on November 25, 1999
Format: Paperback
This book is quite challenging, intellectually, but worth the effort. Be aware of her bias: her position is that the devlopment of Trinitarian theology lost its way after the 4th century Cappadocians! As a result, she asserts, the doctrine lost its relevance. It has become only a source for academic speculation, detached from "real life." LaCugna wants to "rescue" the Trinity from that irrelevance. In the book, she effectively reformulates the doctrine as a source of theological nourishment for the church today. The doctrine only has value, according to LaCugna, if it describes our experience of how God comes to us, offering salvation. In that context, LaCugna does an excellent job of summarizing the historical background to the doctrine of the Trinity, and of connecting the doctrine to the Christian life.
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43 of 50 people found the following review helpful By Zossima on August 5, 2000
Format: Paperback
The Trinity is one of the most challenging and most neglected doctrines in the Church. Lacugna makes learning about the doctrine A VERY REWARDING EXPERIENCE.
She summarizes the development of the doctrine from the first century to today. Her intent, however, is to argue that the doctrine of the Trinity is not an explanation of a God who is somewhere "out there" in eternity, but rather an explanation of the community of a God who is present and inviting us into community. She supports her position well, drawing from the ancients and contemporary Orthodox and Catholic theologians.
The subject matter of the book is very challenging. It will take most people awhile to get through the material. But each page is a pearl and the reward for reading it is great.
I encourage anybody with an interest in the doctrine of the Trinity to prioritize reading this book.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Jacob on February 3, 2014
Format: Paperback
Argues that developing theological reflection slowly separated economy from theology, which made the Trinity appear more and more irrelevant. I am not sure about her thesis in the specifics, but I think she is on to something: positing an ontological God apart from God’s decision to redeem the world in Christ does create a metaphysical gap in God. Like others before her, she seeks to correlate the pattern of God’s salvation in history with the being of God (Lacugna 4).

Introduction and Chapter 1

Contrary to what might appear, she is not arguing a “fall” in the early church from Nicene onwards. Rather, the early church necessarily (and rightly) used the philosophical and theological categories available to confront heresies. The downside is that these categories made correct speech about God increasingly difficult.

Lacunga correctly downplays the so-called differences between East and West on the Trinity. That there are differences is evident, but neither side has the clear advantage. Both ended up separating the being of God from his Acts in history.

“Economy” is the pattern of God’s saving actions in history. It is “the order that expresses the mystery of God’s eternal being” (25; cf. Ephesians 1:3-14).

Conclusion and Critique

My critique will also include a lot of the later material in her book. While I think her initial thesis is sound (a hard divorce between economy and theology posits an irrelevant Trinity), I think she is rather haphazard in applying it.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Laird Russell Yearwood on October 4, 2010
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Enjoyed rereading this volume very much. I had read it while in seminary and then it was subsequently destroyed when my study at the church was broken into. I have been reading Barth again recently and so wanted have LaCugna's views on the Trinitarian background info Barth used. I'm very glad to have a copy in my library again.
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17 of 25 people found the following review helpful By Lynn Nicholson on February 16, 2000
Format: Paperback
The maze of philosophical thought through which the anti-Nicene Fathers traveled, and through which the leaders of the Church traveled following Nicea and Chalcedon, are very difficult to trace. However, Catherine Lacugna has been of great assistance to me in the effort to understand them.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I don't know why it took me so long to pick up this book, published more than two decades ago, but it has proven to be revelatory. Catherine Mowry LaCugna provides us with a thoughtful and provocative exposition of the Trinitarian faith, showing that the immanent Trinity (God in God's self) cannot be known except through God's economy of salvation. She demonstrates with great coherence that we know God's being (ousia) in God's persons as Father, Son, Holy Spirit. Because we know God in terms of persons, who are in relationship, our faith should be relational -- and egalitarian.

This provides historical and theological accounting, but ends with an important chapter on living in the Trinity, for we know God as Trinity in God's work of salvation in Christ through the Holy Spirit.

Take and read!
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By claire on April 27, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
A very comprehensive study of God and how Mankind has perceived God for a long long time. It also gives on the
opportunity to dare think of their personal God and how life can be happier with such knowledge that leads to a relationship with God
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